Finding a Star's Coordinates

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Finding a Star's Coordinates
Posted by Anonymous on Tuesday, May 23, 2006 7:18 PM
I know next to nothing about astronomy.

I have been provided the following star's ID: 3123-1399.  I was told that by searching GSC 1 Catalogue I could find this star's coordinates.  Apparently this star is in the Lyra constellation.

I have been searching for an online GSC catalogue to no avail. 

Can someone help me with this task?
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Posted by Bert on Tuesday, May 23, 2006 8:00 PM
Bert O'Dell LX200 10" Classic If you have a 14" scope you don't want I'll pay shipping :P Charleston WV
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Posted by Anonymous on Tuesday, May 23, 2006 8:18 PM
I've been there before.  Where do I enter 3123-1399?  I must be missing something. 

3123-1399 is the ID, I think.  An error is returned when I put it in as object name.
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Posted by Centaur on Tuesday, May 23, 2006 8:23 PM

Welcome to the discussion group, jsmith.

You are referring to the Guide Star Catalog for the Hubble Space Telescope.  I tried SIMBAD for GSC 3123-1399 and it was not recognized.

http://simbad.u-strasbg.fr/sim-fid.pl

What is the interest in this star?  I hope it is not one of those identified by some huckster who takes money from unsuspecting people to place a chosen name for a star in a vanity book that he self-publishes.  Only the International Astronomical Union officially names stars.

For astronomical graphics, including monthly wallpaper calendar, visit:

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Posted by Anonymous on Tuesday, May 23, 2006 8:29 PM
No, not that. :)  It is puzzle I am working on.  Supposedly there is an online guide that will provide the celestrial coordinates for this "obscure faint star".  I searched for everything I could before I turned to the experts!
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Posted by Anonymous on Tuesday, May 23, 2006 8:32 PM
I did find:
http://galex.stsci.edu/gsc1/GSC1webform.aspx

When I put 3123 in the region and 1399 in the sequential, I received something, but I don't think it was coordinates.  If it was, I don't know how to read it.
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Posted by Centaur on Tuesday, May 23, 2006 9:19 PM

The star is at J2000.0 coordinates:  RA 284.92475° (18hr 59min 42sec) and Dec +39.436111° (+39° 26' 10")

Its magnitude is 11.8.

Now you at least owe me a more thorough explanation of the nature of your puzzle.

Note:  edited a typo in the RA

For astronomical graphics, including monthly wallpaper calendar, visit:

www.CurtRenz.com/astronomical


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Posted by tdvance on Thursday, May 25, 2006 3:13 AM
 Jsmith wrote:
I know next to nothing about astronomy.

I have been provided the following star's ID: 3123-1399.  I was told that by searching GSC 1 Catalogue I could find this star's coordinates.  Apparently this star is in the Lyra constellation.

I have been searching for an online GSC catalogue to no avail. 

Can someone help me with this task?


From Starry Night:

TYC 3123-1399-1

Name:    TYC3123-1399-1
Catalogue number:    TYC3123-1399-1
Object type:    Star
HIP number:    <none>
TYC number:    TYC3123-1399-1
Constellation name:    Lyra
Constellation common name:    The Lyre
Constellation possessive form:    Lyrae
RA (JNow):    18h 59m 54.6s
Dec (JNow):    39° 26' 35"
RA (J2000):    18h 59m 41.9s
Dec (J2000):    39° 26' 10"
Ecliptic longitude:    19h 39m 14.7s
Ecliptic latitude:    61° 36' 00"
Galactic longitude:    4h 39m 02.8s
Galactic latitude:    15° 21' 35"
Distance from observer:    <unknown>
Proper motion RA:    -0.0172 arcsec/ year
Proper motion Dec:    0.0212 arcsec/ year
Variability:    none
Radius:    <unknown>
Double/multiple:    single
Apparent magnitude:    12.09
Absolute magnitude:    <unknown>
Spectral Class:    <unknown>
Temperature:    3715 Kelvin
B-V colour:    1.40
Luminosity:    <unknown>
Heliocentric X:    <unknown>
Y:    <unknown>
Z:    <unknown>

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Posted by Anonymous on Friday, May 26, 2006 1:01 PM
hi gazers, i also am looking for the specifics for this star. I am looking for the coordinates of a Geo-cache hidden near Millville NJ. The coords start with North 39. ??.???

Your site looks great, i know what i'll be doing this week-end!

if anyone is interested in this cache, i'll forward the GC#.

Thanks Centauv and tdvance, maybe i'll see you around.
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Posted by Centaur on Friday, May 26, 2006 2:15 PM

 cheryl wrote:
hi gazers, i also am looking for the specifics for this star. I am looking for the coordinates of a Geo-cache hidden near Millville NJ. The coords start with North 39. ??.???

Welcome to the discussion group, Cheryl.

OK, now I think I understand your puzzle.  It seems you want to know the geographical coordinates of a location in New Jersey that correspond to the celestial coordinates of the star first mentioned in this thread.  The information you need actually appears in the previous posts, but may require some translation for you. Your cache should be located at:

W 75.07525° (W 75° 04' 30.9")

N 39.436111° (N 39° 26' 10.0")

This assumes J2000.0 celestial coordinates.  If so, the spot is in the Union Lake Wildlife Management Area near Millville, NJ.  Specifically, it is 260 meters west of the lake and 60 meters south of its northernmost point.

What's my share of the loot?

 

For astronomical graphics, including monthly wallpaper calendar, visit:

www.CurtRenz.com/astronomical


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Posted by Anonymous on Friday, May 26, 2006 8:47 PM

WOW!  You a rocket scientist?  Looks like i came to the right place for help. 

You definitely solved the puzzle!  Now if i leave before day break with my GPSr and flashlight, i might be First To Find (FTF).  Unless someone's out there tonight! 

as for your "share of the loot", the cache usually contain "Where's George Dollars"  coins, collectors buttons, toys for the kiddies, dollar store trinkets...sometimes a FTF prize as much as $20.00.  But it's really all about where it takes you to, and the hunt!  If you want to see who is FTF go to geocaching.com and to the edit box "find by waypoint" enter GCW6OG. 

 Just got a phone call. other geocachers found this site and are on there way out there! 

Thanks again... gotta go 

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Posted by Anonymous on Friday, May 26, 2006 8:49 PM
 cheryl wrote:
.... 

 Just got a phone call. other geocachers found this site and are on there way out there! 

Thanks again... gotta go 

 

I am curious, what is this geocaching you are talking about? Does it have anything to do with astronomy?

Thanks!

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Posted by Centaur on Friday, May 26, 2006 9:05 PM

 GuentherGal wrote:
I am curious, what is this geocaching you are talking about?

Welcome to the discussion group, GuentherGal.

Apparently Cheryl has run out seeking the cache.  I was unaware of geocaching until I put the word in a browser and found the website after reading Cheryl's first post.  I see that she mentions the website in her second post.  It is http://www.geocaching.com/

It seems to be a series of contests to find caches hidden at specific GPS (Global Positioning System) locations.  It does not seem to be related to astronomy except in the case of the clue for the New Jersey location.

For astronomical graphics, including monthly wallpaper calendar, visit:

www.CurtRenz.com/astronomical


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Posted by Anonymous on Saturday, May 27, 2006 11:16 AM

Thank you for your help, I was FTF! 

GuentherGal is one of the Geo-Cachers that found this site and was trying to be clever!  I actually took her with me to find the cache.

I am amazed at all this i am learning and find it fascinating.  When we go out night caching, several people know a bit of astronomy and it can help.  Hope to learn a lot more here!

 

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Posted by SN1987A on Saturday, May 27, 2006 11:38 AM
 cheryl wrote:
I am amazed at all this i am learning and find it fascinating.  When we go out night caching, several people know a bit of astronomy and it can help.  Hope to learn a lot more here!

I just love when that happens to someone. He/She comes here to get some info related to astronomy, although the purpose may be unrelated, and ends up getting an interest. Hope you continue to learn more about this fascinating subject. Smile [:)]

Clear Skies, Navneeth
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Posted by Anonymous on Sunday, December 23, 2007 5:15 AM

 Hi all -

 This is a bit of a strange request, perhaps; I thought it might fit into this thread rather than creating a new one.... Let's see, where to begin...

 I am looking to identify a star for a kind of art-project/"gift" for a friend; while I know all of the "naming" services are total frauds, I thought it would be fun to name a star with some astrological significance as a personal gift for a friend, something we can share between the two of us (that obviously would be recognized by no one but us, LOL).

 I'd like to find information on a star (celestial coordinates, etc.) with some regard to my friend's astrological natal chart- preferably a star that hasn't already been officially named by the IAU, and one that would be visible with a telescope (the other part of the gift is that I'm buying them a goto telescope so we can look at the star, go stargazing, and learn about astronomy in general).

 The only things I really know that I'd like to adhere to are that I'd like a star in the Saggitarius constellation, and if I can find something with coordinates containing the numbers 222 and/or 444 that would be a bonus. I'm not sure how the western astrological zodiac really correlates with actual astronomical positions- but if there is any correlation, my friend's natal chart indicates a rising sign at "3 degrees saggitarius"; again having no idea if this "degree" designation has any basis in  astronomical reality (I don't know if that position is based on the earth or some other point of the solar system- I think that is based on the earth's relative position so perhaps it's irrelevant to what I'm trying to find?).

Would anyone be kind enough to help me find a star and information on it? :)

 Many thanks in advance for any help or advice!

 Cheers


 

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Posted by chipdatajeffB on Sunday, December 23, 2007 10:00 AM

A friend who is seriously into astrology tells me that what you need to know is the exact year, month, day, hour, and minute (and preferably second, as well) of the person's birth. That is more important than knowing some "sign" attributes.

I am not sure, nor is she, about the "3 degrees Sagittarius" designation, other than it may be a spot in Sagittarius located 3 degrees from the ecliptic in the region of Sagittarius. If you can share more about that, it might help.

While there is no astronomical significance other than geometry, it may be astrologically significant that a given star "culminates" in Sagittarius at the appointed day and time. Depending on the date, this might even occur in daylight hours. And, if it's not astrologically significant, it might be significant enough for your purposes. A star "culminates" when it crosses the meridian at a given location, on a given date. The meridian is the arc that passes through celestial north and south and through the zenith at a given location. So, in order to determine a candidate star we'd need to know the date, time, and location of birth as nearly as possible. And then, of course, we'd have to hope there is an appropriately visible star somewhere in Sagittarius that is along the meridian at that time.

If we approach it given the numbers you cite, we could select something in the vicinity of -22.2 degrees declination, as Sagittarius is below the celestial equator. In addition, there are a couple of NGC (catalog) objects with "44" in their designations (NGC 6644, 6544, and 6445), but these are globular star clusters with many thousands of stars in each. Neither is near -22.2 degrees (both are between -24 and -25 degrees). In case you're not familiar with degrees of measure in the night sky, a degree is about twice the size of the Full Moon.

The right ascension hours in Sagittarius range from about 17 to 20, so you could choose an RA desgination and match that to -22.2 degrees. An RA of 17 hours, 44 minutes, and 4 seconds would be just within the western border of Sagittarius and there are a few naked-eye visible stars in that area.

It may interest you to know that this location is almost exactly 6 degrees north of the center of the Milky Way galaxy.

It may also be of interest that the Trifid Nebula (M20) is about 3 degrees east of the western border of Sagittarius, between -20 and -30 degrees declination.

But it's all guesswork until we know more specifics ... which is probably why many folks would rather shell out $50 and just go "buy a star". I think it's commendable you've chosen a different route!

Another way you can find an appropriate star is to use the online all-sky Star Atlas here to search that region for something you can use.

Almost all these stars will have a catalog listing, but very few have actual "names." Almost all star names are inherited from ancient catalogs and descriptions from the first true astronomers of what is now called the Middle East and Mediterranean regions.

The universe is not only stranger than we imagine, it's stranger than we CAN imagine. --- JBS Haldane

Come visit me at Comanche Springs Astronomy Campus (we're on Google Maps) in Texas.

www.3rf.org

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Posted by Anonymous on Sunday, December 23, 2007 10:16 AM

Wow, what a thorough response, thank you so much! Very helpful! :)

 I pulled the info I had from the natal chart I compiled online- I unfortunately don't have all of the specific birth details because my friend was adopted- all that we know is that she was born on September 24, 1951, in Boston MA. I don't have a birth time so I used 12:00 noon.

The right ascension hours in Sagittarius range from about 17 to 20, so you could choose an RA desgination and match that to -22.2 degrees. An RA of 17 hours, 44 minutes, and 4 seconds would be just within the western border of Sagittarius and there are a few naked-eye visible stars in that area.

 That sounds perfect if there's anything visible vicinity!
 

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Posted by chipdatajeffB on Sunday, December 23, 2007 11:06 AM

 

NP, happy to help!

The following image is from The Sky 6 (Pro) and is set looking due South at 10:22 p.m. (22:22):

Your star is indicated in the center of the two concentric circles to the left of the Object Information box in the image.

Click here to see or download a larger version of the image.

Note the popup box gives the SAO and Hipparchos catalog numbers for the star, as well as it's transit time (5:14 p.m. Boston time, so it would have been on the meridian a couple hours before sunset).

Note that the Equatorial 2000 coordinates are highlighted, showing it's at RA 17hrs 44 mins, which is barely inside the dashed line indicating the western border of Sagittarius.

The horizon as seen from Boston would be very near the lower edge of this image.

You could start with this star's coordinates in your GoTo system and then observe stars near this one through the telescope, watching the GoTo coordinates change until you get to exactly 17:44:44 or some other designation more to your liking.

This star is dimmer than can be seen from Boston, due to light pollution, but you could go west of Boston to a place near The Berkshires where it's much darker and clearer and probably see it. Binoculars would show it.

An advantage of viewing from a light-polluted area is that the stray light will mask the background Milky Way stars. The disadvantage is that stars dimmer than about magnitude 4 may not be viewable naked-eye at all, and this star is between mag 6 and 7 (much dimmer).

Here's how you find the center of our galaxy:

  • Locate M6 on the image.
  • Just above and to the left of M6 is a very dark dust cloud (splits the background star "haze" of the Milky Way.
  • This dark spot is just to the right of the "spout" of the Sagittarius Teapot in this image.
  • Notice there is a fine, dashed line dropping down vertically from "your star" into this dark spot.
  • The Galactic Center is just above and to the left of where that dashed line ends and turns left toward the "spout".

The universe is not only stranger than we imagine, it's stranger than we CAN imagine. --- JBS Haldane

Come visit me at Comanche Springs Astronomy Campus (we're on Google Maps) in Texas.

www.3rf.org

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Posted by Centaur on Monday, December 24, 2007 1:13 AM

CoutureNoir

 Hi all -

 This is a bit of a strange request, perhaps; I thought it might fit into this thread rather than creating a new one.... Let's see, where to begin...

 I am looking to identify a star for a kind of art-project/"gift" for a friend; while I know all of the "naming" services are total frauds, I thought it would be fun to name a star with some astrological significance as a personal gift for a friend, something we can share between the two of us (that obviously would be recognized by no one but us, LOL).

 I'd like to find information on a star (celestial coordinates, etc.) with some regard to my friend's astrological natal chart- preferably a star that hasn't already been officially named by the IAU, and one that would be visible with a telescope (the other part of the gift is that I'm buying them a goto telescope so we can look at the star, go stargazing, and learn about astronomy in general).

 The only things I really know that I'd like to adhere to are that I'd like a star in the Saggitarius constellation, and if I can find something with coordinates containing the numbers 222 and/or 444 that would be a bonus. I'm not sure how the western astrological zodiac really correlates with actual astronomical positions- but if there is any correlation, my friend's natal chart indicates a rising sign at "3 degrees saggitarius"; again having no idea if this "degree" designation has any basis in  astronomical reality (I don't know if that position is based on the earth or some other point of the solar system- I think that is based on the earth's relative position so perhaps it's irrelevant to what I'm trying to find?).

Would anyone be kind enough to help me find a star and information on it? :)

 Many thanks in advance for any help or advice!

 Cheers 

You are wise to create your own artistic certificate and choose your own star rather than send good money to one of those star naming hucksters. 

 

I am an amateur astronomer, but I understand the calculating methods of astrologers.  The first thing that you need to know is that the astronomical constellations of the zodiac have precessed about one sign to the east of the astrological signs that were determined in classical times.  Astrologers say I am a Sagittarian, but the Sun was in the constellation of Scorpius (Scorpio to astrologers) when I was born.

 

You refer to a rising sign rather than a Sun sign, but the same shift applies.   To an astrologer, the rising sign (or ascendant) is associated with the point on the ecliptic that is rising on the eastern horizon at the time of birth.  That can only be determined by knowing the exact time of birth and the latitude and longitude of the location.  Just guessing noon is not good at all, since the entire 360° zodiac moves through the ascendant in slightly less than a day. 

 

What an astrologer (or pre-19th century astronomer) calls 3° Sagittarius is what a modern astronomer refers to as a celestial longitude of 243° (0° Sagittarius is at longitude 240°).  That 243°position on the ecliptic is currently near the magnitude 3.9 star Omega Scorpii.  Its 2000.0 equatorial coordinates are RA 16:06.8 and Dec S 20°40’. 

 

Why not just name that star after your friend?  

 

For astronomical graphics, including monthly wallpaper calendar, visit:

www.CurtRenz.com/astronomical


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Posted by Centaur on Monday, December 24, 2007 2:15 AM

CoutureNoir

I pulled the info I had from the natal chart I compiled online- I unfortunately don't have all of the specific birth details because my friend was adopted- all that we know is that she was born on September 24, 1951, in Boston MA. I don't have a birth time so I used 12:00 noon.  

I’m following up with more after looking at your second post.  If your friend has access to a birth certificate, the time should be there.  If you really cannot obtain a birth time, then you will never have any idea what the rising sign (ascendant) is.  Therefore, I suggest going with the Sun sign, as most people do.

 

If we have to assume a noon birth time, then the Sun was at what astrologers call 00°48’ Libra when your friend was born.  In 1951.7 equatorial coordinates that is RA 12:02.9 and Dec S 00°19’.  That is a spot devoid of bright stars in the constellation of Virgo.

 

For astronomical graphics, including monthly wallpaper calendar, visit:

www.CurtRenz.com/astronomical


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Posted by Anonymous on Monday, January 21, 2008 10:53 AM

Hello all!

I'm new to the astronomy scene as well and need some help finding coordinates to a star.  The star lies just to the "north-east" of Aquarius RA22h36m49.69s D-0 degrees24'9.57" ...since I'm looking at a flat map "north-east" is the only way I know how to identify the area. Any help would be great.  Also is there an online system where you can type in these coordinates and actually see the star or the general area of that star?

 

Thanks!

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Posted by Kevin Bozard on Monday, January 21, 2008 1:59 PM

You might try The SkyView Virtual Observatory. Enter the RA and DEC in the "Quick SkyView Image" box, and select DSS as the survey. Click the "GO" button and it will take you to an image with those coordinates centered in the image. Enter the coordinates as shown below:

22h36m49.69s 0 24.957

 

Hope this helps! Smile 

"Good friends are like stars, you don't always see them, but you know they're always there."

kevinbozard.com

Equipment (so far): C6R-GT, C 80ED, Orion XT8, Orion XT10, Coronado PST, Zhumell 20x80 Binos

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Posted by Centaur on Monday, January 21, 2008 2:12 PM

Tipped Libran

I'm new to the astronomy scene as well and need some help finding coordinates to a star.  The star lies just to the "north-east" of Aquarius RA22h36m49.69s D-0 degrees24'9.57" ...since I'm looking at a flat map "north-east" is the only way I know how to identify the area. Any help would be great.  Also is there an online system where you can type in these coordinates and actually see the star or the general area of that star

Welcome to the discussion group, Tipped Libran.

Is this a location provided by one of those phony outfits that accepts money for putting your designated name of a star in a book that they self-publish?  If so, please note that it is the International Astronomical Union that officially gives names to astronomical objects.  The IAU charges no fees, unlike companies with similar names that boldly advertise on the radio before major gift-giving holidays.  The stars that scammers peddle are invisible to the naked eye and each company often utilizes the same stars as their competitors.

You did not give the epoch of your star’s coordinates.  Typically that would be 2000.0.  A star’s position changes over time, mainly due to precession.  You also do not state whether the declination is north or south.  Either way, it would be close to the celestial equator (0°)  in northern Aquarius and near to Pegasus and Pisces.  I hope you’re aware that in a standard star map north is up and east is to the left, because we are supposedly looking upward while with a terrestrial map we are looking downward.

The 2000.0 coordinates of the magnitude 4.02 star Eta Aquarii are right ascension 22:35:21.4 and declination S (or -) 00°07’3.0”.    Your given coordinates (whether north or south declination) are a bit to the east (left) of that in a region where there are no stars visible to the naked eye.

 

For astronomical graphics, including monthly wallpaper calendar, visit:

www.CurtRenz.com/astronomical


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Posted by Anonymous on Sunday, February 10, 2008 6:55 PM

I have been given these coordinates and do not know how to use them. can some one help me with this. thank you ra12h47m23s d-07 13'

virgo ra12h47m23.15s  d-07 12' 58.03"

looks like german to me

lol

thank you

carlos enrique

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Posted by chipdatajeffB on Sunday, February 10, 2008 7:52 PM

CARLOS ENRIQUE

virgo ra12h47m23.15s  d-07 12' 58.03"

Carlos: This object is in the northeastern part of the constellation Virgo. Here's what the numbers mean:

ra12h47m23.15s 

RA is Right Acension and is the "hour angle" of the object along an East/West circle in the sky we call the celestial equator. To better imagine what it means, think of it as something like the object's "longitude" in the sky.

d-07 12' 58.03"

This is the object's DEC (declination), which is it's angular distance along a North/South line in degrees from the celestial equator. You could think of this as the object's "latitude" in the sky.

Given the above coordinates, this object is highest in the sky right now (early February) at about noon local time. To see it in the night sky at the same position at, say, 9 p.m. local time, you would have to wait until mid-May.

I'll post again shortly with an object identification if I can. I'll have to look that up.

UPDATE: This object is either a dim star or a very dim galaxy. It does not show up in my charts and when I look it up using software I find nothing in the area that is naked-eye visible. The nearest stars to this point which are shown on my charts are Mag. 12. There are a number of very dim galaxies listed (between Mag. 14 and Mag. 22) very nearby, but I don't see a listing for one with these exact coordinates. This area is a part of the sky along one edge of a region we call The Realm of the Galaxies. In an area of just a few square degrees several thousand galaxies appear on deep-sky photographic survey plates.

Click the link in Kevin Bozard's reply, above, to see an image from the Deep Sky Survey centered on your coordinates.

The universe is not only stranger than we imagine, it's stranger than we CAN imagine. --- JBS Haldane

Come visit me at Comanche Springs Astronomy Campus (we're on Google Maps) in Texas.

www.3rf.org

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Posted by Centaur on Sunday, February 10, 2008 11:03 PM

CARLOS ENRIQUE

I have been given these coordinates and do not know how to use them. can some one help me with this. thank you ra12h47m23s d-07 13'

virgo ra12h47m23.15s  d-07 12' 58.03"

  

Welcome to the discussion group, Carlos.

It is during the days surrounding Valentine’s Day, Mother’s Day and Christmas that we get these requests.  They are often from those who responded to hucksters in radio commercials that attempt to collect money from people on the promise to put their suggested name for a star in a vanity book that the seller self-publishes.  I hope you were not one of those buyers.  It would be better if those buyers questioned us before making a purchase rather than after. 

Copyrighting a book does not authenticate anything it contains; it’s merely protection for the author against plagiarism.  The International Astronomical Union is the only organization that officially names celestial bodies.  They charge no fees.  My friends at the Adler Planetarium are driven crazy when they have to look duped visitors in the eyes and tell them the truth.  None of this may apply to you, but it is said with the hope of preventing others who are reading this from making a mistake.

Since you don’t say, I will assume that the position you were given for the star was for the epoch at the beginning of the year 2000.  I will further assume that d-07 refers to a southern declination.  The position is in southwestern Virgo.  I agree with Jeff that there are no stars visible to the naked eye at your given coordinates.

 

For astronomical graphics, including monthly wallpaper calendar, visit:

www.CurtRenz.com/astronomical


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Posted by Anonymous on Wednesday, March 19, 2008 10:58 AM

I would rather give her a astrological chart as this is a significant year for the 
Sagittariuses as Pluto transits to Capricorn.
 
check here for more about the transit if she believe in astrology she may want a chart. 
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Posted by lancestarr on Wednesday, September 02, 2009 6:38 PM
I have one im trying to find also, but not for a contest. =p I have no idea how to translate into DD:HH:SS etc, so I need help =/ It's registration number is SAO 323239 RA: 103.6750002 DEC: -31.79279138 Should be in the pisces area i think. Whoever find its, could you please post a pic also? zoomed out one preferred. Thanks
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Posted by Centaur on Wednesday, September 02, 2009 8:48 PM

lancestarr
I have one im trying to find also, but not for a contest. =p

Welcome to the discussion group, lancestar.

 

I certainly hope it does not pertain to a star listed by one of those phony outfits we’ve been discussing in this thread, that pretend they can officially name a star in return for some credulous person’s money.

 

For astronomical graphics, including monthly wallpaper calendar, visit:

www.CurtRenz.com/astronomical


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