What are the most astro-friendly cities?

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  • Member since
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What are the most astro-friendly cities?
Posted by Antitax on Friday, September 27, 2013 4:18 AM

   What are the most astro-friendly cities?

TS 8x40 Wildlife, 10x50 Marine/Fujinon 16x70/TS 80mm triplet, 6x30 finder, EQ-3 mount, TS 2" 99% diagonal/Celestron C5+ and 6x30 finder, DIY tripod/5" Bahtinov/12" GSO dob, 8x50 finder/Meade 2" 24mm 82°/Hyperion 24,13,10mm 68°/TS Expanse 17mm 70°/SW 7mm Panorama 82°/Ultima 2x barlow/Astronomik UHC-E filter/Baader O-III/Astro Solar 5" & 80mm filters/Sky Atlas 2000/Rükl's Moon Atlas/Canon 400D/5mW green laser

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Posted by Antitax on Sunday, September 29, 2013 1:48 PM

   There's not a single one. Stick out tongue

TS 8x40 Wildlife, 10x50 Marine/Fujinon 16x70/TS 80mm triplet, 6x30 finder, EQ-3 mount, TS 2" 99% diagonal/Celestron C5+ and 6x30 finder, DIY tripod/5" Bahtinov/12" GSO dob, 8x50 finder/Meade 2" 24mm 82°/Hyperion 24,13,10mm 68°/TS Expanse 17mm 70°/SW 7mm Panorama 82°/Ultima 2x barlow/Astronomik UHC-E filter/Baader O-III/Astro Solar 5" & 80mm filters/Sky Atlas 2000/Rükl's Moon Atlas/Canon 400D/5mW green laser

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Posted by DaveMitsky on Sunday, September 29, 2013 6:26 PM

Sic itur ad astra!

Chance favors the prepared mind.

A man is a small thing, and the night is very large and full of wonders.

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Posted by Antitax on Sunday, September 29, 2013 8:20 PM

   Flagstaff is a good place to move to, but I kinda misasked my question. By quering which cities are astro-friendly I assumed people would automatically add how their own city helps stargazing or not. But I should have asked clearly: which cities do you know as astro-friendly, and how astro-friendly is your own city?

TS 8x40 Wildlife, 10x50 Marine/Fujinon 16x70/TS 80mm triplet, 6x30 finder, EQ-3 mount, TS 2" 99% diagonal/Celestron C5+ and 6x30 finder, DIY tripod/5" Bahtinov/12" GSO dob, 8x50 finder/Meade 2" 24mm 82°/Hyperion 24,13,10mm 68°/TS Expanse 17mm 70°/SW 7mm Panorama 82°/Ultima 2x barlow/Astronomik UHC-E filter/Baader O-III/Astro Solar 5" & 80mm filters/Sky Atlas 2000/Rükl's Moon Atlas/Canon 400D/5mW green laser

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Posted by Sky Captain & Pippin on Tuesday, October 15, 2013 10:05 AM

Eldorado, Texas. The "X-Bar Ranch," caters to A. Astronomers and P. Astronomers alike. " Been there, got the T- Shirt."

Very small light domes that do not interfer with observing. Owner, very friendly. Cabins reasonable and air conditioned.

Had an outstanding week.

Gliese 1214b

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  • From: Texas
Posted by chipdatajeffB on Tuesday, October 15, 2013 10:23 AM

Another small Texas town, Crowell, at the base of The Panhandle, is the most astronomer-friendly place on Earth (well, Coonabarabran, Australia, is a close second I think).

 

Crowell is home to 3RF's Comanche Springs Astronomy Campus. In the interest of full disclosure, I work there!

 

Very like the X-Bar Ranch, but more telescopes ... and better skies ...

These are not "cities" per se, having populations numbering in the few hundred, but they are great astronomy destinations.

Dallas, TX, truly qualifies as a "city", and except for its light pollution has a very active astronomy environment. Four public star parties each month (1st, 2nd, 3rd Saturdays, and 4th Sunday), as well as two Astronomy Day celebrations annually. Several of the suburbs have light-pollution abatement programs, though in the overall scheme of things they won't help much. Still ... the area treats thousands of visitors each year to views of the night sky. And the DFW area hosts 4 fully digital Imax planetariums, with several smaller digital planetariums at area community colleges and public school districts, as well as at least 4 portable StarLab planetariums.

The universe is not only stranger than we imagine, it's stranger than we CAN imagine. --- JBS Haldane

Come visit me at Comanche Springs Astronomy Campus (we're on Google Maps) in Texas.

www.3rf.org

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Posted by Antitax on Tuesday, October 15, 2013 12:30 PM

   I should have guessed the smallest cities would be best for darkness and larger ones for infrastructure.

TS 8x40 Wildlife, 10x50 Marine/Fujinon 16x70/TS 80mm triplet, 6x30 finder, EQ-3 mount, TS 2" 99% diagonal/Celestron C5+ and 6x30 finder, DIY tripod/5" Bahtinov/12" GSO dob, 8x50 finder/Meade 2" 24mm 82°/Hyperion 24,13,10mm 68°/TS Expanse 17mm 70°/SW 7mm Panorama 82°/Ultima 2x barlow/Astronomik UHC-E filter/Baader O-III/Astro Solar 5" & 80mm filters/Sky Atlas 2000/Rükl's Moon Atlas/Canon 400D/5mW green laser

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Posted by leo731 on Tuesday, October 15, 2013 1:52 PM

Super AngryQuite true Antitax.  Los Angeles has the worst light pollution of almost anywhere in the world but it boasts the very popular and welcoming Griffith Park Observatory.  One can also wander around the grounds and see the 100 inch Hooker telescope at the famous Mt. Wilson Observatory for the price of a $2.00 parking fee. One can also sign up, and pay a rather larger fee, to spend all night looking through the 60 inch telescope.

I do not live in a city but the closest one to me is Anaheim which seems bent on outpacing Las Vegas in its desire to throw light around like a wad of bills.  Oh wait, it is money that they are wasting! 

A nebula in the eyepiece is worth two in the Atlas.

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Posted by jimcle on Monday, October 21, 2013 6:03 AM

Is anyone participating in the Great World Wide star count? I find that it helps to raise awareness of the extent of light pollution.

http://www.windows2universe.org/citizen_science/starcount/

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Posted by DaveMitsky on Tuesday, November 12, 2013 11:41 AM

The following are links to some of the "astronomy villages" populated by amateur astronomers in the United States: 

http://www.arizonaskyvillage.com/ - Arizona Sky Village 

http://www.cav-sfo.com/CAV-ChieflandObserversWelcome.html - Chiefland Astronomy Village

http://www.deerlickgroup.com/ - Deerlick Astronomy Village

http://www.tomclarkbooks.com/NMAV.html - The New Mexico Astronomy Village

http://www.sierralarana.com/activities/star-gazing-dark-skies/ - Sierra la Rana

Dave Mitsky

Sic itur ad astra!

Chance favors the prepared mind.

A man is a small thing, and the night is very large and full of wonders.

  • Member since
    December, 2013
  • From: Asheville, North Carolina
Posted by Quiet_Warrior on Monday, December 09, 2013 3:29 PM

I live in Asheville, North Carolina. Our city has the light pollution law.  They are slowly but surely putting shields on all the street lights and businesses are fixing theirs also.  I do my star gazing from a little city park surrounded by trees and can see pretty good.

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