BUYING A TELESCOPE

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  • Member since
    September, 2013
BUYING A TELESCOPE
Posted by fedler50 on Thursday, September 12, 2013 7:36 PM

live outside philly.what type of telescope should i get? would like to see saturn etc.

  • Member since
    November, 2009
Posted by Poppa Chris on Thursday, September 12, 2013 8:43 PM

What sort of budget do you have?

---Poppa Chris---

Denham Springs, Louisiana USA

"Second star to the right - Then straight on until morning!" - Peter Pan

Celestron CPC1100GPS (XLT) - 279mm aperature, 2800mm Focal length. (f10) Celestron Ultima LX (70deg AFOV) Eyepieces 32mm thru 5mm, Canon EOS Rebel T2i DSLR, Backyard EOS imaging software, Orion Star Shoot Planetary Imager IV, Celestron Skymaster 15x70 binoculars

 

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  • Member since
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  • From: PA, USA, Earth Moderator
Posted by DaveMitsky on Friday, September 13, 2013 1:07 AM

A 6" f/8 or 8" f/6 Newtonian reflector on an alt-azimuth mount, commonly known as a Dob, is generally the most cost-effective telescope but may not fit your requirements.

I recommend paying Skies Unlimited a visit.  It's a first-class astronomy shop and is located just south of Pottstown, off of Route 100 at 52 Glocker Way.

www.skiesunlimited.net/Home.jsp

You may want to attend a meeting of the Delaware Valley Amateur Astronomers or one of the club's public star parties.  Although I don't live near Philly, I've been a member of the DVAA for many years.  It's a great club.

dvaa.org/.../page.php

http://dvaa.org/php/page.php?body=Events

Dave Mitsky

Sic itur ad astra!

Chance favors the prepared mind.

A man is a small thing, and the night is very large and full of wonders.

  • Member since
    March, 2008
Posted by Antitax on Friday, September 13, 2013 10:22 AM

  Many people assume viewing Saturn takes a special or large telescope but the first time I saw its rings all I had was my brother's 40mm spotting scope, with a zoom 13x to 40x eyepiece. At 13x the rings were tiny but unmistakable. Jupiter's main belts were also discerned easily at 40x.

  Speaking of assumptions, a telescope is not your first acquisition. Just like you wouldn't examine a small object with a 50x or 100x microscope before taking an overall look at 4x to 10x or so with a magnifier, you don't jump the gun from naked eye sight to telescopic 50x or 100x sight. Because in both cases you see such a small piece of the scene you don't know where it fits and you're lost.

  The in-between is filled by binoculars. 8x to 10x, 40mm to 50mm is fine for beginners. It surprises many newcomers but lots of deep-space targets are so broad they don't fit in a telescope's viewfield. The much wider field of binocs frames them well, on the other hand.

  Maybe you have noticed most telescopes have a smaller scope piggybacked onto them, that small scope has the same specs as binoculars for the reasons I cited.

TS 8x40 Wildlife, 10x50 Marine/Fujinon 16x70/TS 80mm triplet, 6x30 finder, EQ-3 mount, TS 2" 99% diagonal/Celestron C5+ and 6x30 finder, DIY tripod/5" Bahtinov/12" GSO dob, 8x50 finder/Meade 2" 24mm 82°/Hyperion 24,13,10mm 68°/TS Expanse 17mm 70°/SW 7mm Panorama 82°/Ultima 2x barlow/Astronomik UHC-E filter/Baader O-III/Astro Solar 5" & 80mm filters/Sky Atlas 2000/Rükl's Moon Atlas/Canon 400D/5mW green laser

  • Member since
    September, 2013
Posted by fedler50 on Thursday, September 19, 2013 6:15 PM

got a orion astroview 6 eq for 369.00 

  • Member since
    March, 2008
Posted by Antitax on Friday, September 20, 2013 4:52 PM

   Cool scope and good deal. Since you live outside Philly - hopefully very far outside - your skies shouldn't be too bright with light pollution, so the 6-incher can perform.

TS 8x40 Wildlife, 10x50 Marine/Fujinon 16x70/TS 80mm triplet, 6x30 finder, EQ-3 mount, TS 2" 99% diagonal/Celestron C5+ and 6x30 finder, DIY tripod/5" Bahtinov/12" GSO dob, 8x50 finder/Meade 2" 24mm 82°/Hyperion 24,13,10mm 68°/TS Expanse 17mm 70°/SW 7mm Panorama 82°/Ultima 2x barlow/Astronomik UHC-E filter/Baader O-III/Astro Solar 5" & 80mm filters/Sky Atlas 2000/Rükl's Moon Atlas/Canon 400D/5mW green laser

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  • Member since
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  • From: PA, USA, Earth Moderator
Posted by DaveMitsky on Saturday, September 21, 2013 11:11 AM

One of the closest spots to Philadelphia that has reasonably dark skies is French Creek State Park.

http://www.dcnr.state.pa.us/stateparks/findapark/frenchcreek/ 

You may be interested in attending next year's CAS Starfest at Hopewell Furnace.

http://chesmontastro.org/files/Starfest%20flier%202013%20Color-1.pdf

Dave Mitsky

Sic itur ad astra!

Chance favors the prepared mind.

A man is a small thing, and the night is very large and full of wonders.

  • Member since
    September, 2013
Posted by fedler50 on Tuesday, September 24, 2013 8:03 PM

my scope came with a 25mm and a 10mm lens.what other lens do i need?

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  • Member since
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  • From: PA, USA, Earth Moderator
Posted by DaveMitsky on Tuesday, September 24, 2013 9:04 PM

You may want to consider a 7mm (or 8mm) eyepiece with extended eye relief and a 32mm Plossl to maximize your scope's true field of view.  Add a 2x Barlow lens and you'll have a nice range of focal lengths of 3.5mm, 5mm, 7mm, 10mm, 12.5mm, 16mm, 25mm, and 32mm. 

https://www.astronomics.com/astro-tech-paradigm-dual-ed-eyepieces_c52.aspx

http://www.celestron.com/astronomy/series/x-cel-lx-series/

http://www.astro.shoregalaxy.com/index_010.htm

Dave Mitsky

Sic itur ad astra!

Chance favors the prepared mind.

A man is a small thing, and the night is very large and full of wonders.

  • Member since
    February, 2003
Posted by cooltech on Wednesday, September 25, 2013 12:33 PM

Nice start and as you can see your gettign great help from the professionals. I grew up in Philly and back in the late 1960's saw Saturn, Jupiter and Venus for the first time through a small 2 1/4 refractor my grandfather had given me for my birthday. I was 16 yrs old if I remember correctly. Even started an astronomy club. Lasted about 2 yrs. Cool for a kid. Oh yea, I still have that telescope!

I'm now living in Bucks County and still love astronomy

cooltechCool

 

cooltech

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