Voyager 1 probe becomes first man-made object to leave solar system

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Voyager 1 probe becomes first man-made object to leave solar system
Posted by Poppa Chris on Thursday, September 12, 2013 1:14 PM

---Poppa Chris---

Denham Springs, Louisiana USA

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Posted by DaveMitsky on Thursday, September 12, 2013 3:57 PM

I heard the announcement on NPR today.

There's more at www.universetoday.com/.../its-official-voyager-1-is-now-in-interstellar-space

Dave Mitsky

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Posted by Antitax on Thursday, September 12, 2013 4:21 PM

  Vintage electronics rule! While they routinely lose contact and/or control with modern probes and satellites, a mid-seventies-era piece of gear still ticks!

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Posted by DaveMitsky on Thursday, September 12, 2013 5:02 PM

There's another article at science.nasa.gov/.../12sep_voyager1

Dave Mitsky

Sic itur ad astra!

Chance favors the prepared mind.

A man is a small thing, and the night is very large and full of wonders.

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Posted by stars4life on Thursday, September 12, 2013 7:24 PM

Nice!

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Posted by Primordial on Thursday, September 12, 2013 8:25 PM

Thanks for the links, great news.

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Posted by Poppa Chris on Thursday, September 12, 2013 8:45 PM

Yep Voyagers 1 and 2 are officially the "Eveready Bunnies" of all space probes.

---Poppa Chris---

Denham Springs, Louisiana USA

"Second star to the right - Then straight on until morning!" - Peter Pan

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Posted by Aratus on Sunday, September 15, 2013 3:18 PM

If I might be a tiny bit controversial but . . . .  has it ever been officially established that the heliopause is the edge of the Solar System?       It is perfectly possible for objects to orbit the sun beyond the heliopause so I would have thought that Roche's determination of gravitational influence would be a better definition.    

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Posted by Primordial on Monday, September 16, 2013 8:54 AM

Aratus : You have a point, how did we obtain the value of total mass ( Including dark matter's mass ) contained within the solar system used to calculate the escape velocity prior to launch(?).

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Posted by Aratus on Monday, September 16, 2013 11:27 AM

 Roche determined that there was an area around a celestial body within which it was possible to orbit that body.   This is sometimes called the 'Roche Sphere'.  Anything moving beyond that limit cannot go into orbit.  I was wondering if that, applied to the Sun/ Solar system, might be a more useful definition of the extent of the solar system.    

Aratus

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Posted by Primordial on Monday, September 16, 2013 12:54 PM

Aratus : I don't remember that limit, but then sometimes I can't rember my name. I would assume however the Oort cloud would be na orbiting intity of the solar system. The Roche limit property which is outstanding most in my logic is the resultant vectors of gravitional forces between two seperate mass' on their seperate local vectors domains. This object ( the spacecraft as a whole ) may have some gravitationally local vectored aspects, I don't know, but this should not prevent the craft from the ability to exit the solar system if it has the escape velocity. As far as defining interstellar space domain, I would set it past the orbit of any KNOWN orbiting ( Or as you state, a zone at which an orbit of the solar system could be eatablished by KNOWN concepts such as Shepherding.) , just my thoughts.

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Posted by Aratus on Monday, September 16, 2013 4:13 PM

I'm not doubting that Voyager will exist the solar system.   I'm  just wondering where that edge might be.Smile   The Roche sphere will contain any object orbiting the Sun.   Anything outside the 'sphere' is too far away to orbit.   It seems a useful definition to me.

btw.   The Roche 'sphere' is different from the Roche 'limit'.     Same man, Edouard Roche, but a different concept.   There is also the 'Roche lobe', just to confuse things further !!Geeked  

Aratus

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Posted by Primordial on Monday, September 16, 2013 4:44 PM

Aratus :I looked at the definition of Roche Sphere and wiki brings up Hill Sphere, It looks to me eack star system has the gravitational domain which reaches to an adjoining star systems Hill Sphere. so with this parameter interstaller space looks to me as being either zero between Roche limits or from our star to the nearest most significant Roche Sphere of another star system as mapped in the six degrees of freedom. What do you think (?).

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Posted by Aratus on Tuesday, September 17, 2013 8:41 AM

I see what you mean.  However, I wasn't suggesting that the galaxy should consist entirely of solar systems stuck together like a group of soap bubbles! Big Smile      I think each solar system will have a definite edge, and in most cases be completely separate.  

I don't want to get bogged down with defining Roche Spheres or Hill Spheres, but I am thinking of a sphere of gravitational influence within which the Sun's gravity dominates sufficiently that external influences cannot prevent a small body form orbiting the Sun. 

Any such object would be part of the solar system, and therefore the 'edge' would be beyond that.

Aratus

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Posted by Primordial on Tuesday, September 17, 2013 10:18 AM

Aratus : Yes, I agree, it should be simple but then I guess simple can become complex in science. I thought the Oort cloud would be a possible edge, but I think they are looking for a specific matter energy density which occupies this space. To give an analogy It is similar to sea pressure and bow pressure they are looking for sea pressure with out turbulence now after seeing bow pressure and turbulence, or if you are familiar with aircraft, they are looking for static pressure with out turbulence, not ram pressure after seeing ram pressure and turbulence. Just my opinion.

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Posted by Aratus on Tuesday, September 17, 2013 1:13 PM

I admit it would be nice to include the Oort cloud within the Solar System, but if the objects in the cloud are being perturbed by external gravitational forces, that would rule them out. (under my definition)   However, perhaps gravity disturbance isn't the way we get those comets, so they could be included.  Perhaps I can see why some people want to go for the heliopause as the edge of the Solar System!

Aratus

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Posted by Primordial on Tuesday, September 17, 2013 1:27 PM

Aratus : I guess we will have to go along with who carries the big club and make the choices. Ha!

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Posted by lupuliniac on Tuesday, September 17, 2013 3:26 PM

I think  we should send a probe or two to make some observations before we rush to define . . . oh wait!

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Posted by Aratus on Saturday, September 21, 2013 4:27 PM

Primordial

Aratus : I guess we will have to go along with who carries the big club and make the choices. Ha!

 

Nothing new there!Smile

lupuliniac

I think  we should send a probe or two to make some observations before we rush to define . . . oh wait!

 

Big Smile We would be waiting.  Still, the sooner we launch, the sooner we will learn.

Aratus

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Posted by Primordial on Saturday, September 21, 2013 7:56 PM

Aratus : was there another craft with the name Horizons, which if I remember correctly, was traveling into the outer extremes of our solar system (?), correct me if I'm mistaken. Maybe we can gain access to information ( ionization, etc.) within this new found territory sooner than we might expect. If the Oort cloud has an effect on this territory ( similar to the activity in a bay compared to the open ocean.), decisions may be made to identify accordingly. Just dreaming.

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Posted by DaveMitsky on Saturday, September 21, 2013 8:29 PM

Primordial,

You're thinking of the New Horizons mission to Pluto and the Kuiper Belt. That probe is currently "just" 27.37 a.u. from the Sun and won't reach Pluto until 2015.  Pluto's average distance from the Sun is 39.5 a.u.

http://pluto.jhuapl.edu/

http://pluto.jhuapl.edu/mission/whereis_nh.php

http://www.nasa.gov/mission_pages/newhorizons/main/index.html#.Uj5GHoasjTo

OTOH, Voyager 1 is currently 125.50 a.u. from the Sun.

http://voyager.jpl.nasa.gov/where/

The Oort Cloud may begin at  from 1,000 to 5,000 a.u. and extend to 100,000 a.u. from the Sun.

http://lcogt.net/spacebook/comets-kuiper-belt-and-oort-cloud

http://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/0/03/Kuiper_oort.jpg

http://www.nasa.gov/mission_pages/voyager/multimedia/pia17046.html#.Uj5I-oasjTo

Dave Mitsky

Sic itur ad astra!

Chance favors the prepared mind.

A man is a small thing, and the night is very large and full of wonders.

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Posted by Primordial on Saturday, September 21, 2013 9:55 PM

DaveMitsky : Thanks for the links.

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