Twinkling star below Orion's Belt

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  • Member since
    September, 2009
Twinkling star below Orion's Belt
Posted by kvsyr on Wednesday, September 02, 2009 5:17 AM

At 5am this morning I noticed a twinkling star below Orion's belt.  Upon investigating further with my telescope, I was amazed to see an explosion of colors (reds, greens and yellows) that was emanating from whatever I was looking at.

I'm new at this, so I have no clue what it was.  I'm located in upstate NY and the light was coming from approx the same location where Jupiter was last night about 8pm.

 Does anyone know what this was?

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Posted by zachsdad on Wednesday, September 02, 2009 8:11 AM

If you drew a line connecting the three stars in Orion's Belt and then extended that line would it reach the star you are talking about?  If so, then the star in question is Sirius.  The color effects you describe would be due to atmospheric prismatic dispersion.

Terry's Law of Cosmology: "Light travels faster than sound. That's why some people appear bright until you hear them speak."

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10" Orion Skyquest Classic dob

 120mm Orion ST achromat

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Posted by Kevin Bozard on Wednesday, September 02, 2009 8:50 AM

 Here's some visual assistance for you kvsyr. The star Zachsdad is referring to is indicated in the image below.

 


"Good friends are like stars, you don't always see them, but you know they're always there."

kevinbozard.com

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  • Member since
    September, 2009
Posted by kvsyr on Wednesday, September 02, 2009 10:15 AM

Thanks for taking the time to send this.

 I can't wait to view this again tomorrow.  Did anyone else notice this pheonomena?

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    January, 2004
Posted by tkerr on Wednesday, September 02, 2009 1:11 PM
If you like that one, just wait until you notice Venus.

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  • Member since
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Posted by leo731 on Wednesday, September 02, 2009 2:21 PM

Before my world turned into a blackened soot and ash filled hell I noticed Sirius low in the predawn sky to the southeast.  It was madly twinkling away with a full palette of vivid colours.  Still, as was mentioned it can't compare with the beautiful Venus to the northeast which still shines down with its heavenly light, even though it be more yellow than white due to smoke and haze.

L

A nebula in the eyepiece is worth two in the Atlas.

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    September, 2009
Posted by LadyFiddler on Wednesday, September 23, 2009 8:19 AM

 I'm absolutely new!  I saw two twinklling stars in the south and east sky this morning.  One was bigger than the other, the smallest one was yellowish.  Can you tell I'm a newbie?  *hahaha*

 

Anyway, I Googled "twinkling morning star" and this board was 4th on the listing.  Amazing!  I found out that Sirius was the brightest and Venus was the yellow twinkling star (planet).

 

Thank you leo731 and zachsdad.  

 

LadyFiddler (female fiddle player)

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Posted by zachsdad on Wednesday, September 23, 2009 8:24 AM

Glad to help.

LadyFiddler

LadyFiddler (female fiddle player)

Bluegrass?  Country?  Celtic?

Terry's Law of Cosmology: "Light travels faster than sound. That's why some people appear bright until you hear them speak."

18" Obsession Classic dob #1665

10" Orion Skyquest Classic dob

 120mm Orion ST achromat

15 X 70 celestron Skymaster binoculars

  • Member since
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Posted by LadyFiddler on Wednesday, September 23, 2009 8:30 AM

 Music style:  I call it 'front porch' music.  It's a mix of old time gospel, country swing, a little jazz and some blues.  Basically, anything that the other musicians want to play.  I enjoy "jamming" instead of performing.  Jamming lets the musicians enjoy the fun.  Performing is work.  *haha*

 

 

  • Member since
    October, 2013
Posted by goodname on Saturday, October 12, 2013 5:09 PM

zachsdad

If you drew a line connecting the three stars in Orion's Belt and then extended that line would it reach the star you are talking about?  If so, then the star in question is Sirius.  The color effects you describe would be due to atmospheric prismatic dispersion.

 

been there, done that are you Sirius??

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