Nasa says Mars mystery rock that ‘appeared’ from nowhere is ‘like nothing we’ve seen before’

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  • Member since
    November, 2009
Nasa says Mars mystery rock that ‘appeared’ from nowhere is ‘like nothing we’ve seen before’
Posted by Poppa Chris on Monday, January 20, 2014 1:20 PM

http://www.independent.co.uk/news/science/nasa-says-mars-mystery-rock-that-appeared-from-nowhere-is-like-nothing-weve-ever-seen-before-9070323.html

 

This is just too weird...

But one point to mention iis that "Opportunity" Is proving to be the Eveready Rabbit of Mars rovers. 

---Poppa Chris---

Denham Springs, Louisiana USA

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Posted by Aratus on Monday, January 20, 2014 2:47 PM

Intriguing.  However it got there, it has not disturbed any other stones in the area.   The wheels are now moving very slowly; are they likely to flick up stones that kind of distance?    I did wonder if it might have been a piece of the rover which had dropped off, but presumably that has been discounted. 

Aratus

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Posted by leo731 on Monday, January 20, 2014 3:30 PM

I hope this is real.  Nothing on this from either Space.com nor JPL.   Doesn't mean its an internet hoax but it seems a bit odd and the quote, "Its like nothing we have seen before." is a quote direct from Mr. Spock.

Still, I believe they wil find the answer and it will be rather mundane.  Until then here is my idea:

A nebula in the eyepiece is worth two in the Atlas.

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Posted by Poppa Chris on Monday, January 20, 2014 4:17 PM

It is a real article.  With images to support it. Besides the article from the UK I linked above, there is another one on CNN.com.

http://www.cnn.com/2014/01/20/tech/innovation/mars-mystery-rock/index.html?hpt=hp_t2

 

---Poppa Chris---

Denham Springs, Louisiana USA

"Second star to the right - Then straight on until morning!" - Peter Pan

Celestron CPC1100GPS (XLT) - 279mm aperature, 2800mm Focal length. (f10) Celestron Ultima LX (70deg AFOV) Eyepieces 32mm thru 5mm, Canon EOS Rebel T2i DSLR, Backyard EOS imaging software, Orion Star Shoot Planetary Imager IV, Celestron Skymaster 15x70 binoculars

 

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  • From: Texas
Posted by chipdatajeffB on Tuesday, January 21, 2014 3:32 PM

If it's about rocks AND it's about space, I'm there! ... I have been going through the Opportunity archive images and it did, indeed, "just appear" ... There are several different frames of that one particular image. I download them and manipulated them several different ways, but have no clue what this rock is.

There is, however, what appears to be a "scuff mark" or "bounce mark" just to the left of the rock and slightly above it in the image. This mark appears in an area of "looser" soil between some of the desert basement rocks. If it is, indeed, a scuff mark, then the rock may have come from "screen left" of the photo.

The composition is very intriguing ... I look forward to what comes out of the past few days' research on this.

The universe is not only stranger than we imagine, it's stranger than we CAN imagine. --- JBS Haldane

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Posted by Aratus on Tuesday, January 21, 2014 4:00 PM

Is there anything to indicate the size of the object?

Aratus

Location:  North West Devon, UK

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  • Member since
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Posted by leo731 on Tuesday, January 21, 2014 6:26 PM

Sorry Chris it is indeed real.  I was just being overly suspicious.  What it is remains an open question though it appears that the researchers involved are hotly debating the rock at this time.  I did get a chuckle from one service that opined that Homer Simpson might be called for a consulatation in order to eliminate the possibility of this object being a jelly donut.

Confused

L

A nebula in the eyepiece is worth two in the Atlas.

  • Member since
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Posted by Poppa Chris on Tuesday, January 21, 2014 7:01 PM

No apologies needed. I didn't take your comment negatively. I just wanted to reiterate that is was a real report and not bogus.

---Poppa Chris---

Denham Springs, Louisiana USA

"Second star to the right - Then straight on until morning!" - Peter Pan

Celestron CPC1100GPS (XLT) - 279mm aperature, 2800mm Focal length. (f10) Celestron Ultima LX (70deg AFOV) Eyepieces 32mm thru 5mm, Canon EOS Rebel T2i DSLR, Backyard EOS imaging software, Orion Star Shoot Planetary Imager IV, Celestron Skymaster 15x70 binoculars

 

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Posted by zachsdad on Wednesday, January 22, 2014 7:40 AM
Obviously the object is what remains after a rover scares the crap out of a martian.

Terry's Law of Cosmology: "Light travels faster than sound. That's why some people appear bright until you hear them speak."

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Posted by StarFarmer on Wednesday, January 22, 2014 7:40 AM

I've read the article(s) and seen the before and after pictures.  In the "before" picture a dark, round pattern is seen very near the "after" picture's bright doughnut ring.  Could the rover, or something else, kicked up some particulate then it formed on the upward ridge of the depression?  Think dry ice kicked up by a Martian dust devil.

I remember when a rover's dragging wheel exposed something similar.  NASA said that in a way, that wheel problem was a blessing.  According to WIKI:  "A phenomenon named Dry Ice Storms was proposed to occur over the polar regions of Mars.  They are comparable to Earth's thunderstorms with crystalline CO2 taking the place of water in the clouds."

All I know for sure is it's very early and staring at it is making me hungry.  I have to get something to go with this coffee.

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Posted by Iggle on Wednesday, January 22, 2014 3:41 PM

Aratus
The wheels are now moving very slowly; are they likely to flick up stones that kind of distance?

Aratus, I thought the same thing.  It is hard to imagine the rover flicking a rock like that.  I suppose it could have been stuck to the wheel and fallen off, though.  Martian road kill?

In the before picture, it looks as though there is a donut-shaped depression in the bedrock near where the new rock appears (new rock seems just slightly offset to the left).  I was wondering if it could have bubbled up through there somehow?  Water bubbling up which then froze as soon as it was exposed on the surface, perhaps.  I must admit that this seems as far-fetched as all the other explanations.

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