Voyager leaving solar system or is it Voyager left solar system ?

2099 views
18 replies
1 rating 2 rating 3 rating 4 rating 5 rating
  • Member since
    April, 2012
  • From: North Carolina east coast USA
Voyager leaving solar system or is it Voyager left solar system ?
Posted by stepping beyond on Wednesday, August 21, 2013 4:48 PM

do any of the people on this forum really know the answer, does NASA  know? I would like to know.

Moderator
  • Member since
    July, 2001
  • From: PA, USA, Earth Moderator
Posted by DaveMitsky on Wednesday, August 21, 2013 5:00 PM

No one knows with absolute certainty.

www.gizmag.com/.../28719

www.npr.org/.../has-voyager-1-left-the-solar-system

Dave Mitsky

Sic itur ad astra!

Chance favors the prepared mind.

A man is a small thing, and the night is very large and full of wonders.

  • Member since
    August, 2013
Posted by adoni on Wednesday, August 21, 2013 5:10 PM

There's no agreement on where the solar system really ends last I heard. LOL

  • Member since
    April, 2012
  • From: North Carolina east coast USA
Posted by stepping beyond on Thursday, August 22, 2013 8:00 PM

Thanks for your reply, your right about where it ends.

  • Member since
    April, 2012
  • From: North Carolina east coast USA
Posted by stepping beyond on Thursday, August 22, 2013 8:04 PM

I understand , what I don't comprehend is how Scientist at NASA can say with certainty that because the amount of plasma being read outside of "Voyager" can tell where its not and that being our solar system.

  • Member since
    August, 2007
Posted by Primordial on Thursday, August 22, 2013 10:51 PM

DaveMitsky : Thank you for the links. This is just my opinion, but if the craft has obtained escape velocity and has reduced the number of obsticles with which its velocity may be changed, I would suggest it is leaving the solar system.  I am aware of the possibility of an encounter with the Oort cloud at approximately two light years. However by then the question may again, be of interest, but for now you could say it's on its way out.

Moderator
  • Member since
    July, 2001
  • From: PA, USA, Earth Moderator
Posted by DaveMitsky on Friday, August 23, 2013 4:09 PM

stepping beyond

I understand , what I don't comprehend is how Scientific communities can stir the pot  with that headline. To do it without proof to back it up.

 

Headlines should be attributed to the press, not the scientific community. It's obvious that nobody knows exactly where the heliopause ends so whether Voyager 1 has passed it is really a matter of debate. 

http://www.britannica.com/EBchecked/topic/260060/heliopause

http://voyager.jpl.nasa.gov/mission/interstellar.html

Sic itur ad astra!

Chance favors the prepared mind.

A man is a small thing, and the night is very large and full of wonders.

  • Member since
    July, 2013
Posted by Harvey Marshall on Friday, September 13, 2013 4:01 PM

It is nice to think that something is leaving our solar system, even if it is still possibly in the fringe area.  Hopefully Voyager 1 will still send information back for a while yet. When will Voyage 2 escape from the far reaches of the solar system and  heliopause, etc and be in the Oort cloud area?  

  • Member since
    October, 2007
Posted by Aratus on Friday, September 13, 2013 5:17 PM

My response to the news item was "not again!"

Checking the BBC archive I came up with 3 reports that it already had, in 2003, 2005 and 2012.   To be fair in 2011, they reported that it hadn't yet!

It seems to be a good story to dust off the shelf every so often.   The term, 'edge of the solar system' is meaningless.    The answer depends on why you are asking the question, and that is probably determined by what you consider important.   The scientists being interviewed for these reports seem to be interested in definitions for the sake of it.  

Harvey:  The Oort cloud is supposes to be nearly a light year away.   Voyager 1 is around 17 light hours away!   Perhaps that will give some idea of voyager's tiny journey in stellar terms.

Aratus

Location:  North West Devon, UK

-------------------------------------------------

Celestron Nexstar8i (8" SCT).

Celestron Skymaster binoculars 15x70

Other:0.63 & 0.33 correctors. X2 & X4 barlow.

Imagers: Meade DSI & Celestron NexImage.  Canon EOS 550D

 

 

  • Member since
    November, 2011
  • From: SE MA, U.S.A.
Posted by mr Q on Thursday, September 19, 2013 10:14 AM

A couple days ago I was listening to an AM radio (news/talk format) and with the anouncement of the upcoming news came the words,"Voyager leaves the galaxy!" Surprise But during the news item it was corrected to "the solar system". At least the right info did get aired, finally.

Mead DS-10 (10" newt)

10x50 Focal Bino

10x70 Orion Bino

What goes around, comes around, eventually.Wink

  • Member since
    April, 2012
  • From: North Carolina east coast USA
Posted by stepping beyond on Friday, September 20, 2013 12:42 PM

Thanks for that Mr. Q . I'm not downing the scientific community . We AA want the facts , not a non factual comment that they must recant later. But nobodies perfect !We all have had a time with this "TOPIC" Dave has reassured the same conclusion that I've had , "IN FACT" voyager has left our SOLAR SYSTEM c/o Scientific America  2012, so we all can relax and take a deep sigh of relief. Thank you all for the answers given .

  • Member since
    August, 2007
Posted by Primordial on Friday, September 20, 2013 2:53 PM

Stepping Beyond : If SETI reports hearing Blue Berry Hill by Fats Domino comming from a near by star we could consider that as a conformation. Just kidding.

Seriously, I did catch a short piece on a news recording made a couple days back, which came to my attention just a few seconds ago, and believe it or not, an 8 track recording, which was transmitted back to NASA JPL from the the voyager system an audible tone mix near the range of 1KHZ with some harmonic distortion. They indicated this could be ionization which they expected, but they explained it would be examined in detail. At this time they are refering to this position as Alien Territory. So I'm just the messanger.

 

  • Member since
    April, 2012
  • From: North Carolina east coast USA
Posted by stepping beyond on Friday, September 20, 2013 4:27 PM
Thanks primordial, Great detective work and I wouldn't put SETI in the hot seat as of yet. Everything is monitored everywhere nowadays, next we'll start hearing feedback coming from our kitchen appliances. I just stick to my standard " Believe nothing I hear and half of what I see".
  • Member since
    April, 2012
  • From: North Carolina east coast USA
Posted by stepping beyond on Friday, September 20, 2013 4:30 PM

Aratus

My response to the news item was "not again!"

Checking the BBC archive I came up with 3 reports that it already had, in 2003, 2005 and 2012.   To be fair in 2011, they reported that it hadn't yet!

It seems to be a good story to dust off the shelf every so often.   The term, 'edge of the solar system' is meaningless.    The answer depends on why you are asking the question, and that is probably determined by what you consider important.   The scientists being interviewed for these reports seem to be interested in definitions for the sake of it.  

Harvey:  The Oort cloud is supposes to be nearly a light year away.   Voyager 1 is around 17 light hours away!   Perhaps that will give some idea of voyager's tiny journey in stellar terms. I really enjoyed that reply Aratus, still laughing.

 

  • Member since
    April, 2012
  • From: North Carolina east coast USA
Posted by stepping beyond on Friday, September 20, 2013 4:33 PM

Very informative Harvey, You'd think that somebody will let us AA know something factual, not a script you have to pick apart iust to get the facts.

Moderator
  • Member since
    July, 2001
  • From: PA, USA, Earth Moderator
Posted by DaveMitsky on Saturday, September 21, 2013 1:36 PM

stepping beyond,

You shouldn't make judgments based on what is written in the popular press by reporters who often have little understanding of scientific matters and by what is said on the radio and televsion by "news readers" who are far from being scientists.  As the ASH Pubilicity Chairman for five years, I had personal experience dealing with the local press and was always disappointed but was not surprised by the mistakes made in articles about various upcoming astronomical events.  It got to the point where I would ask to see the reporter's article in advance to correct errors but I was always told no.

There are many topics in the sciences where there are differences of opinion, often contentious, among scientists.  Anyone who's read some of the recent articles on Voyager 1 carefully would have learned that there was no easy way to measure whether the spacecraft had passed the heliosphere until earlier this year.  The boundary of the solar system can be defined in various ways I suppose but in this case it was the region where the Sun's magnetic influence ends and the interstellar medium begins.

When it comes to the Internet, it's wise to consult reliable sources. 

http://www.scientificamerican.com/article.cfm?id=voyager-1-leaves-solar-system&WT.mc_id=SA_WR_20130920

Scientists have long been expecting Voyager 1 to exit the bubble of space containing particles from the sun, called the heliosphere, and enter a region where particles are much more plentiful and come from ancient explosions of other stars. But because Voyager 1 has lost its ability to measure this particle plasma, there was no easy way to tell when the transition had occurred.

 A boon came from an eruption on the sun in March 2012, which sent waves of solar material out into space. When this ejection reached Voyager 1 13 months later in April 2013, it set the local plasma vibrating. Voyager 1's plasma wave instrument (separate from the defunct plasma particle detector) was able to measure the pitch of these vibrations, which in turn reflected the density of plasma around the spacecraft. The results show that Voyager 1 is surrounded by plasma more than 40 times denser than it encountered earlier, when it was in the heliosphere. “Because there’s no other possible conclusion, I think we’re forced to and obliged to conclude that we’re truly in the interstellar medium,” physicist Gary Zank of the University of Alabama in Huntsville said during a press conference today.

 Based on abrupt changes in the apparent plasma density around the spacecraft, the researchers were even able to pinpoint August 25, 2012 as the most likely date that Voyager 1 left the solar system, crossing the heliopause, the boundary between the heliosphere and the interstellar medium.

See also http://web.mit.edu/newsoffice/2013/voyager-1-crossing-and-interstellar-exploration-0916.html and http://iopscience.iop.org/2041-8205/774/1/L8/ and http://www-ssg.sr.unh.edu/ism/what1.html

Dave Mitsky

 

Sic itur ad astra!

Chance favors the prepared mind.

A man is a small thing, and the night is very large and full of wonders.

  • Member since
    November, 2011
  • From: SE MA, U.S.A.
Posted by mr Q on Sunday, September 22, 2013 3:02 AM
But wait! The point where the solar system "ends" is very vague and to be sure Voyager IS finally out of our solar system, it may take a few more years!

Mead DS-10 (10" newt)

10x50 Focal Bino

10x70 Orion Bino

What goes around, comes around, eventually.Wink

Moderator
  • Member since
    July, 2001
  • From: PA, USA, Earth Moderator
Posted by DaveMitsky on Sunday, September 22, 2013 10:23 AM

Sic itur ad astra!

Chance favors the prepared mind.

A man is a small thing, and the night is very large and full of wonders.

  • Member since
    April, 2012
  • From: North Carolina east coast USA
Posted by stepping beyond on Sunday, September 22, 2013 12:31 PM

I thank you very much for finding this out, I thought that was what I read and yes I do read scientific America but, like all things science based "You need others to back it up". So in fact Voyager has surpassed the Helioshere and that is wonderful news. I just have this brain damage thing and my cognition "stinks" for sure, I also get the hubble site newsletter , info from JPL etc....

Join our Community!

Our community is FREE to join. To participate you must either login or register for an account.

ADVERTISEMENT

FREE EMAIL NEWSLETTER

Receive news, sky-event information, observing tips, and more from Astronomy's weekly email newsletter.

ADVERTISEMENT
ADVERTISEMENT
Find us on Facebook

Loading...