Favorite Constellation?

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  • Member since
    October, 2012
Favorite Constellation?
Posted by TeleTaurus14 on Friday, October 12, 2012 12:33 AM

What is your favorite constellation and why?

What attracts you to this constellation more than the other 87?

What are your favorite objects to view in this constellation?

 

I would have to say mine would be Orion The Hunter. I looked at this constellation for many years not knowing the make up of it or anything about it. My favorite object to view in Orion would have to the M42. I also love viewing Orion through binoculars, just because its form is beautiful and the binoculars do a great job of the wide Field of View!

 

 

-BradCool

From Rocket City, Huntsville, AL. 19 year old enthusiast and hungry for knowledge. My equipment is 10x50 and 7x21 binoculars, Meade 70mm Refractor and Orion SkyQuest XT8. Various eyepieces. As for astrophotography, only Afocal very rarely. 

  • Member since
    December, 2010
Posted by tower3 on Wednesday, October 17, 2012 7:08 PM

Sagittarius,  so many targets, something for everyone. Great with 'nocs, small and large scopes. And it's my sign (12/5/49)

EASY DUDE, THERE WILL BE ANOTHER WAVE

From San Diego, Zhumell Z10 (Bubba is for all around observing)Telrad, Vixen VMC110L on a Porta Mount II,  Bushnell 10x50 (for beach) Garrett 10x50 classics (for Sylvia), Zhumell 80x20 on their Pro tripod(cuz they were cheap and sylvia digs 'em),  1.75 readers (so I can find the other stuff)

  • Member since
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Posted by Poppa Chris on Wednesday, October 17, 2012 9:35 PM

Orion... It has M42 and the Horsehead & Running Man. What more could one ask?  

---Poppa Chris---

Denham Springs, Louisiana USA

"Second star to the right - Then straight on until morning!" - Peter Pan

Celestron CPC1100GPS (XLT) - 279mm aperature, 2800mm Focal length. (f10) Celestron Ultima LX (70deg AFOV) Eyepieces 32mm thru 5mm, Canon EOS Rebel T2i DSLR, Backyard EOS imaging software, Orion Star Shoot Planetary Imager IV, Celestron Skymaster 15x70 binoculars

 

  • Member since
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Posted by pastorg on Wednesday, October 17, 2012 10:22 PM

+2 for Orion!  Large, bright constellation.  Many DSO's to observe along with double and multiple stars.

Zhumell Z12 Dob, Celestron Omni XLT 102mm refractor on CG-4 Mount,  Meade AZ70 refractor, Celestron Ultima 2X Barlow 1.25, Telrad with 4 3/8 Riser, Zhumell Skyglow Filter, Zhumell OIII Filter, Baader UHC-S Filter, Meade ND96 Moon Filter, Baader Planetarium Hyperion 21mm, 13mm, 8mm and 5mm eyepieces, Meade 9mm and 25mm Plossls, Zhumell 9mm Plossl and 2 inch 30mm SWA,  6mm Orion Expanse and Pentax 10 x 50 PCF WP ll Binos

  • Member since
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  • From: SE MA, U.S.A.
Posted by mr Q on Wednesday, October 17, 2012 11:15 PM

   For me it's Sagittarius also, partly because since my early childhood it was drilled into my brain as being my astrolo...sorry, just can't say that infamous word, and mostly because of its appearance in the nice summer skies with all its globulars, open clusters, nebulae and of course the constellation where we look to view the center of our galaxy. What more could one ask for?

Mead DS-10 (10" newt)

10x50 Focal Bino

10x70 Orion Bino

What goes around, comes around, eventually.Wink

  • Member since
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Posted by StarFarmer on Thursday, October 18, 2012 9:32 AM

It is hard to choose just one but I'll go with Sagittarius also.  Last night I set out with DSLR, zoom, and tripod to capture the Moon, Mars, and Mercury.  I got some pretty good pics of the Moon, Mars, and Antares but Mercury was still in too much of the Sun's glow.  I will post a few of those pics later in a different post.  It was a beautifully dark night and I thought I would go to Sagittarius to say maybe my last goodbye for the season before I start spending my time on the new winter constellations.  It was breathtaking.

The bright star on the bottom is the "Tea Pot" cap star (Kaus Borealis).  Going up and to the left (or north and to the east) is 25 Sgr(white), HIP90953 (blue)  and the red star 24 Sgr.  I always like to see the contrast of stars' colors even if I adjusted that contrast and brightness some on the computer. A 5 second, unguided exposure doesn't hurt bringing out those faint stars either.  This gives me an idea of the temperature differences amongst them.  Finally, if you travel a bit more to the upper left, you may see the globular M22.  There are sooooo many DSO's in this area.

 

**********************************************************************************************************

 Member since the spring of 2009.  Born 1958.  NW OK.  LX-200 EMC Classic (10") 

Explore Scientific 127mm APO Triplet.  Celestron CGEM mount available for both.

  • Member since
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Posted by leo731 on Thursday, October 18, 2012 3:22 PM

Orion in the Winter and Sagittarius in Summer are quite flashy and filled with great telescopic objects but my favorite constellation remains Leo.  The Lion begins to dominate the skies in the late Winter and is the harbinger of Spring.  It looks very much like what it is supposed to be and rides high up in the sky making it easy to see even in light polluted skies.  Leo contains many interesting double stars and galaxies as well as being the radiant point for a great meteor shower.

Of course, there couldn't possibly be any other reason, Smile

Leo

A nebula in the eyepiece is worth two in the Atlas.

  • Member since
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Posted by Aratus on Friday, October 19, 2012 11:25 AM

I have always had an affection for Taurus the Bull.    The second constellation I ever recognised, it looks very much like the object it is supposed to represent.    Aldebaren is a gorgeous orange star with a pretty unique hue.   Theta Tauri is a fascinating double star even to the naked eye.   Through binoculars or a small telescope it is easy to see that one is white and the other a creamy colour.

Through binoculars the 'V' shaped Hyades is a wealth of detail.     Between the horns there are the open clusters of NGC1746 and NGC1747.  NGC1747 is especially attractive with the 2 orangey stars just below it in contrast to the fine grey/whiteness of the cluster itself.

The big challenge in Taurus is the Crab Nebula (M1).   I searched for this over many decades but only succeed with my 8 inch SCT about 8 years ago.  

Taurus attracts planetary visitors regularly.   In my time Saturn has visited it twice and Jupiter every 12 years or so.    Mars enters the Hyades too a few times, and then the bull opens its other red eye !!    August 1975 and September 1990 are noted in my log.    (Has it happened since?)

Aratus

Location:  North West Devon, UK

-------------------------------------------------

Celestron Nexstar8i (8" SCT).

Celestron Skymaster binoculars 15x70

Other:0.63 & 0.33 correctors. X2 & X4 barlow.

Imagers: Meade DSI & Celestron NexImage.  Canon EOS 550D

 

 

  • Member since
    July, 2011
Posted by Darren in Tacoma on Friday, October 19, 2012 9:40 PM

If you want to see a constellation that resembles its name, it's hard to beat delphinus, the dolphin.

There isn't a lot going on in this little patch of sky, but every time I spot it, it brings a smile to my face. I'm only able to see it from a dark site, which makes it a bit more special to me.

I also enjoy picking through Cygnus.

  • Member since
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  • From: SE MA, U.S.A.
Posted by mr Q on Saturday, October 20, 2012 12:45 AM

  Star Farmer - Nice picture! And yes, the globular is easily seen and compliments the composition. Well done!

  Leo - Gee, I can't imagine what other reason you like Leo that muchSmile, Wink & Grin

  Darren -  I love Delphinus  for the same reason - like a dolphin leaping out of the water Cool

Mead DS-10 (10" newt)

10x50 Focal Bino

10x70 Orion Bino

What goes around, comes around, eventually.Wink

  • Member since
    March, 2009
Posted by Matroskin on Sunday, October 21, 2012 12:41 AM

Sagittarius - it is great, but low above a horizon here. Orion - it is marvelous, but it is -20 celsius degrees here when Orion dominates in the sky. So I vote for Cassiopeia (in Tolkien's legendarium it is called Vilvarin - "a butterfly"). It is not big constellation but full of stars and my favorite open clusters - like M103 or M52 or NGC663 or NGC457 and the Double Cluster is nearby, too.

200-mm Meade LT-8 SC, 90-mm Levenhuk Strike 90 Plus, 10 x 50 binoculars, Canon EOS 600D

Saratov, Russian Federation, 51d30m N 46d02m E

  • Member since
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Posted by Taurus12 on Sunday, October 28, 2012 8:06 AM

I am in So. Cal. and Orion is my favorite constellation. Taurus and Gemini are right next to Orion I check them out too. So many facinating objects in the sky.

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  • From: PA, USA, Earth Moderator
Posted by DaveMitsky on Sunday, October 28, 2012 1:15 PM

My overall favorite is Sagittarius, which contains a wealth of deep-sky objects and more Messier objects than any other constellation.  B86, M8, M17, M20, M22, M23, M24, M55, NGC 6440 and nearby NGC 6445, NGC 6818, and NGC 6822 are some of my favorite DSOs found within the Archer's borders.

www.dibonsmith.com/sgr_con.htm

www.astronomical.org/.../sgr.html

My second favorite summer constellation is Cygnus.

www.dibonsmith.com/cyg_con.htm

www.astronomical.org/.../cyg.html

My favorite winter constellation, and second overall, is Orion.

www.dibonsmith.com/ori_con.htm

www.astronomical.org/.../ori.html

It's difficult to choose a second-place winter constellation from among Canis Major, Gemini, and Taurus.

My favorite spring constellation is Virgo, with Leo in second-place.  

http://www.dibonsmith.com/vir_con.htm

http://www.astronomical.org/constellations/vir.html

http://www.dibonsmith.com/leo_con.htm

http://www.astronomical.org/constellations/leo.html

Pegasus and Andromeda, in that order, are my favorites when autumn arrives.

http://www.dibonsmith.com/peg_con.htm

http://www.astronomical.org/constellations/peg.html

http://www.dibonsmith.com/and_con.htm

http://www.astronomical.org/constellations/and.html

As far as southern hemisphere constellations are concerned, it's a toss-up between Carina and Centaurus.

www.dibonsmith.com/car_con.htm

www.astronomical.org/.../car.html

www.dibonsmith.com/cen_con.htm

www.astronomical.org/.../cen.html

Dave Mitsky

Sic itur ad astra!

Chance favors the prepared mind.

A man is a small thing, and the night is very large and full of wonders.

  • Member since
    July, 2011
Posted by Darren in Tacoma on Sunday, October 28, 2012 6:36 PM

Dave, are you saying that you have narrowed it down to just 12 favorites?

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  • From: PA, USA, Earth Moderator
Posted by DaveMitsky on Monday, October 29, 2012 12:18 AM

As I said in the first sentence of my post, Sagittarius is my overall favorite.  It was the only constellation about which I mentioned specific objects.  Consider the others as runners-up.

Dave Mitsky

Sic itur ad astra!

Chance favors the prepared mind.

A man is a small thing, and the night is very large and full of wonders.

  • Member since
    November, 2009
Posted by Poppa Chris on Monday, October 29, 2012 11:27 AM

Sagittarius is my zodiacal birth sign.  ALthough Orion is my favorite, Sagittarius is runner up.

Keep your head down, Dave.  Don't let "Sandy" mess with you too badly.

---Poppa Chris---

Denham Springs, Louisiana USA

"Second star to the right - Then straight on until morning!" - Peter Pan

Celestron CPC1100GPS (XLT) - 279mm aperature, 2800mm Focal length. (f10) Celestron Ultima LX (70deg AFOV) Eyepieces 32mm thru 5mm, Canon EOS Rebel T2i DSLR, Backyard EOS imaging software, Orion Star Shoot Planetary Imager IV, Celestron Skymaster 15x70 binoculars

 

  • Member since
    July, 2011
Posted by Darren in Tacoma on Monday, October 29, 2012 9:22 PM

DaveMitsky

As I said in the first sentence of my post, Sagittarius is my overall favorite.  It was the only constellation about which I mentioned specific objects.  Consider the others as runners-up.

Dave Mitsky

I was just joshin' ya a bit.

I was a little surprised that you included some southern constellations. 

Moderator
  • Member since
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  • From: PA, USA, Earth Moderator
Posted by DaveMitsky on Monday, October 29, 2012 9:45 PM

I included Carina and Centaurus since I've observed the southern hemisphere sky from south of the equator.

Dave Mitsky

Sic itur ad astra!

Chance favors the prepared mind.

A man is a small thing, and the night is very large and full of wonders.

M44
  • Member since
    January, 2010
Posted by M44 on Saturday, November 10, 2012 7:54 AM

Sagittarius is rather difficult from the UK and we can't see all of it. I like Orion (as snapped recently from Ghana): philippugh.atwebpages.com/TestSeq2.html

How can I be at one with the universe when we don't know what 96% of it actually is?

http://philippugh.comlu.com/index.html

 

  • Member since
    October, 2007
Posted by Aratus on Monday, November 12, 2012 8:50 AM

The very first constellation I saw was Ursa Major, or at least the 7 stars of 'The Plough'.   I was 9 years old, and I had memorised the pattern of stars from a book, and then I went outside at the end of November, about 6pm.   It was low down, right in front of me, and the 'right way up'.   I was amazed that I saw it so easily, although I recall thinking it was a bit larger than I expected.

I was very fortunate that I chose that time, and that time of the year, to make my initial experiments in astronomy.   If I had done it in the Spring, my experience might have been very different.

Anyhow, those 7 bright stars have always had a special place - like a first love Star .

Aratus

Location:  North West Devon, UK

-------------------------------------------------

Celestron Nexstar8i (8" SCT).

Celestron Skymaster binoculars 15x70

Other:0.63 & 0.33 correctors. X2 & X4 barlow.

Imagers: Meade DSI & Celestron NexImage.  Canon EOS 550D

 

 

  • Member since
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Posted by WinterSolstice on Monday, November 12, 2012 11:37 AM

I like Cassiopeia, because it points to my second-favorite galaxy (after the Milky Way), Andromeda.  But then again, Orion is so brilliant and obvious and welcome, and I'm always sad at the end of winter to see him go.  Can I also put in a good word for the Southern Cross, simply because I got to see it in person?Smile

  • Member since
    December, 2012
Posted by Zak Hepler on Wednesday, December 05, 2012 3:40 PM

Living in Alaska, we have have some beautiful clear nights. I can easily view many northern hemisphere constellations. My favorite constellation would be Orion. Orion is easily recognizable and is full of many features.

  • Member since
    April, 2011
Posted by AstroMissy on Monday, January 07, 2013 10:25 PM

Oh it's so hard to pick because i have a number of favorite objects I enjoy in different constellations, but my favorite has to be the mighty Hercules because I saw my first globular cluster, M13, on my first star party when I joined my astronomy club. Looking through my first 16 inch telescope at the club observatory I could not believe how many stars I was seeing, the beauty was unbelievable. Later back home under light pollution I struggled to locate him so I made it my mission to find him and I eventually did.

Live, Laugh, Love

  • Member since
    April, 2013
Posted by vaanam nokki on Thursday, April 04, 2013 2:45 AM

I LIKE CASSIOPIA CONSTELLATION. ITS SHAPE IT THE LINE DRAWN BISECTING THE ANGLE MEETS THE POLE STAR. KASHYAPI IS THE NAME OF A SAGE IN INDIA, IT IS RELATED TO CASSIOPIA. I ALSO LIKE BIG BEAR/ SAPTARISHI. IT CONTAINS 7+1 STARS THE NAMES OF INDIAN SAGES.

HITHES.P,

PATHIYIL MANA,

MEZHATHUR,

PALAKKAD,

KERALA,

INDIA - 679534

  • Member since
    June, 2013
Posted by Tam_003 on Sunday, June 02, 2013 1:34 PM

I have to agree.... Orion for the win :) There's just so much to see in the Orion constellation :D

  • Member since
    December, 2013
  • From: Asheville, North Carolina
Posted by Quiet_Warrior on Monday, December 09, 2013 3:32 PM

My favorite one is the Ursa major.  I remeber being six years old and my father pointing toward the night sky and showing me how to find it.  That is what sparked my interest in the stars.  Daddy is gone now but everytime I see that constellation, I think of him patiently guiding me to see it.

 

  • Member since
    January, 2014
Posted by dethfire on Wednesday, January 15, 2014 8:44 AM

I always enjoy Ursa Major

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