"Orion Hole" ?

5887 views
10 replies
1 rating 2 rating 3 rating 4 rating 5 rating
  • Member since
    May, 2005
"Orion Hole" ?
Posted by Anonymous on Monday, November 12, 2007 5:24 AM
Hello, everyone. I don't know much about astronomy, so sorry if this question is silly or in a wrong place.

I'm translating a movie script (from Finnish to English), and at one point the script mentions something called "Orion Hole". However, I can't seem to find much information of such a thing (the original finnish term returns 1 google search result with very old information). So, since you guys are into astronomy - does such a thing even exist or is it something completely made up? And if it exists, what is a proper term for it? The Finnish web page says that it's a "gap" or a "hole" in the Orion Nebulae, revealed by images taken with reflecting telescopes. It's large enough for our solar system to fit in, and seems to have some sort of significance to some forms of Christian religion. Does this ring any bells to anyone?
  • Member since
    October, 2007
Posted by Stargazer at Large on Tuesday, November 13, 2007 10:36 AM
Can you give us the context in which this is mentioned? i.e. is it in the dialog? Can you give us the lines in question?
  • Member since
    May, 2005
Posted by Anonymous on Saturday, November 17, 2007 9:21 AM
Unfortunately, no - there is really no astronomy-related context there. It's only in the action description - like "the view zooms in the stars and through the Orion hole" and stuff like that. Nothing that would really help in this matter.
  • Member since
    October, 2007
Posted by Stargazer at Large on Saturday, November 17, 2007 11:16 AM

Well that sounds like it refers to the dark lane which spearates the larger Orion Nebula (M42) from a smaller area called de Mairan's Nebula (M43). I think this is the area that has been referred to as "Orion's Gate".

There are some fringe Christian groups that give a religious significance to this region. Example: http://www.orionsgate.org/ 

 

  • Member since
    May, 2005
Posted by Anonymous on Monday, November 19, 2007 3:52 AM
Ah, so they call it a gate :) I thought the word "hole" sounded a bit odd. Thanks a lot for the help!
Moderator
  • Member since
    July, 2001
  • From: PA, USA, Earth Moderator
Posted by DaveMitsky on Monday, November 19, 2007 4:52 AM

The following nicknames are the ones that I'm familiar with regarding the Orion Nebula: 

"M42 itself is apparently a very turbulent cloud of gas and dust, full of interesting details, which Charles Robert O'Dell has compared to the rich topography of the Grand Canyon in his HST photo caption. The major features got names on their own by various observers: The dark nebula forming the lane separating M43 from the main nebula extends well into the latter, forming a feature generally nicknamed the "Fish's Mouth". The bright regions to both sides are called the "wings", while at the end of the Fish's Mouth there's a cluster of newly formed stars, called the "Trapezium cluster". The wing extension to the south on the east (lower left in our image) is called "The Sword", the bright nebulosity below the Trapezium "The Thrust" and the fainter western (right) extension "The Sail"." 

http://seds.lpl.arizona.edu/messier/m/m042.html

Dave Mitsky 

Sic itur ad astra!

Chance favors the prepared mind.

A man is a small thing, and the night is very large and full of wonders.

  • Member since
    October, 2007
Posted by Stargazer at Large on Monday, November 19, 2007 8:24 AM

The term "Orion's Gate" is used not by astronomers (as far as I know) but by certain non-scientific groups (see link above).

Etni was asking about a term she found in Finnish so perhaps it is more commonly known in Scandanavia. Or, the original screenwriter may have been aware of these fringe groups.

 

  • Member since
    May, 2005
Posted by Anonymous on Monday, November 19, 2007 9:44 AM

Thanks to you too for answering, DaveMitsky!

 I don't think the term "Orion's Gate" is more commonly known in scandinavia; I found only 1 google result for the Finnish term, which is the reason I had to start asking around how to translate it. But you're right, the screenwriter is familiar with the non-scientific astronomy of these christian groups, and I believe the place is mentioned in the script because of its spiritual meaning to those people.

Well, now I know what I should call it, no matter whether I'm talking to religious or scientific people ;)

  • Member since
    July, 2006
Posted by Never on Monday, November 19, 2007 10:11 AM
Never heard the term and it doesn't sound very astronomy-like.

/Jake
Jaakko Saloranta - http://www.kolumbus.fi/jaakko.saloranta/ 8" Orion DSE, 4.7" Sky-Watcher & 3" Konus RFT
  • Member since
    May, 2005
Posted by Anonymous on Tuesday, November 20, 2007 3:32 PM

 Never wrote:
Never heard the term and it doesn't sound very astronomy-like.

/Jake

 You're right :) It's explained in Stargazer's post (the fourth one in this thread)

  • Member since
    July, 2006
Posted by Never on Tuesday, November 20, 2007 5:08 PM
Feel free to pass the Finnish text to me if needed. Also make sure if any Finnish is spoken in the movie it is not German or just random words that mean nothing in Finnish like Hollywood usually makes it Smile [:)]

/Jake
Jaakko Saloranta - http://www.kolumbus.fi/jaakko.saloranta/ 8" Orion DSE, 4.7" Sky-Watcher & 3" Konus RFT

Join our Community!

Our community is FREE to join. To participate you must either login or register for an account.

ADVERTISEMENT

FREE EMAIL NEWSLETTER

Receive news, sky-event information, observing tips, and more from Astronomy's weekly email newsletter.

ADVERTISEMENT
ADVERTISEMENT
Find us on Facebook

Loading...