Low Tech Adventure to the Edge of Space

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  • Member since
    October, 2005
Low Tech Adventure to the Edge of Space
Posted by leo731 on Tuesday, October 22, 2013 2:08 PM

Just read this today of a rather interesting and cheaper way for tourists to spend time at the edge of space.  I think if I could afford the $75,000 ticket this would be the way to go as it would be a far more scenic and long lasting ride:

http://news.discovery.com/space/private-spaceflight/taking-a-balloon-ride-to-the-edge-of-space-photos-131022.htm

L

A nebula in the eyepiece is worth two in the Atlas.

  • Member since
    October, 2007
Posted by Aratus on Thursday, October 24, 2013 2:56 PM

The curvature of the Earth at 30km is not so different as it would be at say 120km.   You wouldn't see as far though.   To illustrate this I have included what a certain feature around California would look like at 30 km and 120 km.

   

Aratus

Location:  North West Devon, UK

-------------------------------------------------

Celestron Nexstar8i (8" SCT).

Celestron Skymaster binoculars 15x70

Other:0.63 & 0.33 correctors. X2 & X4 barlow.

Imagers: Meade DSI & Celestron NexImage.  Canon EOS 550D

 

 

  • Member since
    October, 2005
Posted by leo731 on Friday, October 25, 2013 6:11 PM

A very good graphic Aratus.  I think the difference in view isn't too great in relationship to spending $75,000 or $250,000. One would not experience zero-g but on the other hand one would have hours to gaze upon the Earth while the other more expensive option will give one only minutes of prime viewing time. 

Thanks for the comparative views Aratus,

L

A nebula in the eyepiece is worth two in the Atlas.

  • Member since
    October, 2007
Posted by Aratus on Sunday, October 27, 2013 9:29 AM

My pleasure.   The views come courtesy of 'Starry Night'.  

I think if you are going to spend the money, then you need time to savour the event.   Sub-orbital is ok, but I would rather take this balloon approach, or go to orbit.    I never lose interest in looking down at the Earth.

If the balloon rope was severed at 30km it would give you a minute or two of freefall - followed by a free burial, of course!!Big Smile

(78 seconds without air resistance or terminal velocity!)

 

Aratus

Location:  North West Devon, UK

-------------------------------------------------

Celestron Nexstar8i (8" SCT).

Celestron Skymaster binoculars 15x70

Other:0.63 & 0.33 correctors. X2 & X4 barlow.

Imagers: Meade DSI & Celestron NexImage.  Canon EOS 550D

 

 

  • Member since
    October, 2005
Posted by leo731 on Friday, November 01, 2013 11:35 AM

If the balloon rope was severed at 30km it would give you a minute or two of freefall - followed by a free burial, of course!!Big Smile

 

Laugh

Never thought it that far through.  L

A nebula in the eyepiece is worth two in the Atlas.

  • Member since
    October, 2007
Posted by Aratus on Friday, November 01, 2013 6:10 PM

It is in my nature to weigh up the pros and consIdea

I was also waiting for someone to work it out with terminal velocity and air resistance!Smile    I don't think it would be worth prematurely shuffling off my mortal coil for 78 seconds of freefall.

Aratus

Location:  North West Devon, UK

-------------------------------------------------

Celestron Nexstar8i (8" SCT).

Celestron Skymaster binoculars 15x70

Other:0.63 & 0.33 correctors. X2 & X4 barlow.

Imagers: Meade DSI & Celestron NexImage.  Canon EOS 550D

 

 

  • Member since
    October, 2005
Posted by leo731 on Monday, November 04, 2013 1:34 PM

Actually free-fall for a few minutes in Spaceship I or a terminal fall from a balloon seem hardly worth it when zero-g is far easier to simulate in a "vomit comet" flight.   In any case it would be the view that would be the spur to visiting near space and not the ride.  I guess I should be happy enough to have flown at a more sedate speed and altitude on many occasions. 

L

A nebula in the eyepiece is worth two in the Atlas.

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