Anybody See LADEE Launch?

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  • Member since
    August, 2004
Anybody See LADEE Launch?
Posted by stars4life on Friday, September 06, 2013 11:11 PM

I forgot all about the launch because I was kind'a busy at the end of the night, but driving South on rt 73 at 11:30pm I saw that sucker anyway.

The exhaust flame was about an inch long at arms length. I quickly pulled into a parking lot and watched for another 10 seconds before it started to dim. Then after a few seconds it lit back up with the third stage, though not with much of a tail.

Because I saw the second stage go out I can put a distance on the viewing... about 150 miles, and I was at the transition of 15 deg to 20 deg elevation...

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  • From: PA, USA, Earth Moderator
Posted by DaveMitsky on Saturday, September 07, 2013 2:20 AM

I did indeed.

http://cs.astronomy.com/asy/observing/f/33/t/57270.aspx

By the way, photos and images that you don't own the rights to shouldn't be posted here.  

cs.astronomy.com/.../41089.aspx

Dave Mitsky

Sic itur ad astra!

Chance favors the prepared mind.

A man is a small thing, and the night is very large and full of wonders.

  • Member since
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  • From: North Carolina east coast USA
Posted by stepping beyond on Saturday, September 07, 2013 7:16 AM

I sure wanted to the sky was so clear and I was within the viewing perimeter, but, the pain started early and never subsided and sleep was inevitable with my medications.

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Posted by Primordial on Sunday, September 08, 2013 11:19 AM

DaveMitsky : What type of mission were they seaking to accomplish, with this shot?

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Posted by stars4life on Sunday, September 08, 2013 2:47 PM

Hey Primordial... it is a lunar orbiter that will be studying the very thin lunar atmosphere/dust. I was looking for an orbital height and couldn't find it so if anyone comes across that I would be interested in knowing what it will be. I'm thinking very low, or perhaps a slow decay until crashing onto the surface.

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Posted by Primordial on Sunday, September 08, 2013 3:22 PM

Stars4life : Thank you for the info. I would think there might be a very small amount of particles in a very thin layer captured during contact with solar debris over the ages. Affter all age and perserverance in an evolving solar system should yield some benefit. Just kidding.

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Posted by DaveMitsky on Sunday, September 08, 2013 5:49 PM

Primordial,

The following sites discuss the Lunar Atmosphere and Dust Environment Explorer and its Minotaur V launch vehicle:

www.orbital.com/.../index.shtml

www.nasa.gov/.../index.html

www.nasaspaceflight.com/.../orbitals-minotaur-v-launch-ladee-mission-moon

www.universetoday.com/.../nasas-ladee-lunar-probe-set-for-spectacular-science-and-september-night-launch-visible-to-millions-and-millions

LADEE will eventually make a hard landing on the Moon.

Dave Mitsky

Sic itur ad astra!

Chance favors the prepared mind.

A man is a small thing, and the night is very large and full of wonders.

  • Member since
    August, 2007
Posted by Primordial on Monday, September 09, 2013 12:07 PM

DaveMitsky : Thank you for the links, it's great stuff. I learned a new name for this type of  atmosphere " surface boundary exosphere " nice name. I am really interested in the LLCD experiment. Laser vs RF(? ) Must be something connected to polarization (?) Just think about it.

Tags: typos
  • Member since
    April, 2012
  • From: North Carolina east coast USA
Posted by stepping beyond on Tuesday, October 29, 2013 9:32 AM

 ANYONE ! what are your thoughts on the Enterprise mission to the Ladee mission , I'm really intrigued by the fact that there is evidence of space craft debris or it might be the remnants of a past civilization. I've many years involved in " lunar surface" observations and examination of anomalies and structures. I just don't understand why we just didn't put boots back on the moon, instead we just launched another drone mission.

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  • From: Texas
Posted by chipdatajeffB on Tuesday, October 29, 2013 11:47 AM

The major reasons are cost and coverage. Manned missions are expensive, and too short-lived to provide complete reconnaissance. With a manned landing, you basically have one shot at a single landing site, and a range of a few miles around that spot, at best. With a robotic spacecraft in low lunar orbit, the orbit and precession provide very nearly 100% coverage because the mission can last for many days.

The universe is not only stranger than we imagine, it's stranger than we CAN imagine. --- JBS Haldane

Come visit me at Comanche Springs Astronomy Campus (we're on Google Maps) in Texas.

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