AWESOME TOTALLY

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  • Member since
    April, 2012
  • From: North Carolina east coast USA
AWESOME TOTALLY
Posted by stepping beyond on Friday, September 27, 2013 1:14 PM

Anyone couldn't of asked for much better conditions in seeing last night. I've been staying on Andromeda trying to keep my log correct as to times and location of certain "TREATS" for the best viewing. Before I went to documenting , I had my grab n go eq 80 refractor out attempting to get it aligned from the back yard and Ieven had that worthless star pointer on it this time, instead of the Telrad reflex sight. Well lets see where should I start , for a hour before sunset spent my valuable time messing with this toy and finally put the Telrad back on. "SMOOTH" Oh Yea! I got it aligned I think , at least the best that I could considering my circumstances. WOOHOO! WOOHOO ! I had Venus in the 20mm ep and tonight I'l lstart off trying to track once I get  out there and hopefully "BOOYAH" and video. I moved over to the DSO HUNTER Z10 and with a 2"16mm Z100 I caught m19 in the eyepiece j wonderfully clear and at a mag. of 7.2 one of the brighter clusters that I've viewed. I moved my Cannon up 1/2 or maybe 1 degree and a little West I came across a ngc 6284 dimmer than the previous but, still a nice view even with the Z100 9mm. I retracked where I started best I could and kept moving the Cannon South and "Pow" I came across ngc 6293 It's claimed to be a 8.2 mag but, it didn't look anydifferent than the first Globular I observed. It's 10pm est time to check on the Andromeda Galaxy and it's satelite galaxy neighbor, I used my 2" ep's and at high , med. and low power , I had both in the eyepieces pretty cool I thought .What a night and a special fly by by something that I couldn't comprehend other than say it was a "U.F.O." zip and it wasn't in the satelite belt,wasn't hubble or the ISS I'd seen that earlier and this was tiny. WOOHOO moment once again.

  • Member since
    October, 2007
Posted by Aratus on Friday, September 27, 2013 5:09 PM

A nice collection of objects!     I use an old fashioned tape dictaphone to record the timings.   It saves trying to write things down, or memorising them.   There are plenty of solid state equivalents going quite cheaply.

Satellites don't actually inhabit a belt as such.   Their path is determined by their orbital inclination which can range from equatorial to polar.   I most often see ones in polar orbit, but they can cross at any angle. 

Aratus

Location:  North West Devon, UK

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Celestron Nexstar8i (8" SCT).

Celestron Skymaster binoculars 15x70

Other:0.63 & 0.33 correctors. X2 & X4 barlow.

Imagers: Meade DSI & Celestron NexImage.  Canon EOS 550D

 

 

  • Member since
    April, 2012
  • From: North Carolina east coast USA
Posted by stepping beyond on Saturday, September 28, 2013 8:31 AM

Thanks for that Aratus, I didn't mean to type that , I guess my mind was thinking of asteroids while I was posting. Anyways the object that zipped was more likely a meteor , it wasn't looking like a meteor though. I thoroughly enjoyed the past 2 nights out under the stars, I do like the recording option though . I might just look for my micro recorder that I used to use in college. It's around somewhere.

  • Member since
    October, 2007
Posted by Aratus on Sunday, September 29, 2013 3:45 AM

There shouldn't be too much difficulty in determining whether an object is a meteor, or a satellite.   Satellites move fairly slowly, and don't leave a trail.    They can easily be followed through binoculars.    Meteors move too quickly to be followed by binoculars, even if you had time to raise them to your eye!   There was one occasion when I observed a very slow moving meteor, to the point that I initially wondered if it was a low aircraft.  (I saw it burn up so I don't think it was!)   It was still moving faster than a satellite though.

Almost all asteroids move so slowly that you normally need to check its location each day to see any movement.  It is possible to record the movement of an asteroid over an hour through a telescope though.  

Aratus

Location:  North West Devon, UK

-------------------------------------------------

Celestron Nexstar8i (8" SCT).

Celestron Skymaster binoculars 15x70

Other:0.63 & 0.33 correctors. X2 & X4 barlow.

Imagers: Meade DSI & Celestron NexImage.  Canon EOS 550D

 

 

  • Member since
    April, 2012
  • From: North Carolina east coast USA
Posted by stepping beyond on Saturday, October 05, 2013 12:13 PM

You're pretty spot on that's what the best possible explanation, I get so overwhelmed that not all my post come out the way I want them to . I like the fact that now we can edit our posts but, I still look like an idiot sometimes. I'll assure you that I'm not an idiot , OI just need to not get so excited over a post.

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