Shields up! Scientists work to produce 'Star Trek' deflector device

1107 views
13 replies
1 rating 2 rating 3 rating 4 rating 5 rating
  • Member since
    November, 2009
Shields up! Scientists work to produce 'Star Trek' deflector device
Posted by Poppa Chris on Thursday, October 31, 2013 1:54 PM

---Poppa Chris---

Denham Springs, Louisiana USA

"Second star to the right - Then straight on until morning!" - Peter Pan

Celestron CPC1100GPS (XLT) - 279mm aperature, 2800mm Focal length. (f10) Celestron Ultima LX (70deg AFOV) Eyepieces 32mm thru 5mm, Canon EOS Rebel T2i DSLR, Backyard EOS imaging software, Orion Star Shoot Planetary Imager IV, Celestron Skymaster 15x70 binoculars

 

  • Member since
    August, 2007
Posted by Primordial on Friday, November 01, 2013 8:49 AM

Poppa Chris : Thank you for the link, the one tested in the plasma looks good, but redundancy is better. The one using water ( the hydrogen atom ) and the one tested in the plasma chamber would make a good pair, but let us have another for the unknown, right or maybe two. After all they will be dealing with high energy gamma, X-ray and neutrons, and need something with an absorption cross section suitable for these guys. .Just think about it.

  • Member since
    November, 2009
Posted by Poppa Chris on Saturday, November 02, 2013 1:01 PM

Can't think about it too, much.  Makes my head hurt...

Laugh

---Poppa Chris---

Denham Springs, Louisiana USA

"Second star to the right - Then straight on until morning!" - Peter Pan

Celestron CPC1100GPS (XLT) - 279mm aperature, 2800mm Focal length. (f10) Celestron Ultima LX (70deg AFOV) Eyepieces 32mm thru 5mm, Canon EOS Rebel T2i DSLR, Backyard EOS imaging software, Orion Star Shoot Planetary Imager IV, Celestron Skymaster 15x70 binoculars

 

  • Member since
    August, 2007
Posted by Primordial on Saturday, November 02, 2013 2:45 PM

Poppa Chris : I like the new photo.

  • Member since
    November, 2009
Posted by Poppa Chris on Saturday, November 02, 2013 5:28 PM

Primordial

Poppa Chris : I like the new photo.

 

Well... It is the season to "Gobble 'til you wobble!"  Dinner

---Poppa Chris---

Denham Springs, Louisiana USA

"Second star to the right - Then straight on until morning!" - Peter Pan

Celestron CPC1100GPS (XLT) - 279mm aperature, 2800mm Focal length. (f10) Celestron Ultima LX (70deg AFOV) Eyepieces 32mm thru 5mm, Canon EOS Rebel T2i DSLR, Backyard EOS imaging software, Orion Star Shoot Planetary Imager IV, Celestron Skymaster 15x70 binoculars

 

  • Member since
    October, 2007
Posted by Aratus on Monday, November 04, 2013 4:18 AM

I've often thought that 'deflecting' harmful radiation would be better than trying to block it.  This sort of radiation tends to create even more harmful particles if you use physical barriers.   The trick is to find a practical way of doing it.

Aratus

Location:  North West Devon, UK

-------------------------------------------------

Celestron Nexstar8i (8" SCT).

Celestron Skymaster binoculars 15x70

Other:0.63 & 0.33 correctors. X2 & X4 barlow.

Imagers: Meade DSI & Celestron NexImage.  Canon EOS 550D

 

 

  • Member since
    November, 2009
Posted by Poppa Chris on Monday, November 04, 2013 6:01 AM

Radiation such as this also applies a force to whatever it strikes (hence, we have designs for solar sails) These forces can be equated to friction in a way.  Therefore finding a way to deflect them around the spacecraft would reduce this "friction" and therefore make the craft both faster and more efficient along with being safer for the crew.  Who knows, maybe we will find a way to collect some of the energy rather than just deflecting all of it and make our future ships self-refueling. 

 

---Poppa Chris---

Denham Springs, Louisiana USA

"Second star to the right - Then straight on until morning!" - Peter Pan

Celestron CPC1100GPS (XLT) - 279mm aperature, 2800mm Focal length. (f10) Celestron Ultima LX (70deg AFOV) Eyepieces 32mm thru 5mm, Canon EOS Rebel T2i DSLR, Backyard EOS imaging software, Orion Star Shoot Planetary Imager IV, Celestron Skymaster 15x70 binoculars

 

  • Member since
    August, 2007
Posted by Primordial on Monday, November 04, 2013 9:08 AM

Aratus : I agree, however some of these duys ar the bull on block,; energy wise, and out there we need extra coverage. Here on Earth we have the atmosphere and deflection. I think with the experiment in space, which they want, is a good idea to determine the needed protection. Remember this is going to be a lone trip, if they can plan redundancy in both protection with supply necessity, you get efficiency. Just an opinion.

  • Member since
    August, 2007
Posted by Primordial on Monday, November 04, 2013 9:37 AM

Poppa Chris : What about a fully gimbled parabolic reflector on the rear which could use the solar winds to assist in propultion, of course you would need to slave that to a microprocessor controled star gazer and inertial corrected navagational guidence system capable of remote access by mission control. The way I see it the faster you travel away from the sun the fewer particles from the sun you would need to deflect. However I don't think they could ever catch or out run the solar winds, that would be really fast ( some estimates near the sun range at 500k miles per hr. to about one million miles per hr.). Just an opinion.

  • Member since
    November, 2009
Posted by Poppa Chris on Monday, November 04, 2013 10:57 AM

Primordial

Poppa Chris : What about a fully gimbled parabolic reflector on the rear which could use the solar winds to assist in propultion, of course you would need to slave that to a microprocessor controled star gazer and inertial corrected navagational guidence system capable of remote access by mission control. The way I see it the faster you travel away from the sun the fewer particles from the sun you would need to deflect. However I don't think they could ever catch or out run the solar winds, that would be really fast ( some estimates near the sun range at 500k miles per hr. to about one million miles per hr.). Just an opinion.

 

If you think that would work, why not?

I agree, As you get further out from the Sun there will be less to deflect but the need to collect would also increase in order to maintain the energy capture levels.  I think Relativity would keep us from ever outrunning the radiation moving at the speed of light.

But once we get so far out, past the solar wind, there would then be inerstellar radiation to deal with.  Would it be coming at our hypothetical ship from random directions all at once?  That would certainly make the balance between deflection and collection a more complicated issue.  Maybe there are "currents" of radiation sort of like a celestial Gulf Stream that we could ride to traverse interstallar space.  Such currents, if stable and reliable, could be mapped and "shipping lanes" charted out for interstellar commerce.

---Poppa Chris---

Denham Springs, Louisiana USA

"Second star to the right - Then straight on until morning!" - Peter Pan

Celestron CPC1100GPS (XLT) - 279mm aperature, 2800mm Focal length. (f10) Celestron Ultima LX (70deg AFOV) Eyepieces 32mm thru 5mm, Canon EOS Rebel T2i DSLR, Backyard EOS imaging software, Orion Star Shoot Planetary Imager IV, Celestron Skymaster 15x70 binoculars

 

  • Member since
    August, 2007
Posted by Primordial on Monday, November 04, 2013 12:53 PM

Poppa Chris : I think you are on track, the people at the soth pole catch some of the neutrinos, also at Earth's surface some high energy particles can be detected coming from random directions, although I'm certain some are the result of scattering by the atmosphere which originate as solar winds or CME's.

Yes, I agree interstaller travel should have currents with hot ( high energy ) low density matter, but consider this, dark matter in intergalictic travel, if I'm not mistaken, dark matter is thought to come in both hot and cold states, and with a condition like that to traverse at extreme velocities this could generate problems. Boy, I wish we only had to solve that problem, but I'll be long gone by then. Ha!.

  • Member since
    November, 2009
Posted by Poppa Chris on Monday, November 04, 2013 1:24 PM

Dark matter in motion still equates to free energy if we can tap it.  But for now, I'll try to limit my thinking to intragalactic travel and leave the intergalactic travel for later.  So much to explore here in our own Milky Way. 

---Poppa Chris---

Denham Springs, Louisiana USA

"Second star to the right - Then straight on until morning!" - Peter Pan

Celestron CPC1100GPS (XLT) - 279mm aperature, 2800mm Focal length. (f10) Celestron Ultima LX (70deg AFOV) Eyepieces 32mm thru 5mm, Canon EOS Rebel T2i DSLR, Backyard EOS imaging software, Orion Star Shoot Planetary Imager IV, Celestron Skymaster 15x70 binoculars

 

  • Member since
    October, 2005
Posted by leo731 on Monday, November 04, 2013 1:40 PM

Fascinating article. 

As an aside to a busy "Trek" week it has been anounced that the captain of the U.S. Navy's newest and most advanced destroyer is going to be James Kirk. 

The older we get the more Star Trek seems to have gotten the technology right.

L

A nebula in the eyepiece is worth two in the Atlas.

  • Member since
    August, 2007
Posted by Primordial on Monday, November 04, 2013 6:29 PM

Leo731; That's a good one. I know where you are coming from, it's almost as if the next big thing will be TRILITIUM crystals. Ha!. Just an opinion.

Join our Community!

Our community is FREE to join. To participate you must either login or register for an account.

ADVERTISEMENT

FREE EMAIL NEWSLETTER

Receive news, sky-event information, observing tips, and more from Astronomy's weekly email newsletter.

ADVERTISEMENT
ADVERTISEMENT
Find us on Facebook

Loading...