Seriously, let's rename Uranus

5410 views
38 replies
1 rating 2 rating 3 rating 4 rating 5 rating
  • Member since
    October, 2013
Seriously, let's rename Uranus
Posted by siegmundm on Monday, October 21, 2013 4:10 PM

Has it occured to you that Uranus is the "forbidden planet"? No missions planned, even exoplanets in this mass range are called "neptunes" instead. With this kind of name it is no wonder that it cannot attract any serious discussion about congressional support etc. With Ariel as one of its moons, having a potential for Enceladus-like activity and maybe an underground ocean etc., the Uranian system could be a great target and a great challenge for future spacecraft with improved propulsion etc. But the name... It was not immediately called that way, for some time it has even been referred to by the discoverer's name (Herschel). So why not revert to Herschel or some other name? What do you think?

Greetings from Germany.

  • Member since
    November, 2009
Posted by Poppa Chris on Monday, October 21, 2013 8:46 PM

As with all of the planets except Earth, Uranus is named for a mythological Roman god.  Therefore, "Herschel" would not fit the mold very well.  There are other candidate names possible.  Why not research the names of the gods a little and propose one you think proper.  Bacchus perhaps?  As for me, Uranus works just fine.  I got past sophmoric humor many years ago.

---Poppa Chris---

Denham Springs, Louisiana USA

"Second star to the right - Then straight on until morning!" - Peter Pan

Celestron CPC1100GPS (XLT) - 279mm aperature, 2800mm Focal length. (f10) Celestron Ultima LX (70deg AFOV) Eyepieces 32mm thru 5mm, Canon EOS Rebel T2i DSLR, Backyard EOS imaging software, Orion Star Shoot Planetary Imager IV, Celestron Skymaster 15x70 binoculars

 

  • Member since
    December, 2005
Posted by Oliver Tunnah on Tuesday, October 22, 2013 8:31 AM

Uranus works for me too. It's one of those cases where we have to let off the mispronounciation. And if someone can't say it mispronounciation or not without laughing then there's no point trying to have a serious astronomical discussion with them.

My surname gets mispronounced all the time. No matter how frustrated I feel, I ain't gunna change it.

  • Member since
    October, 2007
Posted by Aratus on Tuesday, October 22, 2013 12:13 PM

"Uranus" was always a bit of a strange choice for a planet.   The other planets are the names of Roman gods, but 'Uranus' is Greek.   It should really have been 'Caelus', the Roman equivalent.   Even then it was a puzzling choice since Uranus was a personification of the sky as a whole from which other gods originated.  He doesn't really have the same kind of status of the other deities. 

At the time I might have gone for 'Ceres' (growing), as he logically follows Saturn.(sowing)

 

Aratus

Location:  North West Devon, UK

-------------------------------------------------

Celestron Nexstar8i (8" SCT).

Celestron Skymaster binoculars 15x70

Other:0.63 & 0.33 correctors. X2 & X4 barlow.

Imagers: Meade DSI & Celestron NexImage.  Canon EOS 550D

 

 

  • Member since
    November, 2009
Posted by Poppa Chris on Tuesday, October 22, 2013 1:38 PM

I'm sticking with Bacchus, the "party hearty" god... Mischief

 

---Poppa Chris---

Denham Springs, Louisiana USA

"Second star to the right - Then straight on until morning!" - Peter Pan

Celestron CPC1100GPS (XLT) - 279mm aperature, 2800mm Focal length. (f10) Celestron Ultima LX (70deg AFOV) Eyepieces 32mm thru 5mm, Canon EOS Rebel T2i DSLR, Backyard EOS imaging software, Orion Star Shoot Planetary Imager IV, Celestron Skymaster 15x70 binoculars

 

  • Member since
    October, 2005
Posted by leo731 on Tuesday, October 22, 2013 2:21 PM

Uranus is just fine.  Sure it brings out a few snickers at outreach parties but really is that so bad?  It makes for a mood lightener as it reminds us not to take ourselves too seriously.  I doubt the name has anything to do with the lack of future missions.  Voyager was able to go there thanks to a serendipitous alignment of the planets decades ago that allowed us to reach Neptune and Uranus efficiently.  It would be very difficult and time consuming to get there now.  We often forget that these gas giants are very, very far away.

 

L

A nebula in the eyepiece is worth two in the Atlas.

  • Member since
    October, 2007
Posted by Aratus on Tuesday, October 22, 2013 3:06 PM

Trust you to think of that name, Poppa Chris Smile   Bacchus wasn't what I would call a real Roman god.   A lot of Romans wouldn't have thought he had any reality.  He was a good excuse for unlimited chaos and licenciousness though.     I still recall the fun I had in my first manly toga Devil Big Smile

Perhaps you would care to name his satellites !!!  Mischief

Aratus

Location:  North West Devon, UK

-------------------------------------------------

Celestron Nexstar8i (8" SCT).

Celestron Skymaster binoculars 15x70

Other:0.63 & 0.33 correctors. X2 & X4 barlow.

Imagers: Meade DSI & Celestron NexImage.  Canon EOS 550D

 

 

  • Member since
    November, 2009
Posted by Poppa Chris on Tuesday, October 22, 2013 4:11 PM

Name the moons? All 27 of them?  Or just the 5 "biggies"?

How about "Merlot", "Chianti", "Syrah", "Cabernet" and that rascal girl "Tequila"?  Wink

Or we could just go with thier real names - Miranda, Ariel, Umbriel, Titania, and Oberon.

 

---Poppa Chris---

Denham Springs, Louisiana USA

"Second star to the right - Then straight on until morning!" - Peter Pan

Celestron CPC1100GPS (XLT) - 279mm aperature, 2800mm Focal length. (f10) Celestron Ultima LX (70deg AFOV) Eyepieces 32mm thru 5mm, Canon EOS Rebel T2i DSLR, Backyard EOS imaging software, Orion Star Shoot Planetary Imager IV, Celestron Skymaster 15x70 binoculars

 

  • Member since
    October, 2007
Posted by Aratus on Tuesday, October 22, 2013 5:01 PM

No - that seems appropriate!Big Smile

Before we get accused of sending this thread where is shouldn't be sent . . . I think 'Terminus' would have been a better name for the planet - using a name that has not been used since.  Terminus was the god who watched over the boundaries or limits.    The 5 major satellites could be called, Finis, Depono, Ultima, Limita and Butina !

Then they would have discovered another planet (Neptune) and wish they hadn't !!  Big Smile

 

Aratus

Location:  North West Devon, UK

-------------------------------------------------

Celestron Nexstar8i (8" SCT).

Celestron Skymaster binoculars 15x70

Other:0.63 & 0.33 correctors. X2 & X4 barlow.

Imagers: Meade DSI & Celestron NexImage.  Canon EOS 550D

 

 

  • Member since
    November, 2012
Posted by MooseMan01 on Tuesday, October 22, 2013 10:10 PM

Seem to recall it originally was the Georgian planet, so named by William Herschel after King George. Thankfully it was later changed. The actual Greek name is more like "Oronos".

No need to change it. Next thing we'll be renaming the moon as well!

Moderator
  • Member since
    July, 2001
  • From: PA, USA, Earth Moderator
Posted by DaveMitsky on Tuesday, October 22, 2013 11:36 PM

The spelling is Ouranos, from the ancient Greek word Οὐρανός.

http://www.theoi.com/Protogenos/Ouranos.html

William Herschel wanted to name his discovery the Georgium Sidus (the Georgian "Planet").  Johann Elert Bode suggested the name Uranus.

http://starchild.gsfc.nasa.gov/docs/StarChild/questions/question42.html

http://messier.seds.org/xtra/Bios/bode.html

Dave Mitsky

Sic itur ad astra!

Chance favors the prepared mind.

A man is a small thing, and the night is very large and full of wonders.

  • Member since
    October, 2007
Posted by Aratus on Wednesday, October 23, 2013 5:11 AM

MooseMan01

Seem to recall it originally was the Georgian planet, so named by William Herschel after King George. Thankfully it was later changed. The actual Greek name is more like "Oronos".

No need to change it. Next thing we'll be renaming the moon as well!

 

 
I think the thread is a bit of a 'thought fantasy' rather than a serious suggestion. (Despite the title!)  It isn't going to be changed anyway.   Herschel was encouraged to name the planet by Maskelyne, and came up with 'Georgium Sidus', which is Latin for 'George's Star' referring to George III, his patron.   Not a name guarenteed to win favour internationally!   
 
'Uranus' is the Latinised form of the Greek god, 'Ouranos'.    It was chosen because Saturn (Greek - Cronos) was an offspring of Ouranos.  
 
However, as I hinted earlier 'Ouranos' was the 'father' of dozens of Greek gods of which Cronos was just one.   Ouranos basically represents the sky, and wasn't really considered a god as such.  He originally was more of product of the universe, as is the Earth and the air.    Culturally, I think it was a bad choice.
 
Perhaps we should have had another female planet.   How about Proserpina?    The greenish hue of the planet would have fitted her 'spring foliage'.

Aratus

Location:  North West Devon, UK

-------------------------------------------------

Celestron Nexstar8i (8" SCT).

Celestron Skymaster binoculars 15x70

Other:0.63 & 0.33 correctors. X2 & X4 barlow.

Imagers: Meade DSI & Celestron NexImage.  Canon EOS 550D

 

 

  • Member since
    October, 2005
Posted by leo731 on Wednesday, October 23, 2013 1:37 PM

This is just a thought but considering that the present solar system dwarf planet Pluto has been demoted why not re-name Uranus as Pluto?   That way those who love the idea that the last planet out from the sun be named after the god of the underworld would be happy as Pluto would regain his equal footing with the other planets while we can rename that dwarf planet Thorin Oakenshield or something.

Smile, Wink & Grin

L

A nebula in the eyepiece is worth two in the Atlas.

  • Member since
    October, 2007
Posted by Aratus on Thursday, October 24, 2013 11:48 AM

That would set the cat amongst the pigeons !

Why not 'Elvira' since you have transformed into her visage?  Big Smile

 

Aratus

Location:  North West Devon, UK

-------------------------------------------------

Celestron Nexstar8i (8" SCT).

Celestron Skymaster binoculars 15x70

Other:0.63 & 0.33 correctors. X2 & X4 barlow.

Imagers: Meade DSI & Celestron NexImage.  Canon EOS 550D

 

 

  • Member since
    November, 2009
Posted by Poppa Chris on Thursday, October 24, 2013 4:51 PM

Elvira would be a great name for the planet if it had only two large moons rather than five.

---Poppa Chris---

Denham Springs, Louisiana USA

"Second star to the right - Then straight on until morning!" - Peter Pan

Celestron CPC1100GPS (XLT) - 279mm aperature, 2800mm Focal length. (f10) Celestron Ultima LX (70deg AFOV) Eyepieces 32mm thru 5mm, Canon EOS Rebel T2i DSLR, Backyard EOS imaging software, Orion Star Shoot Planetary Imager IV, Celestron Skymaster 15x70 binoculars

 

  • Member since
    October, 2007
Posted by Aratus on Friday, October 25, 2013 5:04 AM

Yes I started to wonder about naming the 5 satellites.   I quickly decided 'not to go there'!!!  

Aratus

Location:  North West Devon, UK

-------------------------------------------------

Celestron Nexstar8i (8" SCT).

Celestron Skymaster binoculars 15x70

Other:0.63 & 0.33 correctors. X2 & X4 barlow.

Imagers: Meade DSI & Celestron NexImage.  Canon EOS 550D

 

 

  • Member since
    October, 2005
Posted by leo731 on Friday, October 25, 2013 6:03 PM

Laugh

Actually if we did rename Pluto as Elvira I can think of five worthy names!   Vincent, Bela, Lon, Christopher, and Peter. 

Just think about it for a second or two.

L

A nebula in the eyepiece is worth two in the Atlas.

  • Member since
    October, 2007
Posted by Aratus on Saturday, October 26, 2013 7:48 AM

Names worthy of recognition!   It would certainly make me see Herschel's planet in a new light !

Aratus

Location:  North West Devon, UK

-------------------------------------------------

Celestron Nexstar8i (8" SCT).

Celestron Skymaster binoculars 15x70

Other:0.63 & 0.33 correctors. X2 & X4 barlow.

Imagers: Meade DSI & Celestron NexImage.  Canon EOS 550D

 

 

  • Member since
    October, 2013
Posted by siegmundm on Sunday, November 03, 2013 1:40 PM

Hi leo371, this is exactly what I've been thinking, we HAVE demoted Pluto even thought it had faced similar opposition initially. A rose would smell as sweet by any other name but when it comes to public outreach or advertising and things like that, a name can mean a lot. If it helps to get a dedicated spacecraft sent to Uranus, why not rename it and finally have it treated seriously as a planet?

Greetings from Germany.

  • Member since
    November, 2013
Posted by bwisok on Wednesday, November 06, 2013 4:56 PM

I totally agree, and would like to see a broad movement to rename Uranus. From other posts below, I really like Caelus (https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Caelus), which appears to be the Roman counterpart to the Greek god Uranus. My question is how does one actually officially change the name of the planet? Also how does one pronounce Caelus? It's just an odd touch of fate that this issue comes up and causes me to register on the Astronomy magazine site. My interest in astronomy has been of low priority for my whole life, but a week ago we published a phenomenal book on space flight and exploration/exploitation--I am the editor--called StarTram: The New Race to Space. So I'm looking forward to receiving the magazine and chatting with knowledgeable persons about a subject I'm sure I'll come to relish.

But, help me along with this 8th Planet renaming issue. I'm prepared to create a Website and will ask the knowledgeable expert who came  up with the Caelus rename suggestion--which I think is emminently logical--to write the lead article. The 8th Planet's (it is the 8th planet, isn't it?) name is just an annoyance that the community should have cleaned up long ago.

Brian Wright

  • Member since
    June, 2009
Posted by StarFarmer on Wednesday, November 06, 2013 9:23 PM

bwisok

The 8th Planet's (it is the 8th planet, isn't it?) name is just an annoyance that the community should have cleaned up long ago.

Brian Wright

Are you forgetting poor old Neptune?  I think he will be number 8 until the IAU demotes him too!

**********************************************************************************************************

 Member since the spring of 2009.  Born 1958.  NW OK.  LX-200 EMC Classic (10") 

Explore Scientific 127mm APO Triplet.  Celestron CGEM mount available for both.

  • Member since
    March, 2013
Posted by BrooksObs on Wednesday, November 06, 2013 10:22 PM

"I totally agree, and would like to see a broad movement to rename Uranus. From other posts below, I really like Caelus (https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Caelus), which appears to be the Roman counterpart to the Greek god Uranus. My question is how does one actually officially change the name of the planet?" - Brian Wright

 

Short answer is that you don't. The only organization with the power to alter the names of celestial bodies is the IAU and they would look upon the content of this entire thread as something generated by a host of truly fringe element folks! You simply don't change names of bodies established for centuries. I only hope that they would be kind enough to just laugh off the suggestion.

What is it about this site that generates bizarre ideas like changing the names of the planets, or the recently posed idea of totally revamping the magnitude system? I see nothing even remotely this strange and illogical on any of the other astronomical websites I peruse.

 

BrooksObs  

Moderator
  • Member since
    October, 2007
Posted by zachsdad on Thursday, November 07, 2013 7:23 AM

What is it about this site that generates bizarre ideas like changing the names of the planets, or the recently posed idea of totally revamping the magnitude system? I see nothing even remotely this strange and illogical on any of the other astronomical websites I peruse.

 

It's called "having fun". 

Terry's Law of Cosmology: "Light travels faster than sound. That's why some people appear bright until you hear them speak."

18" Obsession Classic dob #1665

10" Orion Skyquest Classic dob

 120mm Orion ST achromat

15 X 70 celestron Skymaster binoculars

  • Member since
    December, 2005
Posted by Oliver Tunnah on Thursday, November 07, 2013 7:35 AM

bwisok
Also how does one pronounce Caelus?

I would say Kay-lus.

But as others have pointed out there is no point to it. I never saw one anyway. As I've already said if people an't say it without laughing then they're not ready for a serious discussion about it.

  • Member since
    November, 2009
Posted by Poppa Chris on Thursday, November 07, 2013 8:59 AM

zachsdad

 

It's called "having fun". 

 

 

Kudos! Terry!  At least somebody recognizes this thread for what it truly is.  Big Smile

---Poppa Chris---

Denham Springs, Louisiana USA

"Second star to the right - Then straight on until morning!" - Peter Pan

Celestron CPC1100GPS (XLT) - 279mm aperature, 2800mm Focal length. (f10) Celestron Ultima LX (70deg AFOV) Eyepieces 32mm thru 5mm, Canon EOS Rebel T2i DSLR, Backyard EOS imaging software, Orion Star Shoot Planetary Imager IV, Celestron Skymaster 15x70 binoculars

 

  • Member since
    March, 2013
Posted by BrooksObs on Thursday, November 07, 2013 10:34 AM

Excuses me, kiddies, but one does not entitle a thread, "Seriously, let's rename Uranus" on what I had presumed was an at least semi-serious astronomical site and then presume others will take it as meant in jest...if it really ever was. When the thread first popped up, I indeed did read it through a couple of times looking for the eventual punch-line, or tongue-in-cheek reference, from the OP, but it never came. Nor was same suggested in several other seemingly serious posts. The same has been true in regard to the earlier Pluto name chance and magnitude system revamping threads, both senseless discussions. 

While I don't bother to consult this site very often because of its shortcomings, I had at least hoped that its make-up was not really of the caliber that now is obvious to me. I would only hope that the seriousness level of Astronomy magazine (which I likewise tend to shun) is not so obviously scientifically anemic and foolish. I'll be forewarned now and refrain from further posting.

BrooksObs

 

 

  • Member since
    October, 2005
Posted by leo731 on Thursday, November 07, 2013 1:15 PM

  My guess would be you found no humor in Gary Larson's The Far Side either.  We love Astronomy and we love letting our imagination soar once in awhile too.  There is of course no chance that Uranus will be renamed Pluto and it is not probable that it would be changed to something else but as an enjoyable lark it is certainly not anemic nor foolish. 

It is your decision whether to read these threads and to comment on them.  Your decisions as well as your conclusions are inconsequential to me. 

L

A nebula in the eyepiece is worth two in the Atlas.

  • Member since
    November, 2009
Posted by Poppa Chris on Thursday, November 07, 2013 2:01 PM

Bye-bye, Brooks!  Try to lighten up and have a little fun wherever it is you go...  Wink

 

I don't know about most people reading this thread, but I knew from the very beginning that it would not and never could seriously consider renaming Uranus.  As pointed out several times, we simply do not have that authority.  So if it is such a hopeless task it naturally falls under the heading of whimsical fantasy.  (AKA: a sense of humor.)

Personally, I've enjoyed the banter.

---Poppa Chris---

Denham Springs, Louisiana USA

"Second star to the right - Then straight on until morning!" - Peter Pan

Celestron CPC1100GPS (XLT) - 279mm aperature, 2800mm Focal length. (f10) Celestron Ultima LX (70deg AFOV) Eyepieces 32mm thru 5mm, Canon EOS Rebel T2i DSLR, Backyard EOS imaging software, Orion Star Shoot Planetary Imager IV, Celestron Skymaster 15x70 binoculars

 

  • Member since
    November, 2012
Posted by MooseMan01 on Thursday, November 07, 2013 8:06 PM

Enough of this! In all seriousness, we must do something because it's getting out of hand. We have to rename Uranus because the public finds its current name confusing. It isn't even spelled right. I propose that we rename it to Urectum. That way there's no doubt.

I'd be very happy to write the editorial for a web page in this regard.

  • Member since
    November, 2009
Posted by Poppa Chris on Thursday, November 07, 2013 10:24 PM

LaughLaughLaugh

---Poppa Chris---

Denham Springs, Louisiana USA

"Second star to the right - Then straight on until morning!" - Peter Pan

Celestron CPC1100GPS (XLT) - 279mm aperature, 2800mm Focal length. (f10) Celestron Ultima LX (70deg AFOV) Eyepieces 32mm thru 5mm, Canon EOS Rebel T2i DSLR, Backyard EOS imaging software, Orion Star Shoot Planetary Imager IV, Celestron Skymaster 15x70 binoculars

 

Join our Community!

Our community is FREE to join. To participate you must either login or register for an account.

ADVERTISEMENT

FREE EMAIL NEWSLETTER

Receive news, sky-event information, observing tips, and more from Astronomy's weekly email newsletter.

ADVERTISEMENT
ADVERTISEMENT
Find us on Facebook

Loading...