Andromeda and neighbor

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  • Member since
    April, 2012
  • From: North Carolina east coast USA
Andromeda and neighbor
Posted by stepping beyond on Tuesday, September 10, 2013 12:33 PM

M31 and m32 was totally awesome from 11pm to 130 am . What a wonderfully exciting session with my lady Andromeda, My targets had climbed high into the night sky and the view from KM was priceless. If you could've only seen what I was observing, I poppin and jaw droppin stellar, Visible structure in both m31 and m32. I was using a 2" 30mm wide angle , 2" 9mm Z100, 1 1/4 " Omni barlow lens, 1 1/4 "  20mm and working my fine tunning the whole night long. I'm so excited about just being able to view the "Cosmos"

  • Member since
    March, 2009
Posted by pastorg on Tuesday, September 10, 2013 2:55 PM

Sounds like you had some really good seeing and transparency!  Those rare moments when both come together are amazing indeed!  

Clear skies!

pastorg

Zhumell Z12 Dob, Celestron Omni XLT 102mm refractor on CG-4 Mount,  Meade AZ70 refractor, Celestron Ultima 2X Barlow 1.25, Telrad with 4 3/8 Riser, Zhumell Skyglow Filter, Zhumell OIII Filter, Baader UHC-S Filter, Meade ND96 Moon Filter, Baader Planetarium Hyperion 21mm, 13mm, 8mm and 5mm eyepieces, Meade 9mm and 25mm Plossls, Zhumell 9mm Plossl and 2 inch 30mm SWA,  6mm Orion Expanse and Pentax 10 x 50 PCF WP ll Binos

  • Member since
    April, 2012
  • From: North Carolina east coast USA
Posted by stepping beyond on Tuesday, September 10, 2013 5:08 PM

Pastorg, yes indeed. It's not often enough, that a moment like this will become reality.. In all my years being an up lookker, this has happened only a few times. I said back then it'll probably not happen again. Well, anything is possible  when the atmosphere cooperates . I didn't even check the clear sky chart, there wrong more than there right. I check on the "Solar system objects" if I can see good detail then it's a messier hunt in my 2nd session. I also forgot to add a Paracorr T2 to my eps of choice for that night. I've found that the useful magnification changes with the elements, as does our gear. Last night cargo shorts , tank top. flip flops and no fan.

  • Member since
    October, 2007
Posted by Aratus on Thursday, September 12, 2013 9:59 AM

Andromeda Galaxy is a nice autumn friend.  I find it best in binoculars myself.  Thanks for the report.

Aratus

Location:  North West Devon, UK

-------------------------------------------------

Celestron Nexstar8i (8" SCT).

Celestron Skymaster binoculars 15x70

Other:0.63 & 0.33 correctors. X2 & X4 barlow.

Imagers: Meade DSI & Celestron NexImage.  Canon EOS 550D

 

 

  • Member since
    May, 2012
Posted by Starrancher on Friday, September 13, 2013 2:25 PM

The best view IMHO of M31 is at 31x . That'll get M32 and M110 (NGC205) nicely into the FOV .

Could you pick out the star cloud NGC206 ?

The invisible man 

  • Member since
    April, 2012
  • From: North Carolina east coast USA
Posted by stepping beyond on Saturday, September 14, 2013 9:49 AM

Only if maybe I new what I was looking for ?

  • Member since
    October, 2007
Posted by Aratus on Saturday, September 14, 2013 4:56 PM

NGC 206 is a giant star cluster actually inside the Andromeda galaxy.    It looks like a slightly brighter patch located to the right hand side of the visible galaxy disc.   Think of M31, M110  and NGC206 as a right angled triangle.  That will bring you to the right area.

Aratus

Location:  North West Devon, UK

-------------------------------------------------

Celestron Nexstar8i (8" SCT).

Celestron Skymaster binoculars 15x70

Other:0.63 & 0.33 correctors. X2 & X4 barlow.

Imagers: Meade DSI & Celestron NexImage.  Canon EOS 550D

 

 

  • Member since
    April, 2012
  • From: North Carolina east coast USA
Posted by stepping beyond on Saturday, September 14, 2013 5:51 PM

Always a learning experience with you fellas, I didn't know that.  I will definitely check on it tonight , the skies are so blue. It's going to be stellar.

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  • Member since
    July, 2001
  • From: PA, USA, Earth Moderator
Posted by DaveMitsky on Sunday, September 15, 2013 1:37 AM

The giantic star cloud NGC 206 is similar to the Milky Way's M24, only much larger.  It spans some 4,000 light years and is located in M31's southwestern spiral arm at 00h40m31.30s, +40°44'21.4".  

apod.nasa.gov/.../ap121024.html

messier.seds.org/.../m031_n206.html

www.narrowbandimaging.com/.../ngc206_map.jpg

Many globular clusters and large open clusters/stellar associations can also be observed in the Andromeda Galaxy.  Mayall II (M31-G1) is the brightest and easiest to detect globular cluster.  I've observed G1 and a number of other globulars in M31 using large apertures.

http://imgsrc.hubblesite.org/hu/db/2002/18/images/j/formats/large_web.jpg

www.geoandpat.com/GeorgesastroclustersG1.html

http://starmatt.com/gallery/astro/m31b.html

www.astronomy-mall.com/.../gcm31.htm

Dave Mitsky

Sic itur ad astra!

Chance favors the prepared mind.

A man is a small thing, and the night is very large and full of wonders.

Moderator
  • Member since
    July, 2001
  • From: PA, USA, Earth Moderator
Posted by DaveMitsky on Sunday, September 15, 2013 2:32 AM

I've observed M31 countless times with optics, using everything from low-power binoculars to telescopes exceeding 20 inches of aperture.  

My best all-time view was through a homemade Dob with a rather unusual aperture of 18.5 inches. Also unusual was the fact that it was set up for fairly low-power (for that aperture) binoviewing. Seeing M31 through the Denkmeier binoviewer under the dark skies of Cherry Springs State Park, before fracking came to Pennsylvania, was an incredible experience.

I've also had some fantastic views of M31 through rich-field telescopes ranging from 80 to150mm in size, some of which were equipped with binoviewers.  One of the most memorable was during the 2007 Stellafane ATM convention when I had the opportunity to use a 13mm Tele Vue Ethos before it went on the market.  M31 was simply spectacular through Al Nagler's personal 127mm  f/5.2 Tele Vue TV-127 apochromat and the 13mm Ethos.

stellafane.org/.../reports.html

http://www.company7.com/televue/telescopes/tv127.html

My 101mm f/5.4 Tele Vue TV-101 apochromat does a great job on M31 when paired with a Tele Ethos or Nagler or an Explore Scientific 82 or 100 degree AFOV ocular.

Dave Mitsky

Sic itur ad astra!

Chance favors the prepared mind.

A man is a small thing, and the night is very large and full of wonders.

  • Member since
    April, 2012
  • From: North Carolina east coast USA
Posted by stepping beyond on Sunday, September 15, 2013 12:12 PM

Dave that's awesome info , I just can't get enough of the Andromeda region. Last night was another wonderful night in Andromeda around 1030pm -1am.

  • Member since
    April, 2012
  • From: North Carolina east coast USA
Posted by stepping beyond on Sunday, September 15, 2013 1:36 PM

Aratus that might have been the cigar I was referring to on the edge ofthe great cloud?

  • Member since
    April, 2012
  • From: North Carolina east coast USA
Posted by stepping beyond on Sunday, September 15, 2013 1:52 PM

Thank you Starrancher, I viewed this "Gem" last night in "AWESOME" seeing and by my second attempted it showed itself around 1030pm est. I viewed this star cloud for about an hour changing mags to get the most excellent view and it was such a treat. Thank  you

  • Member since
    May, 2012
Posted by Starrancher on Monday, September 30, 2013 2:52 PM

stepping beyond

Thank you Starrancher, I viewed this "Gem" last night in "AWESOME" seeing and by my second attempted it showed itself around 1030pm est. I viewed this star cloud for about an hour changing mags to get the most excellent view and it was such a treat. Thank  you

 

 

Excellent !  Good to hear you're having a good time with it . M31 has really got to be one of the greatest showpieces that deep space has to offer . There's so much to see in that view . My largest scope is an 8" but with its wide field capability , it's especially great on the large objects even with the humble 52 degree Plossls that I use . In that scope at 31x , it's my favorite view as there's just so much to see simultaniously in that large FOV . Both dust lanes and all . Once I ever get past the thrill of the low power view , I may just have to do some deeper looking into the more intimate parts of its structure with some higher mag views . I just have yet to get past the jaw dropping awesomeness of this low power view under the truly dark skies here . I can literally spend the whole night on this object as if I were watching a GRS transit on Jupiter . Another is M42 . I can be awed by that for hours and hours on end at about 50 to 60x magnification . If you're good and dark , NGC7293 (Helix) is another one thatll floor ya .

Have you checked out M33 yet ? If I recollect correctly without digging out my logs , it's best at about 60x for a full view with a little sky around it . On a best of night , I was able to pick out five spiral arms direct vision in my 8" . The first time I seen it , I just about fell over backwards . 

Having fun now . 

Dave 

The invisible man 

  • Member since
    April, 2012
  • From: North Carolina east coast USA
Posted by stepping beyond on Thursday, October 03, 2013 5:53 PM

Starrancher, Thanks so much. I'm so glad you have been able to view with a truly wide field. I get a really nice view in a 2" Zhumell plossdl 30mm,then I move up to the Z100's 16 and finally 9mm. I just received the 2" Z100 9mm about a month ago and it's my  upgrade from a 1 1/4" plossl. The wide field views are paramount but, I do like my examining Zoom oculars. There's just so much to see for us up lookers and it's like all these manufacturers want us to do is spend , spend , spend . I can't afford all this spending, I'm a poor man with my "PO MAN" equipment but, to me it's all about how I feel while viewing and what I can do with it . As for ngc 7293  I'll have to check my log, is that a Glob? M33 hasn't been viewed due to trees but, I thought that I had finally caught a view of it  I'll keep hunting. Maybe I'll get a view this winter , when the planet tilts. It should  clear the trees by then.I tried to go over to another AA house but, he really didn't want me to come over. I have trouble getting other AA to come over and enjoy the night sky or just SS about Astronomy. I say their loss, I set a date for a group outing in the backyard on the other groups I belong to and guess who contacted me "no one" I still had a great time even though the only ones there were my boys and I.

  • Member since
    March, 2008
Posted by Antitax on Thursday, October 03, 2013 7:06 PM

stepping beyond

it's like all these manufacturers want us to do is spend , spend , spend.

   Last week a friend told me he saw a telescope in a Trash Converters outlet. Funny because the day before I had set out to renovate old scopes, must be what they call synchronicity, or destiny in old-fashioned lingo. Here I am in the Trash Converters store, the scope is as I imagined: dirty, flimsy, skinny, but with potential. Worthless Huygenian eyepieces, very dark tunnel-vision and uncoated lenses. Plastic lens finder, but each leg in the alt-az tripod is made up of three very workable hollow aluminum tubes.

   Asking 20€ but one steel shaft in the altitude slow-mo is missing so they release it for 16€. Spent every evening since last Thursday reinforcing and accurizing all the mechanics. Sanded and painted the tube, filled the legs with dried/sanitized aquarium sand, adjusted, deburred, fitted, rectified everything. All that after a complete dismantling, down to the very last screw, nut and washer. Cleaned all the dirt it was sold with, must have contributed to the low price, so don't complain about it. The former owner and the Trash Converters staff wouldn't bother cleaning it; they should have known better because knowledge equals money, as was proven when I redeemed the scope with no more expenditure. 

   Thankfully the SBS 60mm/800mm objective was okay, but pinched in its cell, itself badly pinched in the dewshield, itself forcibly inserted over a large blob of paint at the tube's edge.

   Worst of the worst, a 25mm stop inside the tube should have been 38mm, so that an incredible 57% of the light was lost. Its former owner must have found it a dim scope. This is where knowledge makes for spending: since I started rebuilding it I spend nothing more on it, not even one cent. All parts and materials and tools I already had. The missing shaft proved useless cause the scope now has friction bearings, like a dobsonian, and works fine this way. I could already use it but I want to fine-tune and complete it a bit, with a new dewshield (already had the tube) and a solar filter (remaining piece of Astro Solar film after equipping the C5 and the 80mm apo has the right size, no spending).

   Its dotation 1.25" diagonal mirror has exactly the same quality as my Celestron/Vixen 1.25" prism, only a tiny, tiny bit less bright. The C5 now has a right-reading 6x30 finder, so its old 5x24 went to the 60mm's side. The material for the new baffles I already have, black paint, ditto, plywood for reinforced ashtray, ditto. Even lead sheets for balance, not one thing missing. If you're a do-it-yourselfer and you keep odds and ends you're your own telescope repair shop.

   Best of all, my dob was delivered with a 25mm Plössl I didn't use cause I already had a 24mm Hyperion. Luck or synchronicity to the extreme, the new scope already has its basic low-power/wide-field ocular. No more spending than the puny 16€ at Trash Converters and I'm equipped with a nearly-new scope. I'll take it to public viewing if ISON becomes bright enough this winter. It has no visible chromatic spread at 32x but I need to check up to 114x.

   I plan to give it a 36-euro, 70° GSO 15mm eyepiece and a 44-euro, 66° TS 9mm eyepiece, an f/13.3 scope is very forgiving of eyepiece quality. That will be the only extra spending besides the basic "investment" at Trash Converters. They really do convert thrash into cash!

 

TS 8x40 Wildlife, 10x50 Marine/Fujinon 16x70/TS 80mm triplet, 6x30 finder, EQ-3 mount, TS 2" 99% diagonal/Celestron C5+ and 6x30 finder, DIY tripod/5" Bahtinov/12" GSO dob, 8x50 finder/Meade 2" 24mm 82°/Hyperion 24,13,10mm 68°/TS Expanse 17mm 70°/SW 7mm Panorama 82°/Ultima 2x barlow/Astronomik UHC-E filter/Baader O-III/Astro Solar 5" & 80mm filters/Sky Atlas 2000/Rükl's Moon Atlas/Canon 400D/5mW green laser

  • Member since
    April, 2012
  • From: North Carolina east coast USA
Posted by stepping beyond on Friday, October 04, 2013 4:33 PM

 I've got to admit Antitax, that's good fortune for you. I'll just give you "KUDOS" on your good fortune.

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  • Member since
    July, 2001
  • From: PA, USA, Earth Moderator
Posted by DaveMitsky on Friday, October 04, 2013 5:54 PM

To answer your query from the other day, NGC 7293 (the Helix Nebula) is one of the closest and largest planetary nebulae.

http://messier.seds.org/xtra/ngc/n7293.html

http://stars.astro.illinois.edu/sow/n7293.html

It can be seen with binoculars from a good dark site.  

Dave Mitsky

Sic itur ad astra!

Chance favors the prepared mind.

A man is a small thing, and the night is very large and full of wonders.

  • Member since
    April, 2012
  • From: North Carolina east coast USA
Posted by stepping beyond on Friday, October 04, 2013 9:52 PM

Thank you Dave for those links, I'll definitely be on the "HUNT" for this nebulae

Tags: Helix

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