Russian cosmonauts and Olympic torch

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  • Member since
    April, 2012
  • From: North Carolina east coast USA
Russian cosmonauts and Olympic torch
Posted by stepping beyond on Saturday, November 09, 2013 7:48 AM

At 9am Olympic torch will be viewed on space.com 20 min. display of torch walk in space sparking the start to the winter Olympics in Russia . How cool is that?

  • Member since
    November, 2009
Posted by Poppa Chris on Saturday, November 09, 2013 9:00 AM

Pretty cool.  I assume the torch will not be lit during that walk (wink-wink)

---Poppa Chris---

Denham Springs, Louisiana USA

"Second star to the right - Then straight on until morning!" - Peter Pan

Celestron CPC1100GPS (XLT) - 279mm aperature, 2800mm Focal length. (f10) Celestron Ultima LX (70deg AFOV) Eyepieces 32mm thru 5mm, Canon EOS Rebel T2i DSLR, Backyard EOS imaging software, Orion Star Shoot Planetary Imager IV, Celestron Skymaster 15x70 binoculars

 

  • Member since
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Posted by Centaur on Saturday, November 09, 2013 10:25 AM

It's interesting that we occasionally still see the term cosmonaut. That's a relic of the Cold War when the US government attempted to differentiate American astronauts from those of the Soviet Union. I suggest that in English we use only the term astronaut in appication to voyagers into space from any nation. 

For astronomical graphics, including monthly wallpaper calendar, visit:

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  • Member since
    October, 2007
Posted by Aratus on Saturday, November 09, 2013 3:39 PM

It is unfortunate that the USA, Russia, and China have chosen to use 3 different words for spacefarers launched by their countries.   Astronaut, Cosmonaut and Taikonaut.     However Helen Sharman the first UK spacefarer was always called 'Astronaut' in the UK even though she was part of a Russian mission. 

France in its usual stubborness uses the term 'Spationaut', but I don't think anyone else uses it.  Big Smile 

Aratus

Location:  North West Devon, UK

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  • Member since
    April, 2012
  • From: North Carolina east coast USA
Posted by stepping beyond on Saturday, November 09, 2013 4:53 PM

I think they all should be called Astronuts, I would like to be called an Astronut , Aratus what do you think about that.

  • Member since
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Posted by leo731 on Saturday, November 09, 2013 7:28 PM

Aratus

France in its usual stubborness uses the term 'Spationaut', but I don't think anyone else uses it.  Big Smile 

 

I should have known but I was not aware of the French designation.  Bow

As to the olympic torch I saw that this morning.  It was live on our local news channel and they were laughing at the guy who wondered if it was lit! 

A nebula in the eyepiece is worth two in the Atlas.

  • Member since
    November, 2012
Posted by MooseMan01 on Saturday, November 09, 2013 9:19 PM

If they went to Uranus, they should be called Uranuts.

  • Member since
    April, 2012
  • From: North Carolina east coast USA
Posted by stepping beyond on Sunday, November 10, 2013 3:41 PM

My thoughts exactly. everything ending in nuts.

  • Member since
    October, 2007
Posted by Aratus on Sunday, November 10, 2013 5:28 PM

"Astronut! !   Now that is ringing a bell with me.   Wasn't he a cartoon character?

EDIT:   Just looked it up, and my memory on this occasion held out

Amazingly a lot of people on the internet spell 'astronaut' as 'astronut'.   The 2 words are quite distinctive with a British accent, but it may be more difficult to distinguish them with a typical American accent.

British : Ast - Row - Nawt

American: Astra naht

Aratus

Location:  North West Devon, UK

-------------------------------------------------

Celestron Nexstar8i (8" SCT).

Celestron Skymaster binoculars 15x70

Other:0.63 & 0.33 correctors. X2 & X4 barlow.

Imagers: Meade DSI & Celestron NexImage.  Canon EOS 550D

 

 

  • Member since
    May, 2005
Posted by Centaur on Monday, November 11, 2013 12:13 AM

Aratus

British : Ast - Row - Nawt

American: Astra naht

Actually it's the same in British RP or Standard American English as spoken here in the Upper Midwest (outside of inner cities) and much of the Pacific Coast. Perhaps the "naht" is heard in the northeastern US. In German it is probably more like "nowt" (like the word "now").

For astronomical graphics, including monthly wallpaper calendar, visit:

www.CurtRenz.com/astronomical


  • Member since
    November, 2009
Posted by Poppa Chris on Monday, November 11, 2013 8:30 AM

We've had a good disussion on what we call Russian rocketmen, but what do the Russians actually call them?

---Poppa Chris---

Denham Springs, Louisiana USA

"Second star to the right - Then straight on until morning!" - Peter Pan

Celestron CPC1100GPS (XLT) - 279mm aperature, 2800mm Focal length. (f10) Celestron Ultima LX (70deg AFOV) Eyepieces 32mm thru 5mm, Canon EOS Rebel T2i DSLR, Backyard EOS imaging software, Orion Star Shoot Planetary Imager IV, Celestron Skymaster 15x70 binoculars

 

  • Member since
    October, 2007
Posted by Aratus on Monday, November 11, 2013 12:02 PM

Centaur

There are different pronunciations in both our countries.  I take the point.   The American accent I am most used to tends to be an provincial eastern accent.   'Astronaut' sounds very much like 'astronut'. 

If I remember correctly the green alien's name was shortened to 'Astro'.    His friend was called 'Oscar'.   It's all coming back to me now!   Was it really 40+ years ago?

Poppa Chris

We simply take the Russian word. ' космонавт ' which is 'Cosmonaut'   We didn't have to do that.   Cosmonaut is just derived from Greek - 'Universe Sailor'.    'Astronaut' is also Greek 'Star Sailor'.   Both are quite fanciful.    I seem to remember 'spaceman' was used quite a lot in the early days, which was a better description.   A bit too gender specific for today. Big Smile

Aratus

Location:  North West Devon, UK

-------------------------------------------------

Celestron Nexstar8i (8" SCT).

Celestron Skymaster binoculars 15x70

Other:0.63 & 0.33 correctors. X2 & X4 barlow.

Imagers: Meade DSI & Celestron NexImage.  Canon EOS 550D

 

 

  • Member since
    October, 2005
Posted by leo731 on Monday, November 11, 2013 2:16 PM

I believe the word spaceman was purposely rejected.  In Tom Wolfe's book "The Right Stuff" there was a lot of negative baggage with the word.  Spaceman was too close to the word Specimen and the movie had great fun with the German scientists saying the the one like the other with their accent.  Spaceman also was used quite a lot in Hollywood b-movies.  Perhaps most telling is the way humorist Jose Inglesias used the word in his spaceyman comedy routines of early 1960's. 

A nebula in the eyepiece is worth two in the Atlas.

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