Professor Steven Hawking

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  • Member since
    February, 2014
Professor Steven Hawking
Posted by Architeuthis on Sunday, February 23, 2014 9:44 AM

I have often wondered, just how important was/is the work of Steven Hawking to astro-physics? He is a household name, yes, but how much is that due to his research, theories and plain hard science work? I fully sympathize with his medical condition and it seriously challenges ones faith in God when we ask, 'why did it have to happen to him?'

He is so easy to recognize and has become iconic with his motorized chair, paralyzed body and electronic voice-box that speaks of concepts that most people struggle to understand, but lets judge the man by his work.

 

Put simply: Would Steven Hawking be as famous as he is--based on his work-- if he wasn't stricken with a terrible condition which media companies seem eager to highlight, to show the triumph of his spirit?

Personally, as he is a fellow Englishman, I hope he does live up to the hype. But I remember watching a documentary where one of his major theories on black holes turned out to be erroneous. Can anybody give me their opinion on this subject? Does he merit his fame in science?

Architeuthis

 

  • Member since
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Posted by Primordial on Sunday, February 23, 2014 10:25 AM

Architeuthis : Oft' the good men do is intered in their bones, so let it be so, with Mr. Stephen Hawking. I think the good which comes from men and women often become recognizable only after decades of study. However he has brought the possibility of a new state of matter to our attention. Just my opinion. hope I did not distroy mr. Shakespeer's works.

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  • From: Eastern SD.
Posted by johnjohnson on Sunday, February 23, 2014 11:34 AM

When trapped in one's own head, what can a person do but think! Now if he had not been afficted to mental internment, would not his thoughts have been down a different path, more to the common every day necessities of living a normal life, not imagining the cerebral concepts of the universe. Imagine paralyized and trapped in your own mind but able to wander the unknown universe untethered. Is he really hadicapped or is it us?

JJ

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Posted by anndromeda on Sunday, February 23, 2014 10:40 PM

Good point...

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Posted by DaveMitsky on Monday, February 24, 2014 2:38 AM

There is little doubt that Stephen Hawking is one of the premiere physicists of the past 40 years.  Equating his fame to his medical condition is erroneous in the extreme.  

Some of Hawking's awards include the Eddington Medal (1975), the Albert Einstein Medal (1979), the Wolf Prize in Physics (1988), the Royal Society's Copley Medal (2006), and the Presidential Medal of Freedom (2009).  He has also been awarded the Adams Prize, the Gold Medal of the Royal Astronomical Society, the Dannie Heineman Prize for Mathematical Physics, the Hughes Medal, the Fonseca Prize, the Special Fundamental Physics Prize, the Prince of Asturias Award for Concord, and the Dirac Medal of the Institute of Physics but not the Nobel Prize. Hawking was named a fellow of the Royal Society at the young age of 32.

http://www.biography.com/people/stephen-hawking-9331710?page=1

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=lr6XbwSOBxM

Dave Mitsky

Sic itur ad astra!

Chance favors the prepared mind.

A man is a small thing, and the night is very large and full of wonders.

  • Member since
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Posted by Architeuthis on Tuesday, February 25, 2014 5:13 AM
Okay, I see he's quite prestigious, but how profound? Albert Einstein, being the first see beyond and actually realize, quite matter-of-factly, that space-time is curved...? That's pretty much the kind of intuitiveness I'm thinking of. Is Hawking in that league?
  • Member since
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Posted by Primordial on Tuesday, February 25, 2014 8:09 AM

Architeuthis :  You ask, quote, " Okay, I see he's quite prestigious, but how profound? Albert Einstein, being the first see beyond and actually realize, quite matter-of-factly, that space-time is curved...? That's pretty much the kind of intuitiveness I'm thinking of. Is Hawking in that league? " , yes, I think Mr. Hawking, will fill the bill. I most likely will not live to see this assessment of mr. Hawking fimalized as he is still very active, but he is as many whom have come before him in science, as a blind finding his way and surprized at his own accomplishments. Mr. Einstein is in my opinion also the greatest, but the work any man does, is only as great, as he is to others. And only they can judge in their own way.

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