November New Moon Spotting

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  • Member since
    October, 2005
Posted by leo731 on Friday, November 08, 2013 4:54 PM

The young waxing moon images I took earlier this week were awful.  Here is the best of the lot:

 
Not all that good but he first is moon-set and the second is the next day waxing crescent moon.
 
L

A nebula in the eyepiece is worth two in the Atlas.

  • Member since
    November, 2009
Posted by Poppa Chris on Thursday, November 07, 2013 2:53 PM

Interesting... I saw another HUGE long-lived fireball Tuesday morning around 5:30.  I stretd out around the border of Orion and Canis Major near Sirius  and travelled almost due north nearly to Ursa Major.

One of the brightest, slowest, long-lived meteors I've ever seen.  At one point it appeared to break into 2 pieces just before it snuffed out.  I almost felt I could hear a sonic boom, but I couldn't really say that the sound wasn't from the traffic on I-12 about 2 miles away from me.

A sweet treat for breakfast! 

---Poppa Chris---

Denham Springs, Louisiana USA

"Second star to the right - Then straight on until morning!" - Peter Pan

Celestron CPC1100GPS (XLT) - 279mm aperature, 2800mm Focal length. (f10) Celestron Ultima LX (70deg AFOV) Eyepieces 32mm thru 5mm, Canon EOS Rebel T2i DSLR, Backyard EOS imaging software, Orion Star Shoot Planetary Imager IV, Celestron Skymaster 15x70 binoculars

 

  • Member since
    October, 2005
Posted by leo731 on Thursday, November 07, 2013 2:15 PM

I did see the Moon and Venus last night as I left work and it made a mighty fine pair.  I wound up missing the very bright fireball last night by about 15 minutes though!  I also observed the Moon and Venus the night before (November 5).  The Moon was actually easy to see well above the horizon.  I took some pictures but thanks to a crazy work schedule I have been unable to process them.  I will post one when I can.

L

A nebula in the eyepiece is worth two in the Atlas.

Moderator
  • Member since
    July, 2001
  • From: PA, USA, Earth Moderator
Posted by DaveMitsky on Thursday, November 07, 2013 2:06 PM

Venus and the three-and-a-half-day-old crescent Moon certainly made for a picturesque pair in yesterday evening's western sky.  The Moon was illuminated 15% and Venus 46% and the two were a bit more than 6 degrees apart at the time.

Dave Mitsky

Sic itur ad astra!

Chance favors the prepared mind.

A man is a small thing, and the night is very large and full of wonders.

  • Member since
    May, 2005
Posted by Centaur on Thursday, October 31, 2013 2:32 PM

Thanks, Chris, for your fine description of your view of the Old Moon. It's great that you had such an interesting view. I hope it turns out just as well for you with the New Moon next week.

For astronomical graphics, including monthly wallpaper calendar, visit:

www.CurtRenz.com/astronomical


  • Member since
    November, 2009
Posted by Poppa Chris on Thursday, October 31, 2013 2:22 PM

I know I'm a day early for the true New Moon, but the view I had this morning of the thin waning crescent was pretty neat.  Approximately 5:45AM I made my usual morning stroll to get my newspaper, this time leaving my trusty 15x70 binos behind since the weather is cloudy and threatening rain with the approach of an early season (for us in Louisiana anyway) cold front. As expected there wasn't a star to be seen in the clouds. But I did notice a white glow in the east that was obviously not attributable to morning twilight.  The color was way too pale.  As I watched for a moment the light seemed to brighten and grow smaller in diameter.  when it brightened enough I could see the cloud cover was moving very swiftly across the sky in a SW to NE direction. Then a small gap appeared and although very hazy and diffuse there was the sliver of Moon that I know was the source of the white light.  I only wish I had the opportunity to snap a picture or better yet a short video of this scene as it was very ethereal.  But almost as swiftly as it appeared the cloud cover thickened again and it was gone.  A repeat would probably be out of the question as an orangish glow of the impending dawn was now starting to become more of Mother Nature's idea of light pollution.

Hope all of you do better tomorrow!

 

---Poppa Chris---

Denham Springs, Louisiana USA

"Second star to the right - Then straight on until morning!" - Peter Pan

Celestron CPC1100GPS (XLT) - 279mm aperature, 2800mm Focal length. (f10) Celestron Ultima LX (70deg AFOV) Eyepieces 32mm thru 5mm, Canon EOS Rebel T2i DSLR, Backyard EOS imaging software, Orion Star Shoot Planetary Imager IV, Celestron Skymaster 15x70 binoculars

 

  • Member since
    May, 2005
November New Moon Spotting
Posted by Centaur on Tuesday, October 29, 2013 11:13 PM
It’s nearly time for my monthly naked-eye New Moon spotting challenge, which starts to become easier for observers north of the tropics as we move further past the autumnal equinox. Sharp eyed North Americans should be able to sight the day-and-a-half-old Moon after sunset on November 4.
 
   My more detailed article describing the waxing crescent Moon’s first appearance of the coming lunar month appears under the links for my preview graphics at www.CurtRenz.com/moon
 
   Photos and descriptions of the young Moon would be welcome additions to this thread.  Please include your location, date and time with zone.
 
   Below is a photo of the waxing crescent Moon that I shot from Arlington Heights, Illinois on 2011 OCT 28 at 18:18 CDT while the Moon was aged 2.1 days.
 
 
http://www.curtrenz.com/NM111028.jpg

For astronomical graphics, including monthly wallpaper calendar, visit:

www.CurtRenz.com/astronomical


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