Check M82 as soon as possible

719 views
5 replies
1 rating 2 rating 3 rating 4 rating 5 rating
  • Member since
    March, 2008
Check M82 as soon as possible
Posted by Antitax on Wednesday, January 22, 2014 2:58 PM

   A supernova has been spotted there; it's mag 11.7 now but could reach mag 8 within hours. Any scope or large bino will show it if this happens.

Tags: quick

TS 8x40 Wildlife, 10x50 Marine/Fujinon 16x70/TS 80mm triplet, 6x30 finder, EQ-3 mount, TS 2" 99% diagonal/Celestron C5+ and 6x30 finder, DIY tripod/5" Bahtinov/12" GSO dob, 8x50 finder/Meade 2" 24mm 82°/Hyperion 24,13,10mm 68°/TS Expanse 17mm 70°/SW 7mm Panorama 82°/Ultima 2x barlow/Astronomik UHC-E filter/Baader O-III/Astro Solar 5" & 80mm filters/Sky Atlas 2000/Rükl's Moon Atlas/Canon 400D/5mW green laser

  • Member since
    May, 2007
Posted by Bullfox on Wednesday, January 22, 2014 5:36 PM

Can stars in M82 be resolved enough to find the progenitor system?

Moderator
  • Member since
    July, 2001
  • From: PA, USA, Earth Moderator
Posted by DaveMitsky on Wednesday, January 22, 2014 9:09 PM

Sic itur ad astra!

Chance favors the prepared mind.

A man is a small thing, and the night is very large and full of wonders.

  • Member since
    December, 2006
Posted by Graviton on Thursday, January 23, 2014 9:37 PM

In that Universe Today article, it mentions that the SN blew up over a week ago!  Where was Swift's BAT?  Was this a gamma ray-less supernova?  Would not that be important in some way?  I need answers!

Tags: BAT , Swift
Moderator
  • Member since
    July, 2001
  • From: PA, USA, Earth Moderator
Posted by DaveMitsky on Thursday, January 30, 2014 3:59 PM

A UV image from Swift is posted at http://www.sci-news.com/astronomy/science-sn-2014j-swift-supernova-01726.html

Observations are most likely underway at the moment by the HST, the Chandra X-ray Observatory, the Nuclear Spectroscopic Telescope Array (NuSTAR), and the Fermi Gamma-ray Space Telescope.

http://www.nasa.gov/content/goddard/nasa-spacecraft-take-aim-at-nearby-supernova/#.UurJq_ldWSo

Dave Mitsky

Sic itur ad astra!

Chance favors the prepared mind.

A man is a small thing, and the night is very large and full of wonders.

  • Member since
    March, 2008
Posted by Antitax on Thursday, February 06, 2014 2:54 PM

   Saw it on two nights with the Celestron 5 and the GSO 12" from within my city. It's not brightening to the 8th magnitude as hoped but it's still easy, and two brighter field stars point to it, close to the galaxy's core. Conditions were unsual dry air but the usual orange tint to the sky, plus some moonlight. 

   Anyone with the equipment and the time should give it a go, supernovae that bright are rare, and it's going to fade in the next weeks.

TS 8x40 Wildlife, 10x50 Marine/Fujinon 16x70/TS 80mm triplet, 6x30 finder, EQ-3 mount, TS 2" 99% diagonal/Celestron C5+ and 6x30 finder, DIY tripod/5" Bahtinov/12" GSO dob, 8x50 finder/Meade 2" 24mm 82°/Hyperion 24,13,10mm 68°/TS Expanse 17mm 70°/SW 7mm Panorama 82°/Ultima 2x barlow/Astronomik UHC-E filter/Baader O-III/Astro Solar 5" & 80mm filters/Sky Atlas 2000/Rükl's Moon Atlas/Canon 400D/5mW green laser

Join our Community!

Our community is FREE to join. To participate you must either login or register for an account.

ADVERTISEMENT

FREE EMAIL NEWSLETTER

Receive news, sky-event information, observing tips, and more from Astronomy's weekly email newsletter.

ADVERTISEMENT
ADVERTISEMENT
Find us on Facebook

Loading...