I am an amateur stargazer and in need of a guidance to buy a telescope...

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  • Member since
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I am an amateur stargazer and in need of a guidance to buy a telescope...
Posted by addhaneshwar on Friday, January 24, 2014 8:56 AM

I am a amateur stargazer, mostly interested in viewing planets. moon n some bright nebulas. I am planning to buy a new telescope under the range of around Rupees 10K. I will be glad if I receive some guidance regarding the same.

One thing I am clear with is that I have decided to go for Reflector telescopes...

I have short listed 3 telescopes... do they have enough specifications for my needs? are there any other models which I can go for?

 

 

     
  Sky watcher 114 EQ1 National Geographic NG 114/900
Optical Design  Newtonian Reflector Newtonian Reflector
Diameter  114 mm 114 mm
Focal length  900 mm 900 mm
Secondary Mirror Diameter   ---  ---
Focal ratio  F/7.8 F/7.8
Highest Practical Power  228x 269x
Faintest Stellar Magnitude  12.9 12.8
Mount EQUATORIAL EQ1 Altazimuth Mount
Price 9660/- 7770/-
https://mail.google.com/mail/u/0/images/cleardot.gif
 
It has counter weight of 3.5 kg No counter weight
 
 
   
  Orion Altaz reflector  
Optical Design  Newtonian Reflector  
Diameter  76 mm  
Focal length  700 mm  
Secondary Mirror Diameter  20 mm  
Focal ratio  F/9.4  
Highest Practical Power  152x  
Faintest Stellar Magnitude     
Mount Altazimuth Mount  
Price 9300/-  
  No counter weight  

These are available online at http://www.tejraj.com/products.html

 Please suggest me which Telescope model to buy...

 

Thanks,

Amrut Dhaneshwar

(addhaneshwar@gmail.com)

 

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Posted by Antitax on Friday, January 24, 2014 1:18 PM

   Well, the choice is simple: the 76mm is too small, the 114mm National Geographic has the same optical specs (it needs no counterweights for it has an altaz mount) as the SW, but SW has much better reputation. The EQ-3 mount I have is built by SW and works very well. My two Sky-Watcher 6x30mm finders are great, too.

   Their scopes nearly always work as they should; to play it safe you should go for the Sky-Watcher scope. All the large Sky-Watcher newtonians I looked through were either good or very good, and countless reviews concluded the same.

  However, when I visited tejraj it seemed the scope you like has a lightweight EQ-1 mount, not the heavier EQ-2. Very light mounts are not as stable but they can be improved with a little ingenuity.

   By the way, your tropical latitude lets you peer pretty far into the southern celestial hemisphere, but how black is your sky?

TS 8x40 Wildlife, 10x50 Marine/Fujinon 16x70/TS 80mm triplet, 6x30 finder, EQ-3 mount, TS 2" 99% diagonal/Celestron C5+ and 6x30 finder, DIY tripod/5" Bahtinov/12" GSO dob, 8x50 finder/Meade 2" 24mm 82°/Hyperion 24,13,10mm 68°/TS Expanse 17mm 70°/SW 7mm Panorama 82°/Ultima 2x barlow/Astronomik UHC-E filter/Baader O-III/Astro Solar 5" & 80mm filters/Sky Atlas 2000/Rükl's Moon Atlas/Canon 400D/5mW green laser

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Posted by spacenut2015 on Friday, January 24, 2014 1:53 PM

Well i recently bought a telescope and i suggest if there is a astronomy club near you then join it. They might have a group of telescopes u could loan for a while. Also they would be able to help you decide as well. Best wishes.

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Posted by addhaneshwar on Friday, January 24, 2014 10:53 PM

@ Anitax...

Thank you so much for your guidance.  Ya your rite, SW has EQ 1 mount (counterweight of 3.5 kg) exucse me for the wrong info, but as you said I will plan to add upgrades. 

I am living in small town, it has really less light polution during night so I can enjoy star gazing under pretty dark sky. (For reference, almost all stars from Cygnus, Gemini and Orion constellations are visible with naked eyes). Even today before dawn I spotted Saturn and Mars....

So for this sky, will SW be enough? Or can you suggest any upgradtions or other telescope models...?

 

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Posted by addhaneshwar on Friday, January 24, 2014 10:58 PM

@Spacenut2015..

Thanks for your suggestion. I am actually searching for one. As of now, I am living in a kind of a small town so there are no such clubs. But I am going to attend some workshops regarding the same.

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Posted by Antitax on Saturday, January 25, 2014 4:11 AM

addhaneshwar

can you suggest any upgradtions or other telescope models...?

   It will obviously be somewhat larger scopes after making sure they have a parabolic primary mirror, because some unexpensive newtonians have an inferior spherical mirror to cut cost. A more massive mount is always good to have, too. The f/ratio should be around f/5 instead of f/8 or it will be too difficult to view wide portions of the sky. This model seems pretty ok, but it's outside your self-imposed budget:

http://www.tejraj.com/spica.html

   This other one solves the mounting problem with its dobsonian stand, but it's smaller and has a little more coma distortion at the edge of the field because it is an f/4:

http://www.tejraj.com/starblast45.html

   Going for a dobsonian scope suppresses the cost of the equatorial mount so more can be invested in larger and better optics. Plus, a dobsonian mount is very easy to improve, maintain and repair because it's all wood and plastic. On the other hand, an equatorial metal mechanism moves so slow it will pretty much never wear out.

   You are lucky to live in a small town; a blacker sky makes small scopes perform well.

  

  

TS 8x40 Wildlife, 10x50 Marine/Fujinon 16x70/TS 80mm triplet, 6x30 finder, EQ-3 mount, TS 2" 99% diagonal/Celestron C5+ and 6x30 finder, DIY tripod/5" Bahtinov/12" GSO dob, 8x50 finder/Meade 2" 24mm 82°/Hyperion 24,13,10mm 68°/TS Expanse 17mm 70°/SW 7mm Panorama 82°/Ultima 2x barlow/Astronomik UHC-E filter/Baader O-III/Astro Solar 5" & 80mm filters/Sky Atlas 2000/Rükl's Moon Atlas/Canon 400D/5mW green laser

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Posted by johnjohnson on Saturday, January 25, 2014 11:38 AM

Amrut

Of the telescopes listed the Skywatcher 114 / F7.8 would be the best choice. However the 114mm / 900mm tube on the EQ-1 mount makes for a long telescope tube on a tortionally impared mount. The moment arm of torque is just to great. The eq-1 is not up to the challenges of a 900mm tube. You would be very disappointed in high magnification focusing and would find it almost impossible. Slight wind will set the tube to deflections.

If you can save your money for about twice the budget you are looking at, this would be a much better starter scope IMO.

Mira 150S

Much more substantial EQ mount and much more aperture with shorter torque arm moment. This would make a much better introduction to astronomy than the 114 / 900 with less frustration.

 

JJ

20" F5 Obsession, OMI mirror .987 Strehl. 10" F4.7 reflector. 6" F5 ST reflector. 120mm F7.5 EON. 80mm F11.3 guide scope. SkyWatcher EQ-6 Hyper Tuned.   Flicker Astro Site   More Astro Images

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Posted by DaveMitsky on Saturday, January 25, 2014 12:41 PM

The Orion SkyQuest XT4.5 Dob is another good option.

http://www.tejraj.com/skyquest-xt45classic.html

Dave Mitsky

Sic itur ad astra!

Chance favors the prepared mind.

A man is a small thing, and the night is very large and full of wonders.

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Posted by addhaneshwar on Monday, January 27, 2014 1:37 AM

@ Antitax...

  The models you have suggested are simply perfect but I have to draw a line at Rs 10K budget. So if you dont mind, can you suggest me 1 thing.. what if I buy SW telescope and replace EQ-1 mount with EQ-2. Will that help? 

There is one more model availble at Tejraj... Its Star Tracker 114 EQ-2. It has some good specifications, but I am not confident about that brand. If you can please check http://www.tejraj.com/sky-114eq.html

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Posted by addhaneshwar on Monday, January 27, 2014 3:40 AM

@ John....

Thanks for your suggestion. The telescope model you suggested is truely perfect but its above my financial limit. So I want to ask is that, for 700mm tube will EQ-1 mount work well? Or can I upgraade some more counterweight for EQ-1 with 900mm to increase its stability? 

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Posted by Antitax on Monday, January 27, 2014 2:24 PM

addhaneshwar

what if I buy SW telescope and replace EQ-1 mount with EQ-2. Will that help? 

There is one more model availble at Tejraj... Its Star Tracker 114 EQ-2. It has some good specifications, but I am not confident about that brand.

   I'm not confident about that unknown brand either. Regarding the Sky-Watcher reflector you like, replacing the mount will cost an extra; you're better off buying the EQ-2-mounted scope to start with. Or take the EQ-1-mounted scope and make it heavier by filling the hollow tube legs with cleaned, dried sand (to avoid corrosion).

   Then look for burrs and unevenness everywhere in the mechanism, and file them flat. Tighter contact between parts makes the mount vibrate like one single thing, but poorly adjusted parts vibrate separately, making the whole wobbly. Moreover, polished parts move more smoothly. You can also insert felt or rubber washers between moving parts to absorb vibrations, however that's effective only if you insert them at all possible places.

   I've never done that job on an EQ-1 but I did on an lightweight altaz mount for a 60mm refractor, on an AZ-3, and two Eq-3 mounts, and they became more stable. Adding counterweights on the counterweight shaft doesn't work because they have to match the telescope's weight; imbalance makes the scope wobbly like poor adjustement does.

   On the other hand, adding weight inside the tripod legs does work. Some simply attach a heavy object to the mount's central shaft, and let it hang under the scope but that's not elegant. Improving the blackening inside the optical tube and the focuser also improves a scope for very little money. If your eyepieces are the simple Kellner-type (three lenses in two groups) or Plössl-type (four lenses also in two groups), and you feel confident taking them apart, improving their contrast with matte black paint is another unexpensive progress.

   I did it in all the basic eyepieces I got my hands on; I paint the lens edges with a felt pen, and all the innards with ordinary paint. Since some lenses are glued together, it's like having only two lenses to work with, hardly a way to be confused at reassembly.

   Unexpensive scopes have more potential than they seem to have, but you must put some labor into them, cause the factory couldn't.

TS 8x40 Wildlife, 10x50 Marine/Fujinon 16x70/TS 80mm triplet, 6x30 finder, EQ-3 mount, TS 2" 99% diagonal/Celestron C5+ and 6x30 finder, DIY tripod/5" Bahtinov/12" GSO dob, 8x50 finder/Meade 2" 24mm 82°/Hyperion 24,13,10mm 68°/TS Expanse 17mm 70°/SW 7mm Panorama 82°/Ultima 2x barlow/Astronomik UHC-E filter/Baader O-III/Astro Solar 5" & 80mm filters/Sky Atlas 2000/Rükl's Moon Atlas/Canon 400D/5mW green laser

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Posted by addhaneshwar on Monday, January 27, 2014 6:22 PM
@ Antitax.... Wow.... amazing info!!!! thank you so much! I am so glad... now I hope soon I will post a forum about telling 'how I tracked down d Orion nebula' rather than simply asking 'how to buy a telescope'?... :-) ... thanks a lot....
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Posted by Antitax on Wednesday, January 29, 2014 6:42 AM

   I looked again and the Bresser Spica scope has the thinnest of all tripods with legs made up of three aluminum studs. Even the accessory tray is the flimsiest of all, I recognize the kind of tripod I reinforced for the 60mm refractor. It seems underbuilt for a 130mm scope, but the first Sky-Watcher telescope you indicated has a serious tripod, the same as in my AZ-3 and EQ-3 mounts.

   Bresser may have a thicker mount in their Spica model, but sitting on a thin tripod it will be less stable than the SW for two reasons: the SW tube has less weight and less magnification. All in all, to play it safe and to avoid busting your budget, I'd go for the Sky-Watcher intrument.

   Now I remember some reviews of Bresser lens and mirror scope with smooth optics but others were rough, something unheard of with recent Sky-Watcher scopes.

TS 8x40 Wildlife, 10x50 Marine/Fujinon 16x70/TS 80mm triplet, 6x30 finder, EQ-3 mount, TS 2" 99% diagonal/Celestron C5+ and 6x30 finder, DIY tripod/5" Bahtinov/12" GSO dob, 8x50 finder/Meade 2" 24mm 82°/Hyperion 24,13,10mm 68°/TS Expanse 17mm 70°/SW 7mm Panorama 82°/Ultima 2x barlow/Astronomik UHC-E filter/Baader O-III/Astro Solar 5" & 80mm filters/Sky Atlas 2000/Rükl's Moon Atlas/Canon 400D/5mW green laser

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Posted by addhaneshwar on Wednesday, January 29, 2014 11:15 AM

@ Antitax...

Yes Bresser has good magnification as compared with that of SW. Nyways thanx for giving me the confidence for buying SW BKP1149EQ1 (Black Diamond). Actually I also went through some more options, and surprisingly NatGeo also seems to provide scopes within my range but it has AZ mount. So I will go for either SW or NatGeo...

Plz hav a look if you can...

http://www.tejraj.com/114900-national-geographic.html

http://www.tejraj.com/reflectors-sk1149.html

 

 

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Posted by Antitax on Wednesday, January 29, 2014 11:42 AM

   The NatGeo also has the weak tripod... Only the Sky-Watcher remains.

TS 8x40 Wildlife, 10x50 Marine/Fujinon 16x70/TS 80mm triplet, 6x30 finder, EQ-3 mount, TS 2" 99% diagonal/Celestron C5+ and 6x30 finder, DIY tripod/5" Bahtinov/12" GSO dob, 8x50 finder/Meade 2" 24mm 82°/Hyperion 24,13,10mm 68°/TS Expanse 17mm 70°/SW 7mm Panorama 82°/Ultima 2x barlow/Astronomik UHC-E filter/Baader O-III/Astro Solar 5" & 80mm filters/Sky Atlas 2000/Rükl's Moon Atlas/Canon 400D/5mW green laser

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Posted by addhaneshwar on Wednesday, January 29, 2014 12:27 PM
@Antitax.... so now we have the winner :-)
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Posted by MAV3R1K on Wednesday, March 05, 2014 3:58 PM
Hey , can you please tell me best between the two ! I'll be very much thankful to you ! > http://www.tejraj.com/sky1149-eq.html --- and --- http://www.tejraj.com/reflectors-sk1149.html
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Posted by addhaneshwar on Thursday, March 06, 2014 2:21 AM

Hey...

Of the two I am using SkyWachter 1149 EQ1, its pretty good. The other one, Star Tracker brand I am not aware of and also coudnt find any reviews. So I think you can go for SkyWatcher telescope ( http://www.tejraj.com/reflectors-sk1149.html ). 

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Posted by Antitax on Thursday, March 06, 2014 11:53 AM

   I agree. The Sky-Watcher Black Diamond has a parabolic mirror, the other scope may or may not have one but when vendors don't specify that, it usually means the mirror is an inferior spherical shape. Plus the Sky-Watcher's tripod is a proven design (I own two of these) that you can stabilize some more by adding weight.

   Since the legs are hollow, filling them with dried gravel does the trick for almost no cost. A little deburring and polishing here and there makes motion smoother if it's needed. Sky-Watcher eyepieces are quite good, too, but I don't know the quality of the eyepieces provided with the other scope.

   Even the eyepieces in Sky-Watcher 6x30 finders are very good, I would feel safer buying the Black Diamond.

TS 8x40 Wildlife, 10x50 Marine/Fujinon 16x70/TS 80mm triplet, 6x30 finder, EQ-3 mount, TS 2" 99% diagonal/Celestron C5+ and 6x30 finder, DIY tripod/5" Bahtinov/12" GSO dob, 8x50 finder/Meade 2" 24mm 82°/Hyperion 24,13,10mm 68°/TS Expanse 17mm 70°/SW 7mm Panorama 82°/Ultima 2x barlow/Astronomik UHC-E filter/Baader O-III/Astro Solar 5" & 80mm filters/Sky Atlas 2000/Rükl's Moon Atlas/Canon 400D/5mW green laser

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Posted by MAV3R1K on Thursday, March 06, 2014 12:16 PM
Thanks addhanesh...that's satisfying :)
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Posted by MAV3R1K on Thursday, March 06, 2014 12:17 PM
Thanks a lot antitax, now i'll go for black diamond ! Cheers :) Those little differences are quite important i guess :P
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Posted by addhaneshwar on Friday, March 07, 2014 4:47 AM

To Antitax,

              Hey I forgot to tell you that a week ago I finally purchased my first Telescope ever. I brought SkyWatcher reflector (116 mm / 900 mm ) with EQ1 mount. They also provided two eyepieces, 25 mm and 10 mm. Also a 2X barlow lense.

              I already started enjoying the night beauty. Just to mention, I spotted and enjoyed the beauty of Orion nebula, Ghost of Mirach and also Andromeda galaxy ( spotted after 4 days search) and Pleides. I also saw Satrun with its ring, Jupiter with its Moon. No need to mention about Mars and beautiful Moon.. :)

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Posted by addhaneshwar on Friday, March 07, 2014 4:48 AM

@  MAV3R1K ...

 Your most welcome... do post once you purchase one... :)

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Posted by Antitax on Friday, March 07, 2014 10:41 AM

addhaneshwar

I spotted and enjoyed the beauty of Orion nebula, Ghost of Mirach

 
   Ghost of Mirach, NGC 404 close to Beta Andromeda, right? Then your sky and your telescope must be pretty good because the Ghost is only a small faint elliptical, and the glare from Beta lowers contrast all around it.

TS 8x40 Wildlife, 10x50 Marine/Fujinon 16x70/TS 80mm triplet, 6x30 finder, EQ-3 mount, TS 2" 99% diagonal/Celestron C5+ and 6x30 finder, DIY tripod/5" Bahtinov/12" GSO dob, 8x50 finder/Meade 2" 24mm 82°/Hyperion 24,13,10mm 68°/TS Expanse 17mm 70°/SW 7mm Panorama 82°/Ultima 2x barlow/Astronomik UHC-E filter/Baader O-III/Astro Solar 5" & 80mm filters/Sky Atlas 2000/Rükl's Moon Atlas/Canon 400D/5mW green laser

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Posted by addhaneshwar on Saturday, March 08, 2014 1:06 AM

To Antitax,

Ya ghost of Mirach only. Your right, that night all town's electricity went off, and so it was complete black out. I was actually looking up for Andromeda. So I was following some steps to track it down so I first spotted the Mirach using finder scope and 25 mm telescope. But when I replaced the eyepiece with 10 mm + 2X barlow and focused , I saw two stars one is bright orange reddish and the another one is small bluish and kinda fuzzy. So then I realised that its actually Mirach and its Ghost... about half an hour I was tracking it... :)  is it right?

Hey I will be glad if you could suggest me some objects to look up during night, apart from planets and all.... I am actually trying to look up for little bee hive but i am not able to...

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Posted by Antitax on Saturday, March 08, 2014 1:44 PM

addhaneshwar

I saw two stars one is bright orange reddish and the another one is small bluish and kinda fuzzy.

   If you saw two stars of that description you probably stumbled upon Gamma Andromedae, a famous double at the eastern tip of the constellation. The Ghost of Mirach (Beta Andromedae) is not a star, it's an elliptical galaxy. If the thing you saw close to the orangish star was less than a Jupiter diameter from the orange star, what you saw is the double.

   But if what you saw near a bright yellow-orange star was several Jupiter diameters away, very, very faint and extended, that was the Ghost.

   The blue companion in the Gamma Andromedae double can look a bit bloated because of turbulence, but never as extended as the Ghost. One more easy and similar double is Albireo, a yellow star with a blue companion at the beak of the long extended neck of the bird Cygnus.

   If I were you, I'd spend a couple evenings examining every star you see with the naked eye through the telescope. You'll know how naked eye view and telescopic view relate, you'll discover the nuances in star colors, and stumble upon several doubles while you get used to navigating the celestial globe.

   No amount of "expert advice" will replace practice.

TS 8x40 Wildlife, 10x50 Marine/Fujinon 16x70/TS 80mm triplet, 6x30 finder, EQ-3 mount, TS 2" 99% diagonal/Celestron C5+ and 6x30 finder, DIY tripod/5" Bahtinov/12" GSO dob, 8x50 finder/Meade 2" 24mm 82°/Hyperion 24,13,10mm 68°/TS Expanse 17mm 70°/SW 7mm Panorama 82°/Ultima 2x barlow/Astronomik UHC-E filter/Baader O-III/Astro Solar 5" & 80mm filters/Sky Atlas 2000/Rükl's Moon Atlas/Canon 400D/5mW green laser

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Posted by DaveMitsky on Saturday, March 08, 2014 4:25 PM

No, but good advice certainly can eliminate a lot of wasted time and frustration, Antitax.

NGC 404 (the Ghost of Mirach or Mirach's Ghost) is actually a SA(s)O dwarf lenticular galaxy that is situated 6 arc minutes northwest of Mirach. 

http://earthsky.org/todays-image/a-galaxy-called-mirachs-ghost

http://oneminuteastronomer.com/9300/the-ghost-of-mirach/

Gamma Andromedae is actually a quadruple star, albeit a very difficult one to fully resolve, and lies quite a distance from Mirach.

http://earthsky.org/brightest-stars/almach-andromedas-colorful-double-star

http://www.theskyscrapers.org/almach

I suggest that you start with the brighter Messier objects visible at this time of year, addhaneshwar.  

http://www.seds.org/messier/ (the Messier Catalog) 

Here are some additional lists of deep-sky objects:

http://messier.seds.org/xtra/similar/sac110bn.html (the SAC's best objects in the NGC list) 

http://messier.seds.org/xtra/similar/rasc-ngc.html (the RASC's finest NGC objects list) 

http://www.tyler.net/lphilpot/saa100.html (the sci.astro.amateur 100) 

http://www.taas.org/taas200.html?type=10 (the TAAS 200) 

http://www.stpeteastronomyclub.org/resources/thelist.pdf (the Vic Menard 400)

http://www.raycash.org/dm600.htm (the Orion Deep Map 600)

http://messier.seds.org/xtra/similar/m1000.txt (the Magnificent 1000 by Tom Hoffelder)

http://www.1000plus.com/2000plus/ (the Tomm Lorenzin 2000+)

Binary and carbon stars are good targets for small telescopes.

http://www.astroleague.org/al/obsclubs/dblstar/dblstar2.html (binary stars) 

http://www.astrosurf.com/buil/us/peculiar2/carbon.htm (carbon stars) 

The following are the monthly top ten DSO lists from my Celestial Calendar:

Top ten deep-sky objects for January: M1, M36, M37, M38, M42, M43, M78, M79, NGC 1501, NGC 2024 

The objects listed above are located between 4:00 and 6:00 hours of right ascension. 

Top ten deep-sky objects for February: M35, M41, M46, M47, M50, M93, NGC 2261, NGC 2362, NGC 2392, NGC 2403 

The objects listed above are located between 6:00 and 8:00 hours of right ascension. 

Top ten deep-sky objects for March: M44, M48, M67, M81, M82, NGC 2654, NGC 2683, NGC 2835, NGC 2841, NGC 2903 

The objects listed above are located between 8:00 and 10:00 hours of right ascension. 

Top ten deep-sky objects for April: M65, M66, M95, M96, M97, M105, M108, NGC 3115, NGC 3242, NGC 3628 

The objects listed above are located between 10:00 and 12:00 hours of right ascension. 

Top ten deep-sky objects for May: M3, M51, M63, M64, M83, M87, M104, M106, NGC 4449, NGC 4565 

The objects listed above are located between 12:00 and 14:00 hours of right ascension. 

Top ten deep-sky objects for June: M5, M101, M102, NGC 5566, NGC 5585, NGC 5689, NGC 5746, NGC 5813, NGC 5838, NGC 5907 

The objects listed above are located between 14:00 and 16:00 hours of right ascension. 

Top ten deep-sky objects for July: M4, M6, M7, M10, M12, M13, M92, NGC 6210, NGC 6231, NGC 6543 

The objects listed above are located between 16:00 and 18:00 hours of right ascension. 

Top ten deep-sky objects for August: M8, M11, M16, M17, M20, M22, M24, M27, M55, M57 

The objects listed above are located between 18:00 and 20:00 hours of right ascension. 

Top ten deep-sky objects for September: IC 1396, M2, M15, M30, NGC 6888, NGC 6946, NGC 6960, NGC 6992, NGC 7000, NGC 7009 

The objects listed above are located between 20:00 and 22:00 hours of right ascension. 

Top ten deep-sky objects for October: K12, M52, NGC 7209, NGC 7293, NGC 7331, NGC 7332, NGC 7339, NGC 7640, NGC 7662, NGC 7789 

The objects listed above are located between 22:00 and 24:00 hours of right ascension. 

Top ten deep-sky objects for November: M31, M32, M33, M76, M103, M110, NGC 40, NGC 253, NGC 457, NGC 752 

The objects listed above are located between 0:00 and 2:00 hours of right ascension. 

Top ten deep-sky objects for December: M34, M45, M77, NGC 869, NGC 884, NGC 891, NGC 1023, NGC 1232, NGC 1332, NGC 1360 

The objects listed above are located between 2:00 and 4:00 hours of right ascension.

Dave Mitsky

Sic itur ad astra!

Chance favors the prepared mind.

A man is a small thing, and the night is very large and full of wonders.

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Posted by DaveMitsky on Sunday, March 09, 2014 1:00 AM

addhaneshwar

Hey I will be glad if you could suggest me some objects to look up during night, apart from planets and all.... I am actually trying to look up for little bee hive but i am not able to...

 
If by the Little Beehive Cluster, you mean M41, it lies about 4 degrees south of Sirius.  A trio of stars that include Pi and 15 Canis Majoris is situated to the northeast of M41.
 
 
 
M44 (the Beehive Cluster or Praesepe) is located in Cancer and is a fairly easy naked-eye target from a dark site.
 
 
 
Dave Mitsky

Sic itur ad astra!

Chance favors the prepared mind.

A man is a small thing, and the night is very large and full of wonders.

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