Bright Point of Light After sunset

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  • Member since
    June, 2010
Bright Point of Light After sunset
Posted by cncr04s on Thursday, June 10, 2010 1:51 PM

 For the Past week or so, there is this very bright point of light that appears after sunset for about 2 or 3 hours a few degrees above the horizon a bit south of the area the sun has set in (west). This is odd because I live in a big metro area(Chicago/Milwaukee) and can't see any other stars. The point is as bright as the moon, and it flickers like a star does. I have no idea what it is, has any body any clue?

  • Member since
    February, 2007
Posted by chuck81 on Thursday, June 10, 2010 1:53 PM

Venus.

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  • Member since
    January, 2004
Posted by tkerr on Thursday, June 10, 2010 2:16 PM

Most definitely Venus.   One of the brightest objects in the sky.   Certain times of year, or during its orbit around the Sun it will be easily spoted as the Evening Star and can even be seen in daylight, while other times it will come around and be easily visible as the Morning Star.

 

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  • Member since
    March, 2010
Posted by pagandeva2000 on Thursday, June 10, 2010 5:13 PM

Yes, it is the glorious Venus!  I haven't seen her lately myself.  I think that the trees on my street are blocking her (shame on those trees...).  I look forward to seeing Venus every night, and now, she's hiding from me...LOL!

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  • Member since
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Posted by Aratus on Thursday, June 10, 2010 5:22 PM

This isn't one of the best apparitions of Venus as it will tend to roll along the horizon rather than get higher in the sky.   As it increases its elongation it will tend to move back towards the west from the north west which may mean it will get back into a bit of the sky that is clearer for you.

 Look out for a Saturn-Mars-Venus conjunction around the 8th August.    Venus will sink rapidly out of sight after that.

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  • Member since
    March, 2010
Posted by pagandeva2000 on Thursday, June 10, 2010 7:41 PM

Aratus

This isn't one of the best apparitions of Venus as it will tend to roll along the horizon rather than get higher in the sky.   As it increases its elongation it will tend to move back towards the west from the north west which may mean it will get back into a bit of the sky that is clearer for you.

 Look out for a Saturn-Mars-Venus conjunction around the 8th August.    Venus will sink rapidly out of sight after that.

I thought that conjunction was coming this month...it's August 8?  Or is there something else that is happening this month? 

The other night when I saw Jupiter at 4am (first time seeing it at that time of the morning), it sort of reminded me of Venus...but for some reason, it looked eerie...I was so fascinated.  I remember reading in a trivia book that many people have mistaken Venus and Jupiter as flying saucers.  While I don't believe in them per se, I had to say after viewing it in the dead of night that I can understand how that would happen to someone who didn't know any better.

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  • Member since
    May, 2005
Posted by Centaur on Friday, June 11, 2010 2:33 AM

Welcome to the discussion group, cncr04s.

 

Yes indeed that is Venus, far and away the brightest celestial object other than the Sun and Moon.  The flickering occurs when it is close to the horizon and its light must travel through much atmosphere and dust before reaching your eyes.  Venus causes people to wonder every 1.6 years as it pops up again as the brilliant Evening Star in the western sky.  During the other half of that period it is the equally bright Morning Star in the east before dawn.  If you go to my astronomical webpage at http://www.curtrenz.com/astronomical you will see a link to an animated graphic I made to demonstrate Venus as it will appear to dance with other planets and bright stars later this summer.  Then click over to my page for the Inferior Planets (those closer to the Sun than us) and you will see several more of my graphics related to Venus and its apparition cycles. 

 

For astronomical graphics, including monthly wallpaper calendar, visit:

www.CurtRenz.com/astronomical


  • Member since
    December, 2009
Posted by NewGazer911 on Sunday, June 13, 2010 9:47 PM

Its Venus..The planet most like hell...lol

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