A Bright Early Morning Comet

632 views
3 replies
1 rating 2 rating 3 rating 4 rating 5 rating
Moderator
  • Member since
    July, 2001
  • From: PA, USA, Earth Moderator
A Bright Early Morning Comet
Posted by DaveMitsky on Sunday, November 10, 2013 2:24 PM

Much to my surprise, the sky cleared and I was able to see Comet Lovejoy through a 10x50 Celestron Ultima binocular from my red zone backyard early this morning. 

C/2013 R1 (Lovejoy) was located a bit northeast of M44 and appeared as a more-or-less circular patch of nebulosity.  

This comet is performing better than expected and is currently putting Comet ISON to shame.  It has been seen naked-eye from dark sites.  

I also observed M35, M36, M37, M41, M42 and the Sword of Orion, M44, Collinder 70, and the Hyades before the clouds returned. 

Browse http://freestarcharts.com/index.php/19-news-and-current-events/218-comet-lovejoy-c-2013-r1-visible-with-binoculars and http://cometchasing.skyhound.com/comets/2013_R1.pdf for finder charts.

For more on the comet, consult the following sites:

https://www.heavens-above.com/comet.aspx?cid=C%2F2013%20R1&lat=0&lng=0&loc=Unspecified&alt=0&tz=UCT

http://spaceweathergallery.com/indiv_upload.php?upload_id=89424&PHPSESSID=nis874ea9fv7etvhakj0tnj4j2 (image)

http://www.skyandtelescope.com/observing/highlights/The-Other-Great-Morning-Comet-231157211.html

http://scully.cfa.harvard.edu/cgi-bin/returnprepeph.cgi?d=c&o=CK13R010 (ephemeris)

http://cometchasing.skyhound.com/

http://theskylive.com/lovejoy-tracker

Dave Mitsky

Sic itur ad astra!

Chance favors the prepared mind.

A man is a small thing, and the night is very large and full of wonders.

  • Member since
    October, 2013
Posted by Tony383 on Sunday, November 10, 2013 4:57 PM

Dave, Last weekend November 3rd I was able to make out Comet Lovejoy with 7x35 Nikons, and the view in the dob was pretty good.  Large coma, and to me looked spherical (I could barely make out a tail either through my imagination or averted vision).  I waited until later to observe ISON and it was not very impressive compared with Lovejoy.

Unfortunately, I wasn't able to do any imaging this weekend as I had power issues at the DSS.  Glad you were able to get some good views.  

"The problem with quotes on the internet is that it is hard to determine whether they are genuine"  Abraham Lincoln

Dobsonian, 72mm Astro-Tech ED refractor, a bunch of eyepieces, a couple of filters, a DSLR and german equatorial mount, binoculars

Moderator
  • Member since
    July, 2001
  • From: PA, USA, Earth Moderator
Posted by DaveMitsky on Monday, November 11, 2013 1:07 AM

Tony,

Thanks.  I read your report at the time.  

Comet Lovejoy may get almost as bright as fourth magnitude and is moving rapidly.

The coma of Comet C/2012 X1 (LINEAR) has apparently expanded to the point that it is difficult to see telescopically.

Dave Mitsky

Sic itur ad astra!

Chance favors the prepared mind.

A man is a small thing, and the night is very large and full of wonders.

Moderator
  • Member since
    July, 2001
  • From: PA, USA, Earth Moderator
Posted by DaveMitsky on Monday, November 11, 2013 3:45 PM

The sky was far more transparent this morning.  The winds were calm and the temperature was 39 degrees Fahrenheit (4 degrees Celsius).

This time I used 10x50 Celestron Ultima and 15x70 Burgess Optical binoculars to observe C/2013 R1 (Lovejoy), Jupiter, and a number of deep-sky objects.  The 15x70s were a bit difficult to hold with one hand but I managed.

Comet Lovejoy had progressed on its northeastward course and was near the fourth-magnitude star Kappa Leonis.  It was easily visible through the 15x70s.

DSOs observed included M35, M36, M37, M38, M41, M42 and the Sword of Orion, M44, M45, M46, M47, M67, NGC 2244, NGC 2264, Collinder 65, Collinder 69, Collinder 70, and the Hyades.  M46 was the most difficult object to see from my light-polluted backyard.

Dave Mitsky

Sic itur ad astra!

Chance favors the prepared mind.

A man is a small thing, and the night is very large and full of wonders.

Join our Community!

Our community is FREE to join. To participate you must either login or register for an account.

ADVERTISEMENT

FREE EMAIL NEWSLETTER

Receive news, sky-event information, observing tips, and more from Astronomy's weekly email newsletter.

ADVERTISEMENT
ADVERTISEMENT
Find us on Facebook

Loading...