Would Like to See a Story on New Space Propulsion Technologies

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  • Member since
    August, 2013
Would Like to See a Story on New Space Propulsion Technologies
Posted by Longtime Amateur on Saturday, August 24, 2013 5:27 PM

Sending Space Probes to any of the Planets takes way too long. I would like to see an in depth story comparing possible new space propulsion technologies. How much mass could be sent to a planet in how much time using each new propulsion technology compared to existing rockets?

New propulsion technologies could include Variable Specific Impulse Magnetoplasma Rockets (VASIMR), Ion propulsion, Solar Sailing, etc. 

With the advent of Cubsats it seems to me that one of these very low mass spacecraft could be sent on a planetary trajectory using ion engines or solar sailing. Larger spacecraft could use VASIMR.

I think an in depth story on future possible propulsion technologies would be interesting to Astronomy readers. 

  • Member since
    August, 2010
Posted by PeakOilBill on Saturday, November 16, 2013 11:56 PM

Longtime, You might want to check out the nasaspaceflight.com website. Pros discuss all kinds of space stuff on it. I visit it quite a lot, since I'm 12 miles from Stennis and 25 from Michoud. I can hear the rocket engines being test fired at Stennis. I can feel the metal double garage door vibrating sometime when the atmosphere is right. Bill in Slidell, LA. 

None.

  • Member since
    August, 2007
Posted by Primordial on Thursday, April 03, 2014 10:11 AM

Longtime Amateur : I can't fulfill your want, but there is an article in May's issue of Discover magazine, P36, which may interest you, it pertains to the VASIMR VX200. Sorry This is so late, hope you are still here. Thanks for you introduction of the VASMIR to my knowledge.

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