Comet ISON Has Brightened to a Negative Magnitude

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Comet ISON Has Brightened to a Negative Magnitude
Posted by DaveMitsky on Wednesday, November 27, 2013 4:03 PM

Sic itur ad astra!

Chance favors the prepared mind.

A man is a small thing, and the night is very large and full of wonders.

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Posted by DaveMitsky on Thursday, November 28, 2013 4:42 AM

A 27-hour-long time lapse video from the SOHO satellite that shows Comet ISON's approach towards perihelion can be seen at http://spaceweather.com/images2013/28nov13/sundiver_anim.gif?PHPSESSID=nnsfhscvu7boc9u092331imp65

Note how the horizontal blooming spikes lengthen as the comet gets brighter and brighter as it nears the Sun.

Dave Mitsky

Sic itur ad astra!

Chance favors the prepared mind.

A man is a small thing, and the night is very large and full of wonders.

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Posted by DaveMitsky on Thursday, November 28, 2013 5:27 AM

By the way, there is a deep-sky object visible in these SOHO images. Does anyone want to take a guess as to what it is?

Dave Mitsky

Sic itur ad astra!

Chance favors the prepared mind.

A man is a small thing, and the night is very large and full of wonders.

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Posted by Aratus on Thursday, November 28, 2013 10:09 AM

The Sun is in Scorpius at the moment, and I assume the bright star to the left is Antares.  The fuzzy to the right of Antares therefore will be the globular cluster, M4, normally a nice sight in our summer night skies.

I'm sorry to say that ISON is still performing under par, but anything can happen.  Within the next couple of hours, it will have swung around the Sun, and whatever is left of it will be heading into darker skies.  

Aratus

Location:  North West Devon, UK

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Posted by Bullfox on Thursday, November 28, 2013 10:26 AM

What are the other elongated objects that briefly flash through the image?

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Posted by Aratus on Thursday, November 28, 2013 3:08 PM

I'd guess that these are energised particles affecting the sensor - possibly cosmic rays.

I don't know for certain though.

It appears that ISON has fizzled and broken up.  As far as a bright comet is concerned, that appears to be the end of the 'comet of the century'.Sad

Aratus

Location:  North West Devon, UK

-------------------------------------------------

Celestron Nexstar8i (8" SCT).

Celestron Skymaster binoculars 15x70

Other:0.63 & 0.33 correctors. X2 & X4 barlow.

Imagers: Meade DSI & Celestron NexImage.  Canon EOS 550D

 

 

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Posted by Tony383 on Thursday, November 28, 2013 11:24 PM

?

"The problem with quotes on the internet is that it is hard to determine whether they are genuine"  Abraham Lincoln

Dobsonian, 72mm Astro-Tech ED refractor, a bunch of eyepieces, a couple of filters, a DSLR and german equatorial mount, binoculars

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Posted by Tony383 on Friday, November 29, 2013 12:55 PM

Is it just me, or does anyone else notice in the loop above posted by Dave M. notice that just after the coronal mass ejection directed toward ISON a couple days ago, it brightens considerably and then breaks apart?  I am by no means an expert at looking at these SOHO video clips, but that is what I am seeing.  Could it be that it actually broke apart due to the CME, then dimmed, and several chunks or at least one chunk has survived the passage?  

Here is an updated clip that might show it better:

http://science.nasa.gov/media/medialibrary/2013/11/29/weird_anim.gif

Note that the clip above is missing clips from around 0900 to 1200 UT which is unfortunate because that would appear to be the timeframe when ISON actually passed through the initial CME "blastwave".  Does anyone know how I could look up that particular timeframe on the SOHO clips?  

 

"The problem with quotes on the internet is that it is hard to determine whether they are genuine"  Abraham Lincoln

Dobsonian, 72mm Astro-Tech ED refractor, a bunch of eyepieces, a couple of filters, a DSLR and german equatorial mount, binoculars

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Posted by Tony383 on Friday, November 29, 2013 1:28 PM
Ok, I found a way to look it up on the SOHO website Archive. Very interesting....

"The problem with quotes on the internet is that it is hard to determine whether they are genuine"  Abraham Lincoln

Dobsonian, 72mm Astro-Tech ED refractor, a bunch of eyepieces, a couple of filters, a DSLR and german equatorial mount, binoculars

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Posted by DaveMitsky on Friday, November 29, 2013 1:38 PM

Based on what I've read, CMEs only affect the tails of inbound comets.

http://news.discovery.com/space/astronomy/will-sun-rip-off-comet-isons-tail-131125.htm

Dave Mitsky

Sic itur ad astra!

Chance favors the prepared mind.

A man is a small thing, and the night is very large and full of wonders.

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Posted by DaveMitsky on Friday, November 29, 2013 1:57 PM

In addition, there seems to be no causal relationship between the occurrence of CMEs and the advent of sungrazing comets.

http://sungrazer.nrl.navy.mil/index.php?p=news/comets_cmes

Dave Mitsky

Sic itur ad astra!

Chance favors the prepared mind.

A man is a small thing, and the night is very large and full of wonders.

  • Member since
    October, 2013
Posted by Tony383 on Friday, November 29, 2013 2:26 PM

Interesting articles Dave.  Thanks!

"The problem with quotes on the internet is that it is hard to determine whether they are genuine"  Abraham Lincoln

Dobsonian, 72mm Astro-Tech ED refractor, a bunch of eyepieces, a couple of filters, a DSLR and german equatorial mount, binoculars

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