Hedge Your Bets on Comet ISON

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Hedge Your Bets on Comet ISON
Posted by DaveMitsky on Monday, March 25, 2013 2:09 PM

Comet ISON is not brightening as expected.  Just how "spectacular" this comet will be eventually is anybody's guess.

Dave Mitsky

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Posted by DaveMitsky on Monday, March 25, 2013 2:10 PM

Sic itur ad astra!

Chance favors the prepared mind.

A man is a small thing, and the night is very large and full of wonders.

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Posted by zerro1 on Monday, March 25, 2013 11:06 PM

Thanks Dave for the update... I was hoping for a good show from this one .

M44
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Posted by M44 on Tuesday, March 26, 2013 9:14 AM

I was hoping ISON would make up for the poor viewing conditions for PANSTARRS from the UK.

How can I be at one with the universe when we don't know what 96% of it actually is?

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Posted by Aratus on Tuesday, March 26, 2013 5:15 PM

I long ago disciplined myself not to get excited about any comet forecast.  Que sera sera !  Geeked

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Posted by DaveMitsky on Wednesday, March 27, 2013 12:47 PM

Sic itur ad astra!

Chance favors the prepared mind.

A man is a small thing, and the night is very large and full of wonders.

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Posted by DaveMitsky on Friday, June 28, 2013 3:37 PM

Browse www.space.com/21758-comet-ison-summer-brightness.html for a new article on Comet ISON.  The comet will be free from the glare of the Sun and will be visible again through larger telescopes on August 8th.

Dave Mitsky

Sic itur ad astra!

Chance favors the prepared mind.

A man is a small thing, and the night is very large and full of wonders.

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Posted by DaveMitsky on Thursday, July 04, 2013 1:51 AM

There's an article on Comet ISON by comet expert John Bortle posted at www.skyandtelescope.com/.../Comet-ISON-Approaches-211408441.html

Dave Mitsky

Sic itur ad astra!

Chance favors the prepared mind.

A man is a small thing, and the night is very large and full of wonders.

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Posted by DaveMitsky on Thursday, July 04, 2013 2:01 AM

Here's the NASA video on the comet.

Dave Mitsky

Sic itur ad astra!

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A man is a small thing, and the night is very large and full of wonders.

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Posted by DaveMitsky on Tuesday, July 23, 2013 9:52 PM

Recent findings regarding Comet ISON can be found at www.universetoday.com/.../comet-ison-is-spewing-out-carbon-dioxide-and-dust

Dave Mitsky

Sic itur ad astra!

Chance favors the prepared mind.

A man is a small thing, and the night is very large and full of wonders.

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Posted by DaveMitsky on Saturday, August 10, 2013 11:26 AM

There's an interview with one of the co-discovers of the comet at cs.astronomy.com/.../an-interview-with-comet-ison-39-s-co-discoverer.aspx

Dave Mitsky

Sic itur ad astra!

Chance favors the prepared mind.

A man is a small thing, and the night is very large and full of wonders.

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Posted by DaveMitsky on Monday, August 12, 2013 12:29 PM

This recent article on Comet ISON poses a very pertinent question:

news.discovery.com/.../will-comet-ison-be-another-comet-kohoutek-130808.htm

Dave Mitsky

Sic itur ad astra!

Chance favors the prepared mind.

A man is a small thing, and the night is very large and full of wonders.

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Posted by DaveMitsky on Tuesday, August 13, 2013 2:01 PM

Comet ISON has been recovered and things are not looking very promising.

http://www.skyandtelescope.com/news/Comet-ISON-Recovered-and-Not-Looking-Good-219432571.html

Dave Mitsky

Sic itur ad astra!

Chance favors the prepared mind.

A man is a small thing, and the night is very large and full of wonders.

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Posted by DaveMitsky on Saturday, August 31, 2013 9:07 PM

There's more discouraging news on the comet at www.skyandtelescope.com/.../Comet-ISON-Updates-193909261.html

Dave Mitsky

Sic itur ad astra!

Chance favors the prepared mind.

A man is a small thing, and the night is very large and full of wonders.

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Posted by Silveradogold on Tuesday, September 03, 2013 8:40 PM

Thank you Dave,

Thank you for keeping us informed.

Clear Skies.....Silveradogold Cool

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Posted by duzzy on Wednesday, September 04, 2013 12:04 PM

Is it possible that a Comet of this size as it begins to heat up will glow in spots that make it look like more than 1 object? I have seen images from YouTube that might suggest this is possible.

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Posted by DaveMitsky on Thursday, September 05, 2013 1:38 AM

Current observations of the comet put it at approximately magnitude 13.

www.universetoday.com/.../ready-set-observe-how-to-see-comet-ison-in-the-early-morning-sky

Dave Mitsky

Sic itur ad astra!

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A man is a small thing, and the night is very large and full of wonders.

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Posted by DaveMitsky on Thursday, September 05, 2013 11:50 AM

duzzy

Is it possible that a Comet of this size as it begins to heat up will glow in spots that make it look like more than 1 object? I have seen images from YouTube that might suggest this is possible.

Cometary nuclei are far too small to be resolved telescopically.  Were the images you mentioned of comets that had fragmented?

Dave Mitsky

Sic itur ad astra!

Chance favors the prepared mind.

A man is a small thing, and the night is very large and full of wonders.

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Posted by Sparky77 on Thursday, September 05, 2013 11:51 AM

We certainly need to study comets that come by us much more closely to see if the theories presented in this documentary are more accurate than the old dirty snowball theory.  I personally agree with the new concepts because how can the tails be the result of solar heating when the comets develop very long twisted tails while still so far from the sun and then still survive a close pass to the sun?

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Posted by DaveMitsky on Thursday, September 05, 2013 12:12 PM

Sic itur ad astra!

Chance favors the prepared mind.

A man is a small thing, and the night is very large and full of wonders.

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Posted by Aratus on Thursday, September 05, 2013 1:00 PM

Magnitude 13 is a slight improvement in absolute brightness over a week ago.   At that rate it will be the same brightness as asteroid 1Ceres by the 8th November. (7.9)

Aratus

Location:  North West Devon, UK

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Posted by chipdatajeffB on Thursday, September 05, 2013 3:26 PM

The comets we have observed  via spacecraft, as well as the bits collected by the StarDust mission, agree very well with the "old dirty snowball theory" ... except that they're a bit dirtier than previously thought.

The "solar wind" is quite energetic even at very great distances from the Sun (around the orbital distances of the gas giants). Even so, none of the comets I have observed while at such distances from the Sun do not have "very long twisted tails" at that range.

I haven't viewed more than about 100 or so via SOHO "movies", during their perigee passes. Only a very few of them tend to lose their tails at perigee (probably because perigee distances are still quite large (not counting the so-called "sun divers", of course.

While I'm not an expert on comets, per se, I do study meteoritics. The difference between comets, asteroid, and meteoroids seems now not to be so large as was thought only a few decades ago. I am not aware of any mechanism by which electromagnetic or electrostatic fields can arise and persist in these bodies, except by their passage through the solar wind and solar or planetary magnetic fields. There is enough nickel-iron in these bodies to support some level of induction during such passage, but I'm not aware of such fields being indigenous to the bodies, themselves. Of course, the problem with studying such fields in meteorites is that meteorites (being On the Earth) are within a considerable magnetic field while being studied.

In induced electromagnetic field that is carried along with such a body in orbit around the Sun should have an effect on particles streaming from it (as those ejected in the form of a tail), but I know of no study that shows such fields being strong enough to create cometary tails.

Sublimation, however, can be quite dramatic even at very low differentials of heat and pressure -- especially when you consider that comets travel at cosmic velocities when approaching or receding from the Sun.

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Posted by Sparky77 on Thursday, September 05, 2013 4:10 PM

The solar wind does not contribute to any significant increases in any temperatures, its composed of more energetic particles more closely related to lightning, also, don't forget that silicon compounds also conduct electricity, they're semiconductors, just think about whats in the computer your using to read this, plus several other frozen gases trapped in the porous materials also conduct electricity when either frozen or in gaseous form.  I'm not saying all the activity we observe from comets is because of the magnetic/electric effects of the sun, but it does contribute to it, its not all from solar heating.  Of course most of the proponents for the "dirty snowball" won't want to agree with the electric universe theories, neither of which are correct in their entirety.

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Posted by chipdatajeffB on Thursday, September 05, 2013 4:14 PM

Let's not hijack this thread with more on the electric universe. Take that to another thread if you like.

The universe is not only stranger than we imagine, it's stranger than we CAN imagine. --- JBS Haldane

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Posted by DaveMitsky on Saturday, September 07, 2013 1:45 PM

Yesterday's episode of Stardate dealt with Comet ISON.  Notice the use of the words may and could.

http://stardate.org/radio/program/getting-closer

Dave Mitsky

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A man is a small thing, and the night is very large and full of wonders.

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Posted by Starrancher on Friday, September 13, 2013 2:51 PM

We'll just have to wait and see .

I ain't placin' any bets .

The invisible man 

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Posted by DaveMitsky on Wednesday, September 18, 2013 1:36 PM

There's a video update on the Comet ISON  by S & T Senior Editor Alan MacRobert posted at www.youtube.com/watch

Recent articles on the comet can be found at www.skynews.ca/new-comet-may-become-brilliant-in-2013 and http://hubblesite.org/hubble_discoveries/comet_ison

Interested parties can follow Comet ISON's progress at theskylive.com/ison-tracker

Dave Mitsky

Sic itur ad astra!

Chance favors the prepared mind.

A man is a small thing, and the night is very large and full of wonders.

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Posted by DaveMitsky on Monday, September 23, 2013 3:06 PM

Sic itur ad astra!

Chance favors the prepared mind.

A man is a small thing, and the night is very large and full of wonders.

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Posted by DaveMitsky on Tuesday, September 24, 2013 2:37 PM

A very nice image of the comet taken this morning by Damian Peach can be seen at http://www.damianpeach.com/deepsky/c2012_s1_2013_09_24rgb.jpg

Dave Mitsky

Sic itur ad astra!

Chance favors the prepared mind.

A man is a small thing, and the night is very large and full of wonders.

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Posted by DaveMitsky on Tuesday, September 24, 2013 3:24 PM

Here's an informative update on the comet from EarthSky:

http://earthsky.org/space/big-sun-diving-comet-ison-might-be-spectacular-in-2013

Dave Mitsky

Sic itur ad astra!

Chance favors the prepared mind.

A man is a small thing, and the night is very large and full of wonders.

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