Perseus and his buddies!

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  • Member since
    November, 2009
Perseus and his buddies!
Posted by Poppa Chris on Sunday, August 11, 2013 6:28 AM

Just walked in from another morning with my binos.  The Perseids did well by me this AM.  I was slovenly laying in bed until 4:30 but got outside by 4:45 to find that elusive rarity of a cloudless sky and a very still atmosphere. If I had to guess, I'd mark seeing down as "excellent" with transparency as "very good".  A rare night indeed as even the mosquitos were still asleep and were no bother at all for a change. 

Since it was still early enough that morning twilight hadn't kicked in, I walked around back to my patio and dropped into a metal rocker, propped my feet up on a small metal end table and just kicked back to enjoy the show. Perseus was not yet at the meridian so I felt like I was well timed. As I was settling in I scanned about a bit with the binos for the usual suspects.  M31 was a fine view this morning so I was lingering there trying my averted vision to see how much of this huge target I could see.  Quite a lot actually.  It visually drove home the point of why I can never get anywhere near all of it in the field of view of my telescope, Then POW! right across my bino view was Perseid number 1 for the morning. 

Setting the binos down for a bit, I just let my eyes wander around for another 5-10 minutes during which I picked up 2 or 3 more streakers.  So far so good.

For the next 25-30 minutes or so, I alternated a bit of spotting targets like the Double Cluster, the Pleiades, the Hyades, M42 in Orion, (which was another great view by the way), Jupiter and 3 of the Jovian moons, and even Mars.  All for short visits so I could keep my naked eye "wide field" scan in action.  During this time I managed to bag a total of 17 Perseids, two of which were very bright and long.  As a little icing on the cake I even followed a satellite fly-by with the binos until it hit my tree line to the south.

By 5:50, dawn was getting so near that most of the stars were fading out of sight with only the very brightest remaining.   So, my dear astro-friends, I strolled back in to the house to immediately sit down to my computer to share this fine morning with you.  Big Smile 

---Poppa Chris---

Denham Springs, Louisiana USA

"Second star to the right - Then straight on until morning!" - Peter Pan

Celestron CPC1100GPS (XLT) - 279mm aperature, 2800mm Focal length. (f10) Celestron Ultima LX (70deg AFOV) Eyepieces 32mm thru 5mm, Canon EOS Rebel T2i DSLR, Backyard EOS imaging software, Orion Star Shoot Planetary Imager IV, Celestron Skymaster 15x70 binoculars

 

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  • Member since
    July, 2001
  • From: PA, USA, Earth Moderator
Posted by DaveMitsky on Sunday, August 11, 2013 11:50 AM

That's not a bad total for a half hour over a day before the peak of the shower.

The sky here was partly to mostly cloudy this morning so I didn't bother trying to see any Perseids but I did manage to catch a -8 magnitude Iridium flare from Iridium 7 at 4:27 a.m. EDT.

Dave Mitsky

Sic itur ad astra!

Chance favors the prepared mind.

A man is a small thing, and the night is very large and full of wonders.

  • Member since
    November, 2009
Posted by Poppa Chris on Sunday, August 11, 2013 2:01 PM

Thanks.  Just to be accurate, the total of 17 were seen from approx. 4:45AM CDT thru 5:50AM  a little over an hour.  But I didn't see any of them in the last 10 or so, therefore I guess it should be claimed as under a hour.  

After so many months of dismal observing conditions it was a definitely pleasant surprise to have such a great sky in the summer.  Usually, I would have to wait until late autumn before anything like it would be available to me down here.

---Poppa Chris---

Denham Springs, Louisiana USA

"Second star to the right - Then straight on until morning!" - Peter Pan

Celestron CPC1100GPS (XLT) - 279mm aperature, 2800mm Focal length. (f10) Celestron Ultima LX (70deg AFOV) Eyepieces 32mm thru 5mm, Canon EOS Rebel T2i DSLR, Backyard EOS imaging software, Orion Star Shoot Planetary Imager IV, Celestron Skymaster 15x70 binoculars

 

  • Member since
    November, 2009
Posted by Poppa Chris on Monday, August 12, 2013 6:20 AM

In a much shorter period this morning (5:30 - 5:45) I managed to up my count for this year's Perseids from 17 to 20. Conditions weren't as good as yesterday. Clear of clouds, but a bit hazy and very humid. LP was an order of magnitude worse because of it.

---Poppa Chris---

Denham Springs, Louisiana USA

"Second star to the right - Then straight on until morning!" - Peter Pan

Celestron CPC1100GPS (XLT) - 279mm aperature, 2800mm Focal length. (f10) Celestron Ultima LX (70deg AFOV) Eyepieces 32mm thru 5mm, Canon EOS Rebel T2i DSLR, Backyard EOS imaging software, Orion Star Shoot Planetary Imager IV, Celestron Skymaster 15x70 binoculars

 

  • Member since
    March, 2009
Posted by pastorg on Tuesday, August 13, 2013 5:25 PM

Nice report Chris!  :)

Zhumell Z12 Dob, Celestron Omni XLT 102mm refractor on CG-4 Mount,  Meade AZ70 refractor, Celestron Ultima 2X Barlow 1.25, Telrad with 4 3/8 Riser, Zhumell Skyglow Filter, Zhumell OIII Filter, Baader UHC-S Filter, Meade ND96 Moon Filter, Baader Planetarium Hyperion 21mm, 13mm, 8mm and 5mm eyepieces, Meade 9mm and 25mm Plossls, Zhumell 9mm Plossl and 2 inch 30mm SWA,  6mm Orion Expanse and Pentax 10 x 50 PCF WP ll Binos

  • Member since
    November, 2009
Posted by Poppa Chris on Tuesday, August 13, 2013 7:11 PM

Thanks!

---Poppa Chris---

Denham Springs, Louisiana USA

"Second star to the right - Then straight on until morning!" - Peter Pan

Celestron CPC1100GPS (XLT) - 279mm aperature, 2800mm Focal length. (f10) Celestron Ultima LX (70deg AFOV) Eyepieces 32mm thru 5mm, Canon EOS Rebel T2i DSLR, Backyard EOS imaging software, Orion Star Shoot Planetary Imager IV, Celestron Skymaster 15x70 binoculars

 

  • Member since
    October, 2007
Posted by Aratus on Wednesday, August 14, 2013 4:12 AM

A morning to remember!   It is good when the weather co-operates for a change.    A foretaste of winter objects too.  It is nice to know that no one has taken them away while we weren't looking!   M31 is amazing.  It not only looks interesting, but when you just consider how far away it is . . . .   Truly awesome!

Aratus

Location:  North West Devon, UK

-------------------------------------------------

Celestron Nexstar8i (8" SCT).

Celestron Skymaster binoculars 15x70

Other:0.63 & 0.33 correctors. X2 & X4 barlow.

Imagers: Meade DSI & Celestron NexImage.  Canon EOS 550D

 

 

  • Member since
    April, 2012
  • From: North Carolina east coast USA
Posted by stepping beyond on Tuesday, August 27, 2013 5:44 PM

Most excellent Chris, I'm very excited that you got your" view on".

  • Member since
    August, 2013
Posted by Brucey on Wednesday, September 04, 2013 5:56 PM
Sounds like a great start to the day. What binos did you use.
  • Member since
    November, 2009
Posted by Poppa Chris on Wednesday, September 04, 2013 9:32 PM

I use Celestron Skymaster 15x70s.  At under $70 it's the best bang for the buck in all of astronomy in my opinion.  But for hunting meteors nothing beats naked eyes.

---Poppa Chris---

Denham Springs, Louisiana USA

"Second star to the right - Then straight on until morning!" - Peter Pan

Celestron CPC1100GPS (XLT) - 279mm aperature, 2800mm Focal length. (f10) Celestron Ultima LX (70deg AFOV) Eyepieces 32mm thru 5mm, Canon EOS Rebel T2i DSLR, Backyard EOS imaging software, Orion Star Shoot Planetary Imager IV, Celestron Skymaster 15x70 binoculars

 

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