Tips on Observing with Binoculars

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Tips on Observing with Binoculars
Posted by DaveMitsky on Friday, November 05, 2010 2:03 PM

Binocular astronomy is rather easy to carry out and is also a lot of fun.  Binoculars are relatively inexpensive and are eminently portable.  Employing both eyes simultaneously definitely adds to the visual experience.  

Binoculars are ideal for showing the "big picture".  These instruments can readily display objects that are too large to fit into the fields of view of most telescopes.  In addition, binoculars can often be useful in "surveying" the area where an object is located prior to conducting a telescopic star-hop.

A surprising number of celestial objects, including many binary stars, open and globular star clusters, nebulae, and some of the brighter galaxies, can be detected with binoculars.  Scanning through the heart of the Milky Way with a binocular from a dark site is a very memorable experience.

I recommend purchasing a 10x50 (i.e., 10 power and 50mm aperture) binocular for astronomical use.  A 10x50 binocular is usually not overly heavy for most people to hand-hold and provides a 5mm exit pupil that will be appropriate for most observers when age and observing site darkness are taken into account*.  People who must wear eyeglasses while observing may want to look for a binocular with at least 14mm of eye relief.  Browse http://www.skynews.ca/choosing-binoculars-for-stargazing/ and http://binocularsky.com/binoc_basics.php for tips on choosing binoculars:

There's more on binocular performance at http://www.wwnorton.com/college/astronomy/astro21/sandt/powerbinocs.html

A chart showing the effects of magnification and aperture on binocular performance is posted at http://www.wwnorton.com/college/astronomy/astro21/sandt/images/pabin2.gif

A three part evaluation of three different binocular apertures can be found at the following URLs:

http://www.skyandtelescope.com/community/skyblog/home/7151386.html

http://www.skyandtelescope.com/community/skyblog/home/7172141.html

http://www.skyandtelescope.com/community/skyblog/home/7272326.html

In my opinion, the best binocular observing guides available are Touring the Universe through Binoculars by Philip S. Harrington, Binocular Astronomy by Graig Crossen & Wil Tirion, Binocular Highlights: 99 Celestial Sights for Binocular Users by Gary Seronik, and Observing the Night Sky with Binoculars by Stephen O'Meara.

http://www.philharrington.net/sw8.htm

http://www.willbell.com/handbook/HAND2.htm

http://www.shopatsky.com/product/Binocular-Highlights/books

http://www.cambridge.org/us/catalogue/catalogue.asp?isbn=9780521721707 

Phil Harrington discusses various targets monthly in his Cloudy Nights Binocular Universe column at http://cloudynights.com/category.php?category_id=182 and in a quarterly column in Astronomy.  He offers an excellent freeware planetarium program known as TUBA (Touring the Universe through Binoculars Atlas), which also includes information on purchasing binoculars, at http://www.philharrington.net/tuba.htm

A number of articles on observing with binoculars are posted at http://www.skyandtelescope.com/community/skyblog/stargazing/86589452.html

Tips on binocular astronomy are available at the following sites: 

http://binocularsky.com/

http://www.stargazing.net/david/binoculars/ 

http://www.skynews.ca/binoculars-an-essential-tool-for-backyard-astronomers/

http://earthsky.org/astronomy-essentials/top-tips-for-using-ordinary-binoculars-for-stargazing

A video on observing with binoculars is posted at http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=wAnAZz-ZPJ0

This website discusses a number of deep-sky objects that can be seen through binoculars.  http://www.starman.co.uk/book/hba-home.htm is another binocular astronomy site worthy of consulting.  See http://astrogeek.wordpress.com/2007/07/18/binocular-objects/ for a long list of binocular targets; http://www.deepsky.info/other/Binocular%20Targets.PDF is another list.   A few more good objects are mentioned at http://www.backyard-astro.com/deepsky/bino/homeb.html

My monthly lists of binocular deep-sky objects are posted at http://cs.astronomy.com/asycs/forums/t/48393.aspx

A list of binocular objects is included with each monthly Evening Sky Map at
http://skymaps.com/downloads.html

The Astronomical League's Binocular Messier, Deep Sky Binocular, and Southern Sky Binocular lists include many of the best binocular deep-sky objects:

http://www.astroleague.org/al/obsclubs/binomess/binomesb.html

http://www.astroleague.org/al/obsclubs/dsbinoc/dsbnlist.htm

http://www.astroleague.org/al/obsclubs/sskybino/ssbinoc1.html

Sketches of a number of deep-sky objects as seen through binoculars can be found at http://rodelaet.xtreemhost.com/binocular_astronomy.html

Mounting a binocular on a tripod, or better still, a dedicated binocular mount (guider) will improve views markedly.  An informative pdf on binocular mounts is posted at http://www.cloudynights.com/documents/thoughts.pdf

* An excellent explanation of exit pupil can be found at http://www.nikon.com/products/sportoptics/how_to/guide/binoculars/basic/basic_05.htm

Dave Mitsky

Sic itur ad astra!

Chance favors the prepared mind.

A man is a small thing, and the night is very large and full of wonders.

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Posted by DaveMitsky on Tuesday, May 17, 2011 11:26 AM

I had to bump this because sticky posts only last for so long here, despite the useless year-long and forever options.

Dave Mitsky

Sic itur ad astra!

Chance favors the prepared mind.

A man is a small thing, and the night is very large and full of wonders.

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Posted by tower3 on Wednesday, September 14, 2011 2:55 PM

Thanks Dave, These tips are very useful to me. I'm only familiar with a very few targets so getting help with targets that most on the forum consider very elementary is a great help.

EASY DUDE, THERE WILL BE ANOTHER WAVE

From San Diego, Zhumell Z10 (Bubba is for all around observing)Telrad, Vixen VMC110L on a Porta Mount II,  Bushnell 10x50 (for beach) Garrett 10x50 classics (for Sylvia), Zhumell 80x20 on their Pro tripod(cuz they were cheap and sylvia digs 'em),  1.75 readers (so I can find the other stuff)

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Posted by RHONDA on Wednesday, September 14, 2011 3:39 PM

Thank you so much Dave for this great information, which will be 

of real use to me and anyone who uses binoculars.

Rhonda.

SkyQuest XX14i..Tasco Luminova 40-114675.. Meade My Sky Guide..Strathspey 25x100mm..Pentax 20x60..Celestron 15x70     Bushnell 10x50..Strathspey 10x50..Bushnell 8x42..Yashica 6x30..Exp.Scientific Eyepieces 9mm.14mm.20mm..Orion10mm.35m   Sirius Plossl 4mm. 25mm.. Televue Big Barlow.. Hotech Laser Collimator

 

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Posted by Mike_Spann on Wednesday, September 14, 2011 5:10 PM

Dave,

Excellent recommendations on binocular observing books. I own all four. How do you find the time to write all of your posts on the varied sites? It must be like a full time job for you.

My Latin is a little rusty. "What is a quick translation of your second quotation? "Fere libenter homines id quod volunt credunt."

Regards and clear skies,

Mike Spann

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Posted by DaveMitsky on Wednesday, September 14, 2011 5:32 PM

Men readily believe what they want to believe is one translation.

Dave Mitsky

Sic itur ad astra!

Chance favors the prepared mind.

A man is a small thing, and the night is very large and full of wonders.

  • Member since
    September, 2011
Posted by Joseph A'Hearn LC on Monday, September 19, 2011 6:31 PM

Binoculars are much easier and quicker to set up than telescopes, and in only a couple of seconds you can locate what you want to look at. I reserve telescope use for special occasions, but on any clear night I can take the binoculars outside for about 15 minutes and just gaze with wonder at the beauty of a starry night. It's a great way to relax before bedtime.

After that introduction, I just want to say that the tips given here are quite thorough, with a good amount of links, and I want to thank the one who posted this. Perhaps later I can comment more.

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Posted by Scooby on Tuesday, November 01, 2011 7:53 AM

Hello Dave,

In answer to another post you suggested that the 10 x 50 binoculars would be suitable as a first set, however, I noticed the following in the above post:

" People who must wear eyeglasses while observing may want to look for a binocular with at least 14mm of eye relief. "

I would need to wear glasses whilst observing. This may seem like a daft question, but how does the above translate into the size of binoculars I should consider? Or would the 10 x 50's still be the best bet? Also, I'm mid-50's - age seems to also make a difference on choice. For a fleeting moment there I naively thought I knew what I was doing!

Kind regards,  Sue

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Posted by Genesis 1:1 on Tuesday, November 01, 2011 12:37 PM

Hi Sue,

Sorry that I could not respond sooner.

 Astronomy.com made some changes on their website which affected my password for the past  three weeks and I was finally able to get it cleared up.

Here's something that you might be interested in reading.

http://www.cloudynights.com/item.php?item_id=1410

Most companies selling 10x50 binoculars should also have some kind of  specifications information by which you can check out the eye relief of a specific model for use with your eyeglasses. 

Low magnification binoculars (6x-9x) are wonderful for handheld viewing because they minimize hand shake.

On the other side of the coin, low magnification binoculars (6x-9x) do not go very deep, as in Deep Space Objects, and only allow you to see pinpoints of light, for the most part, with few exceptions, especially in locations where light pollution is a problem. If you will be stargazing at a Dark Site away from city light pollution a 10x50 is a good binocular for a beginner.

If you can afford an entry level tripod & pan head, so that you can mount a medium magnification (15x) binocular, you will be able to see more celestial targets, as you increase magnification.

Take a look at this magnification chart, especially the part posted by Stephen Saber.

http://cs.astronomy.com/asycs/forums/t/37448.aspx

In response to your ealier inquiry about the Celestron SkyMaster 25x70......I would not recommend it to you at this time.

Stan

Nikon7x35GoldSentinel 9.3*+Pentax8x40PCFWPII+MinoxBD10x44BP

FujinonFMTRSX7x50+Nikon10x50GoldSentinel+Pentax12x50PCFWPII

Vixen8x56Geoma+Fujinon12x60HB+Pentax16x60PCFWP

Pentax20x60PCFWP+Pentax20x60PCFWPII+Tento20x60USSR

Orion12x63MiniGiant+Spectrum I 20x65+Orion15x70LittleGiant II

Orion20x70LittleGiant II+Orion16x80Giant+Orion30x80MEGAView

Barska30x80X-Trail+BurgessOptical20x90Series II

Stan~Rocky Mountain High ColoradoGeeked

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Posted by BAZ PEARCE on Tuesday, November 01, 2011 12:54 PM

My tip for reducing unintentional movement when hand-holding binos is to adopt the stance of a dart thrower. Instead of standing with legs evenly spaced, which can lead to body sway. Lean into your best balancing hip, sometimes the opposite to your strongest kicking foot but mostly strongest throwing arm. Being left footed and right handed strength-wise. I lean slightly to the right. If you have something solid to rest your elbows on helps further.

Baz.

British weather don't half suck!

Celestron Astromaster 130 EQ, 80mm utilityscope.

6mm K, Celestron 10mm, 15mm OMNI, 12, 20, 25mm Meade MA EPs. APO 3 speed Barlow lens.

Solar, Light pollution, 11, 12, 23A ,82A Baader ir/uv cut filters.

Philips SPC880NC webam with 1.25" adapter, 0.6 reducer 10X50, 12X50 (BAK-4) sports bino

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Posted by DaveMitsky on Tuesday, November 01, 2011 1:20 PM

Scooby

Hello Dave,

In answer to another post you suggested that the 10 x 50 binoculars would be suitable as a first set, however, I noticed the following in the above post:

" People who must wear eyeglasses while observing may want to look for a binocular with at least 14mm of eye relief. "

I would need to wear glasses whilst observing. This may seem like a daft question, but how does the above translate into the size of binoculars I should consider? Or would the 10 x 50's still be the best bet? Also, I'm mid-50's - age seems to also make a difference on choice. For a fleeting moment there I naively thought I knew what I was doing!

Kind regards,  Sue

 

Sue,.

As Stan said, you should check the eye relief spec on a particular model. However, unless you suffer from severe astigmatism, you may be able to focus to correct for your vision without wearing glasses.  It's a hassle to have to switch back and forth between eyeglasses and a binocular but it can be done. 

http://www.bestbinocularsreviews.com/long-eye-relief-binoculars.php

The entrance pupil of the eye decreases in size from about 7mm to 5mm or less as one ages. Beyond age 40 or so, it will probably be around 5mm.  A 10x50 binocular has an appropriate exit pupil (aperture/magnification) of 5mm.

http://www.assa.org.au/articles/binoculars/

A tripod and pan head is serviceable for "giant" binoculars but a binocular mount or guider is far superior.  Using one limits portability and, of course, drives up cost considerably.

http://astunit.com/tonkinsastro/binoculars/binomount.htm

Dave Mitsky

Sic itur ad astra!

Chance favors the prepared mind.

A man is a small thing, and the night is very large and full of wonders.

  • Member since
    November, 2006
Posted by Genesis 1:1 on Tuesday, November 01, 2011 7:20 PM

Sue,

Here's some additional info, read it slowly, do the best you can.

http://www.cloudynights.com/item.php?item_id=1770

link

Nikon7x35GoldSentinel 9.3*+Pentax8x40PCFWPII+MinoxBD10x44BP

FujinonFMTRSX7x50+Nikon10x50GoldSentinel+Pentax12x50PCFWPII

Vixen8x56Geoma+Fujinon12x60HB+Pentax16x60PCFWP

Pentax20x60PCFWP+Pentax20x60PCFWPII+Tento20x60USSR

Orion12x63MiniGiant+Spectrum I 20x65+Orion15x70LittleGiant II

Orion20x70LittleGiant II+Orion16x80Giant+Orion30x80MEGAView

Barska30x80X-Trail+BurgessOptical20x90Series II

Stan~Rocky Mountain High ColoradoGeeked

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Posted by Scooby on Wednesday, November 02, 2011 5:17 AM

Dave & Stan,

Many thanks for all your help - much appreciated.  I'm off work today so I'm going to have a read through all the links you've suggested - a more informed decision is always preferable. However, I think in the end I'll just have to go for it - we learn by our mistakes, but hopefully, armed with the bit of knowledge I'll have gained, it won't be too big a one. Thanks again.

Kind regards,   Sue 

 

Baz,

I was quite a mean darts player in my youth - stance noted.

Kind regards, Sue

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Posted by DaveMitsky on Wednesday, November 02, 2011 12:39 PM

Sue,

You're welcome.

Dave Mitsky

Sic itur ad astra!

Chance favors the prepared mind.

A man is a small thing, and the night is very large and full of wonders.

  • Member since
    November, 2006
Posted by Genesis 1:1 on Wednesday, November 02, 2011 5:40 PM

Sue,

Glad to be of assistance.

Stan

Nikon7x35GoldSentinel 9.3*+Pentax8x40PCFWPII+MinoxBD10x44BP

FujinonFMTRSX7x50+Nikon10x50GoldSentinel+Pentax12x50PCFWPII

Vixen8x56Geoma+Fujinon12x60HB+Pentax16x60PCFWP

Pentax20x60PCFWP+Pentax20x60PCFWPII+Tento20x60USSR

Orion12x63MiniGiant+Spectrum I 20x65+Orion15x70LittleGiant II

Orion20x70LittleGiant II+Orion16x80Giant+Orion30x80MEGAView

Barska30x80X-Trail+BurgessOptical20x90Series II

Stan~Rocky Mountain High ColoradoGeeked

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Posted by Taurus12 on Tuesday, November 08, 2011 10:33 PM

Scooby,

I have binos bushnell 16x50. They work very well for me. I am also mid 50s and eyes are terrible. I see very good with my binos. Telscope is not working so I am back to binos for a while. Hope you find what your looking for. The night sky is an amazing sight.

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Posted by DaveMitsky on Friday, May 11, 2012 3:55 PM

Bump.

Sic itur ad astra!

Chance favors the prepared mind.

A man is a small thing, and the night is very large and full of wonders.

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  • From: Montreal
Posted by WhenTheDarkFalls on Saturday, June 02, 2012 6:09 PM

Hi all,

Thanks for the info. I just want to ask few questions:

1. what is the best specifications for a binoculars to be used in a city with high light pollution (I live in Montreal).

2. Isn't a binoculars with 70mm lens better in this case, in that it can let through more star light?

3. Do all binoculars come in with the ability to be mounted on tripods? or only few of them do?

Thanks

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Posted by DaveMitsky on Sunday, June 03, 2012 3:12 AM

In a light-polluted area, a binocular with a smaller exit pupil (5mm or less) will more likely match the entrance pupils of the observer's less-than-fully-dark-adapted eyes.  A 15x70 binocular has an exit pupil of  approximately 4.7mm.

Many, if not all, binoculars have 1/4"-20 tripod-mounting capability.

Dave Mitsky

Sic itur ad astra!

Chance favors the prepared mind.

A man is a small thing, and the night is very large and full of wonders.

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Posted by DaveMitsky on Saturday, July 07, 2012 12:17 PM

Bump

Sic itur ad astra!

Chance favors the prepared mind.

A man is a small thing, and the night is very large and full of wonders.

  • Member since
    October, 2012
Posted by TahoeNoob on Wednesday, October 17, 2012 2:54 PM

Greetings to all!  (First message here.  I've been lurking for only about a week.)

I'm new to all of this, but I would like to learn about astronomy.  Eventually, I'd like to get a dobsonian telescope, but first I think it would be smart to learn the sky's stars, constellations, and DSOs.  (At this point, I can point out the Big Dipper, Little Dipper, and Orion's belt... that's about it!  As you can see, I'm VERY new!  I DO, however, remember getting my first telescope when I was about 12 years old... and getting my first look at Saturn!)  

Anyway, I'm thinking that the best place for me to start is with some good books (which I just ordered from Amazon) and a good pair of binoculars. 

I read, in one of the other threads, that it helps to measure the diameter of your pupil when it's dark, but that all sounds way too complicated to me!  (Even if it is done with allen wrenches!  (???))

So... here's my question:  Can anybody tell me if this pair of binoculars would be a good place for a mid-fifty year old person to start in the hobby of astronomy?  The price seems cheap to me, but if they're good binoculars they're good binoculars! 

http://www.telescope.com/Binoculars/Astronomy-Binoculars/Bushnell-Legacy-10x50-Waterproof-Binoculars/pc/-1/c/5/sc/72/p/101469.uts

Any help would be greatly appreciated!  Thank you very much!

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Posted by Antitax on Wednesday, October 17, 2012 6:10 PM

Hi. You don't need to measure your pupils' diameter. All 10x50mm have a 5mm exit pupil that will match anyone's eye pupil in the dark cause it's at least 5mm. The model you linked has the right features: more transparent BaK-4 prisms, full multicoatings, and waterproofing, which should also mean they're purged from water vapor that could condense on the optics in the cold. The viewing field is 6.5°, the most you can find in a 10x binoc, and eye relief is 18mm, within the 14 to 18mm comfortable range.

Some people's pupils open up to 7mm or 8mm depending on age and darkness but as long as the instrument's exit pupil is smaller than your eyes' entry pupil all the light gets through. Besides making that measurement is awkward and maybe hasardous, I don't know how it's done. Regardless of age, everyone's iris opens up to at least 5mm in total or near-total obscurity according to studies. So a binoc with a 5mm (diameter divided by magnification) exit pupil is sure to fit.

$90 is not cheap, it's unexpensive as 10x50's go. A cheap one would be in the $40-$50's and not be waterproof or fully multi-coated against light scatter, or the prisms would be inferior BK-7 glass.

How is the sky in your area?

TS 8x40 Wildlife, 10x50 Marine/Fujinon 16x70/TS 80mm triplet, 6x30 finder, EQ-3 mount, TS 2" 99% diagonal/Celestron C5+ and 6x30 finder, DIY tripod/5" Bahtinov/12" GSO dob, 8x50 finder/Meade 2" 24mm 82°/Hyperion 24,13,10mm 68°/TS Expanse 17mm 70°/SW 7mm Panorama 82°/Ultima 2x barlow/Astronomik UHC-E filter/Baader O-III/Astro Solar 5" & 80mm filters/Sky Atlas 2000/Rükl's Moon Atlas/Canon 400D/5mW green laser

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Posted by TahoeNoob on Wednesday, October 17, 2012 7:17 PM

Anti,

Thank you very much for your reply.

I hadn't thought about the condensation issue.  In the winter my area gets quite cold and I can see myself taking my binoculars outside from inside the warm house.  (Unless I take to storing them in my car.)  This being the case, maybe waterproof binoculars are more than just a nice "feature."  Perhaps they're required?

I live sort of near a small city, and there is some light bleed-over... but I don't think it's too bad.  I'm sure there are people with a lot worse!  (I have neighbors but, if need be, I can shoot out their annoying outside "security" light.  They're never here anyway!  Confused  Or, it wouldn't be that hard for me to drive a short distance to get to a very dark area with an almost full view of the whole sky... and remain out of jail.)

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Posted by TahoeNoob on Wednesday, October 17, 2012 11:10 PM

Hmmmm, I guess I figured out that I posted my question in the wrong forum.  It probably should've gone in the Equipment/Binoculars forum.  Sorry about that; I guess that's why I'm a noob.

Anyway, after doing a lot of looking around... I've decided that I'll probably buy whichever of these two binoculars is the better deal for the money:

http://www.telescope.com/Binoculars/Astronomy-Binoculars/Bushnell-Legacy-10x50-Waterproof-Binoculars/pc/-1/c/5/sc/72/p/101469.uts

http://www.amazon.com/Pentax-65808-10x50-Waterproof-Binocular/dp/B00076QVQ4/ref=sr_1_23?ie=UTF8&qid=1350524375&sr=8-23&keywords=10x50+binoculars

I'll have to accept your advice as to which is the better deal.  :)

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Posted by Genesis 1:1 on Thursday, October 18, 2012 10:31 AM

Tahoe,

The Bushnell Legacy 10x50 should be a nice beginners binocular.

Here's a link for you to read which gives you some info about 10x50 binoculars for stargazing.

www.cloudynights.com/item.php

Other favorites for beginners would be the Nikon Action Extreme as well as the Pentax PCF WP II binos.

www.cloudynights.com/.../nikon.pdf

Stan

Nikon7x35GoldSentinel 9.3*+Pentax8x40PCFWPII+MinoxBD10x44BP

FujinonFMTRSX7x50+Nikon10x50GoldSentinel+Pentax12x50PCFWPII

Vixen8x56Geoma+Fujinon12x60HB+Pentax16x60PCFWP

Pentax20x60PCFWP+Pentax20x60PCFWPII+Tento20x60USSR

Orion12x63MiniGiant+Spectrum I 20x65+Orion15x70LittleGiant II

Orion20x70LittleGiant II+Orion16x80Giant+Orion30x80MEGAView

Barska30x80X-Trail+BurgessOptical20x90Series II

Stan~Rocky Mountain High ColoradoGeeked

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Posted by TahoeNoob on Thursday, October 18, 2012 11:45 AM

Thank you.  I'll be buying the Pentax binoculars in about 10 days.  

I think they'll work out very well for me!  

Here's one more review, for those that come along after me:

www.cloudynights.com/item.php

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Posted by Antitax on Thursday, October 18, 2012 3:21 PM

I knew Genesis would come and advise you, Tahoe. Although I used 35 or 36 binocs I never observed with a Pentax PCF. They have a narrower field than most 10x50's but it's sharp almost to the very edge, as all users remark.

TS 8x40 Wildlife, 10x50 Marine/Fujinon 16x70/TS 80mm triplet, 6x30 finder, EQ-3 mount, TS 2" 99% diagonal/Celestron C5+ and 6x30 finder, DIY tripod/5" Bahtinov/12" GSO dob, 8x50 finder/Meade 2" 24mm 82°/Hyperion 24,13,10mm 68°/TS Expanse 17mm 70°/SW 7mm Panorama 82°/Ultima 2x barlow/Astronomik UHC-E filter/Baader O-III/Astro Solar 5" & 80mm filters/Sky Atlas 2000/Rükl's Moon Atlas/Canon 400D/5mW green laser

  • Member since
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Posted by Genesis 1:1 on Thursday, October 18, 2012 4:33 PM

Tahoe,

Please be sure and let us know what you think of your Pentax 10x50 PCF WP II binocular.

Nikon7x35GoldSentinel 9.3*+Pentax8x40PCFWPII+MinoxBD10x44BP

FujinonFMTRSX7x50+Nikon10x50GoldSentinel+Pentax12x50PCFWPII

Vixen8x56Geoma+Fujinon12x60HB+Pentax16x60PCFWP

Pentax20x60PCFWP+Pentax20x60PCFWPII+Tento20x60USSR

Orion12x63MiniGiant+Spectrum I 20x65+Orion15x70LittleGiant II

Orion20x70LittleGiant II+Orion16x80Giant+Orion30x80MEGAView

Barska30x80X-Trail+BurgessOptical20x90Series II

Stan~Rocky Mountain High ColoradoGeeked

  • Member since
    November, 2006
Posted by Genesis 1:1 on Thursday, October 18, 2012 4:41 PM

Antitax,

Do you still own all 35-36 binoculars?

I had to stop buying binoculars because I'm running low on space to store the binoculars & the boxes, not to mention tripods & other accessories.

Plus, I also own a Celestron C5 spotting scope & a number of eyepieces.

(Over the years I have given away several binoculars as well).

Not to mention the fact that my wife was ready to have me committed to an Asylum.  8>{

Perhaps one of these days you could list some of your binoculars in your profile/biography.

Stan

Nikon7x35GoldSentinel 9.3*+Pentax8x40PCFWPII+MinoxBD10x44BP

FujinonFMTRSX7x50+Nikon10x50GoldSentinel+Pentax12x50PCFWPII

Vixen8x56Geoma+Fujinon12x60HB+Pentax16x60PCFWP

Pentax20x60PCFWP+Pentax20x60PCFWPII+Tento20x60USSR

Orion12x63MiniGiant+Spectrum I 20x65+Orion15x70LittleGiant II

Orion20x70LittleGiant II+Orion16x80Giant+Orion30x80MEGAView

Barska30x80X-Trail+BurgessOptical20x90Series II

Stan~Rocky Mountain High ColoradoGeeked

  • Member since
    March, 2008
Posted by Antitax on Thursday, October 18, 2012 5:01 PM

No, no, I didn't own all those binocs. I owned seven other binocs before I settled on the three keepers I have now. 35 or 36 is the total number I looked through over the years; some were junk, some were toys, one was a Leica, some were skewy. All my current gear is listed in my signature. I ebayed two eyepieces and some filters, and I'm about to order a 68° 24mm to replace the 50° 25mm I used to have.

I could never store that many cases, Stan. I'm even going to give away my 21-year collection of Astronomy mags to free some space for the 80mm apo I should get next month. I have set out to list all my gear because it's a bit of guidance for newbies, and shows everyone who I am as an observer. (Although I often use my club's 11-incher without owning it personally).

TS 8x40 Wildlife, 10x50 Marine/Fujinon 16x70/TS 80mm triplet, 6x30 finder, EQ-3 mount, TS 2" 99% diagonal/Celestron C5+ and 6x30 finder, DIY tripod/5" Bahtinov/12" GSO dob, 8x50 finder/Meade 2" 24mm 82°/Hyperion 24,13,10mm 68°/TS Expanse 17mm 70°/SW 7mm Panorama 82°/Ultima 2x barlow/Astronomik UHC-E filter/Baader O-III/Astro Solar 5" & 80mm filters/Sky Atlas 2000/Rükl's Moon Atlas/Canon 400D/5mW green laser

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