Your Favorite Deep Sky Object?

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  • Member since
    November, 2011
  • From: SE MA, U.S.A.
Your Favorite Deep Sky Object?
Posted by mr Q on Tuesday, February 25, 2014 10:57 AM

   For me, it was the Whirlpool Galaxy in CV since it is the only(?) view of two galaxies in colision visually.

   But now, after a 5 year stay in the high desert area of central New Mexico (6700 feet), I got to observe the Omega Centuri globular visually and in my 10" newt. The GC filled my LP FOV with a blanket of stars and words can't describe the view.

   Now back in the NE U.S., my present favorite is the above M51.

   So what is yours and why?

Mead DS-10 (10" newt)

10x50 Focal Bino

10x70 Orion Bino

What goes around, comes around, eventually.Wink

  • Member since
    October, 2005
Posted by leo731 on Tuesday, February 25, 2014 2:37 PM

Mine is still the old favorite M42, The Great Nebula of Orion.

I can see it with my naked eyes, binoculars, small telescope, big telescope, filters or no filters.  It rises high enough to escape the light pollution and ground fog.  It is easy to find and sits in a stunning area of the sky filled with all sorts of neat astronomical stuff.

L

A nebula in the eyepiece is worth two in the Atlas.

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  • Member since
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  • From: PA, USA, Earth Moderator
Posted by DaveMitsky on Wednesday, February 26, 2014 2:54 AM

Mr Q,

NGC 4038/NGC 4039 (the Antennae Galaxies), NGC 4490 and NGC 4485 (Arp 269), NGC 4676 (the Mice), NGC 6050 and IC 1179 (Arp 272) are some of the other interacting galaxies that are visible through amateur telescopes.

http://www.astronomersdoitinthedark.com/index.php?c=121&p=437

http://annesastronomynews.com/annes-image-of-the-day-interacting-galaxies-ngc-4490-4485/

http://hubblesite.org/newscenter/archive/releases/2002/11/image/d/

http://hubblesite.org/newscenter/archive/releases/2008/16/image/al/

Dave Mitsky

 

Sic itur ad astra!

Chance favors the prepared mind.

A man is a small thing, and the night is very large and full of wonders.

  • Member since
    March, 2008
Posted by Antitax on Wednesday, February 26, 2014 5:43 AM

DaveMitsky

NGC 4490 and NGC 4485 (Arp 269) [...] are some of the other interacting galaxies that are visible through amateur telescopes.

   Two friends and I saw them last Saturday, benefiting from unusually dry air over eastern Belgium. We had two sky meters confirming it was the blackest sky ever at the obsy since measurements began. SQM 20.55 and SQM 20.40 if I remember well. Not great but the best we can have at our semi-rural station.

   NGC 4490 was downright obvious in the 11-inch SCT, and NGC 4485 was quite easy, only smaller and less bright. This interacting pair is the easiest to find: it's only a half-degree northwest of the second brightest star in Canes Venatici.

   Inside my 62,000 people city close to a 200,000 people city, I could see 4490 with the 5-incher, but it looked only like a squarish ghost with two rounded sides. 4485 was invisible.

   To answer the first question: it's hard (maybe immoral Angel ) to have a favorite, and only one who has seen all the deep sky from both hemispheres could judge in full knowledge.

TS 8x40 Wildlife, 10x50 Marine/Fujinon 16x70/TS 80mm triplet, 6x30 finder, EQ-3 mount, TS 2" 99% diagonal/Celestron C5+ and 6x30 finder, DIY tripod/5" Bahtinov/12" GSO dob, 8x50 finder/Meade 2" 24mm 82°/Hyperion 24,13,10mm 68°/TS Expanse 17mm 70°/SW 7mm Panorama 82°/Ultima 2x barlow/Astronomik UHC-E filter/Baader O-III/Astro Solar 5" & 80mm filters/Sky Atlas 2000/Rükl's Moon Atlas/Canon 400D/5mW green laser

  • Member since
    July, 2003
  • From: Eastern SD.
Posted by johnjohnson on Friday, February 28, 2014 9:02 PM

One of my favorites is in the constellation Delphinus. NGC 7006. This object will push your optics to the maximum. Although it is only 135K light years away it is extremely hard to resolve individual stars. At magnitude 10.6 and a size of 3.6 X 3.6 arc minutes it requires very large aperture instruments to get other than a fuzzy blob. Collimation must be perfect in reflectors and atmospheric conditions just right to break out just a few individual stars in the globular.

Give your optics a run for their money on this object.

NGC 7006

Another object is in Abell 2199. It is NGC 6166. Located in the Hercules constellation, it is a galaxy at about 500 million light years away. It is surrounded by several other galaxies. Very dim but resolvable. It takes many minutes at the eye piece to begin to resolve the other galaxies in this cluster. Another good test of your instruments capabilities.

NGC 6166

 

JJ

20" F5 Obsession, OMI mirror .987 Strehl. 10" F4.7 reflector. 6" F5 ST reflector. 120mm F7.5 EON. 80mm F11.3 guide scope. SkyWatcher EQ-6 Hyper Tuned.   Flicker Astro Site   More Astro Images

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  • From: PA, USA, Earth Moderator
Posted by DaveMitsky on Saturday, March 01, 2014 3:18 PM

I hadn't seen NGC 4485 and the larger and brighter NGC 4490 (The Cocoon Galaxy) since early last year so I made it one of my targets on Wednesday night.  Using the ASH 17" f/15 classical Cassegrain at magnifications of 162 and 259x, both galaxies were visible from an orange zone site.

Consult http://cs.astronomy.com/asy/m/galaxies/489577.aspx?utm_source=SilverpopMailing&utm_medium=email&utm_campaign=ASY_News1_Sub_140228_Final&utm_content= (Reader Gallery photo links will no longer hot-link) for a recent image of NGC 4485 and NGC 4490.

Supernova 2008ax occurred in NGC 4490.

There's more on this interacting pair at http://observing.skyhound.com/archives/apr/NGC_4490.html and http://www.astrophotogallery.org/galaxies/p7346-ngc-4490-amp-ngc-4485.html

Dave Mitsky

Sic itur ad astra!

Chance favors the prepared mind.

A man is a small thing, and the night is very large and full of wonders.

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  • Member since
    July, 2001
  • From: PA, USA, Earth Moderator
Posted by DaveMitsky on Saturday, March 01, 2014 4:37 PM

One doesn't have to observe every object in the heavens to have a favorite or a favorite by type.  Since there is now an amateur astronomer who owns a 70-inch aperture, it is a physical impossibility for an observer to see every deep-sky object that is visible with such a telescope in the span of a human lifetime.

http://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/article-2487485/Utah-truckdriver-builds-worlds-largest-amateur-telescope.html

I have observed from both hemispheres.  If I had to pick a single DSO that is the most interesting to observe, it would be the Large Magellanic Cloud, which contains the gigantic Tarantula Nebula (also known as NGC 2070 or 30 Doradus) and numerous open clusters, stellar associations, and globular clusters.  I spent several hours logging objects within the LMC with a 22" Starmaster Dob.

http://messier.seds.org/xtra/ngc/n2070.html

http://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2010/06/100601114803.htm

http://www.universetoday.com/65655/menagerie-of-celestial-objects-in-new-image-of-the-large-magellanic-cloud/

IMO, NGC 5139 (Omega Centauri) is the most spectacular DSO visually, with NGC 104 (47 Tucanae), which has a unique inner core, coming in second.  Some observers put NGC 104 first.

http://www.aao.gov.au/images/captions/aat089a.html

http://www.aao.gov.au/images/captions/aat076a.html

NGC 3372 (the Eta Carinae Nebula) was the most impressive nebula that I've ever viewed.

http://apod.nasa.gov/apod/ap131015.html

http://www.aao.gov.au/images/captions/aat009.html

My favorite open cluster, NGC 3532 (the Wishing Well Cluster), also resides in the southern hemisphere sky.

http://www.pampaskies.com/gallery3/Deep-Space-Objects/NGC3532-891935937

http://messier.seds.org/xtra/ngc/n3532.html

Dave Mitsky

Sic itur ad astra!

Chance favors the prepared mind.

A man is a small thing, and the night is very large and full of wonders.

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