Finding My star...

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  • Member since
    February, 2012
Finding My star...
Posted by PaulStar on Saturday, February 18, 2012 7:42 PM

Hi 

My name is Paul. All this is new to me. I go a star registry for a B-Day present from my son. I would like to know if anyone can help me or knows of a site I can go to to locate my star. Here is the info I have to locate it.

Star Code: STARC8Z7SBWXFU

AGASC_ID: 4987784

RA: 2h 16m 47.1s

DEC: +0 degrees 1' 23.9"

MAG: 10.5

 I hope someone here can help me I went out to a astronomy get together last night and the person I talked with said it was by the constellation Libra and it looks like it maybe in a cluster of stars so it might be hard to locate. Let me know if you can help. You can always email me at pecharette@gmail.com

 

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  • Member since
    July, 2002
  • From: Texas
Posted by chipdatajeffB on Saturday, February 18, 2012 10:31 PM

Hi, Paul! Welcome to the Forum.

Here's the problem with what you're asking: we could tell you where the star is located, and even show you a chart (which you should have gotten along with the "purchase"), but it won't make a lot of sense to you unless we do that under the stars (while you're watching).

We can provide a star chart of Libra which identifies the star, but its magnitude of 10.5 means it is far too dim to see with the naked eye ... so the star chart won't make a lot of sense (it will have only a few stars bright enough to see naked eye.

Your best bet is to find a local club with a member who is willing to show you the star "live".

I'll make a chart for you and post it here, but I might not be able to identify the exact star as that Star Code you provided is probably some code belonging to the star registry ... it doesn't look to me like a standard catalog number. I can get "close" using the coordinates, and if there are no other stars in the area that are Mag 10.5, maybe we can ID it.

Back in a bit.

 

The universe is not only stranger than we imagine, it's stranger than we CAN imagine. --- JBS Haldane

Come visit me at Comanche Springs Astronomy Campus (we're on Google Maps) in Texas.

www.3rf.org

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  • Member since
    July, 2002
  • From: Texas
Posted by chipdatajeffB on Saturday, February 18, 2012 10:57 PM

Here is what your star field looks like. The bright star in the center is your star. The others at lower left are the only other ones you're likely to see in a small telescope. Most of the fuzzy dots in this photo are galaxies that you wouldn't see at all without a telescope of at least 12" aperture.

Even at that aperture, your star (the center one) would appear less bright than the dimmest of the 5 brightest stars at lower left.

This field of view is about the size of the Full Moon.

The universe is not only stranger than we imagine, it's stranger than we CAN imagine. --- JBS Haldane

Come visit me at Comanche Springs Astronomy Campus (we're on Google Maps) in Texas.

www.3rf.org

  • Member since
    November, 2011
  • From: SE MA, U.S.A.
Posted by mr Q on Monday, February 20, 2012 10:45 AM

Paul - This money making scam has been going on for some time. It caters to those with just the most rudimentary knowledge of the night sky. Most experienced star gazers know that all the stars visible to the naked eye have already had names/designations assigned to them. All the rest are too faint to see without some kind of optical aid.

I assume you did not know this because of your post. As amateurs, we learn by our mistakes and spreading the cautious word on this one is common in the astronomy community.

As Jeff pointed out, it's guaranteed that the star assigned to you (anyone) will not only be impossible to see with the naked eye, it will be very difficult to locate it with standard locating  methods, as Jeff tried to do.

A much more "from the heart" gift for your son would be to take him out on a observation session and show him some of the objects (with binos or telescope)  that populate our night sky. This would be a nice "one on one" bonding experience that I'm sure he will remember well into his adulthood. If this can't be done due to no equipment or knowledge of where some of these objects are, you can take him to a planetarium  show or a local star party  put on by a local club.

You can let him pick out a star and draw the stars around it with an arrow pointing to his star with his name, then frame it for his bedroom wall.

There are many ways of "gifting" your son with the night sky with a little imagination with far more appreciation from him than naming a star after him that neither of you may never get to see...and that's so sadSad  And with the above suggestions, it won't cost you any moneySmile, Wink & Grin

And by the way, Welcome to the forums!

Mead DS-10 (10" newt)

10x50 Focal Bino

10x70 Orion Bino

What goes around, comes around, eventually.Wink

  • Member since
    September, 2011
Posted by EdSylvis on Monday, February 20, 2012 11:07 AM

Bill, I don't want to appear to defend star registries as I believe that they are definitely a scam too, but I just wanted to correct a small misunderstanding that you made. The 'star registration' was a gift to Paul from his son, not the other way around. I also considered saying something about the registry, but given the circumstances I think Jeff did a great job answering the question without criticizing a gift that was already given. I do think, however, that it should be pointed out that star registries are just as big a scam as trying to sell someone a piece of the Brooklyn Bridge.

-Ed

Keep on Gazing!      
                              (33N X 112W  Phoenix, AZ - Clear Sky Chart) 

  • Member since
    November, 2011
  • From: SE MA, U.S.A.
Posted by mr Q on Monday, February 20, 2012 11:20 AM

Sorry - My errorEmbarrassed  A friend of mine had the same experience - his young daughter did the same thing and he didn't have the heart to tell her about the scam.

Well, if any other parent wants to do the same for his/her child, hopefully my reply will help. Anyways, it's the thought that counts, not so much the gift. My apologies Paul. Maybe on your son's birthday you can try my suggestions?

Mead DS-10 (10" newt)

10x50 Focal Bino

10x70 Orion Bino

What goes around, comes around, eventually.Wink

  • Member since
    September, 2011
Posted by EdSylvis on Monday, February 20, 2012 12:48 PM

mr Q

My apologies Paul. Maybe on your son's birthday you can try my suggestions?

That's a great idea, Bill, and a great way to expose him to the night sky. To see that there is much more there than just a 10.5 magnitude star with his father's name listed in some obscure registry that will likely never see the light of day in the near or distant future - or the light of the moon and stars. Wink

-Ed

Keep on Gazing!      
                              (33N X 112W  Phoenix, AZ - Clear Sky Chart) 

  • Member since
    January, 2014
Posted by Tom.Cox on Friday, January 03, 2014 4:58 PM

Hi!

Sorry about this but about to ask the same thing but could you please find my star or star field?

AGASC_ID: 15206368

RA: 5h 45min 59' 4.5"

DEC: +0 59' 4.5"

MAG: 14.5

 

I know people have said this is a 'scam' but i don't really care whatthey say as this is just so epic aha!

Many thanks

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  • Member since
    July, 2001
  • From: PA, USA, Earth Moderator
Posted by DaveMitsky on Friday, January 03, 2014 8:04 PM

Tom,

Unfortunately, the star itself is not epic.  At magnitude 14.5, it's 4 magnitudes or almost 40 times fainter (2.512 raised to the 4th power) than the OP's magnitude 10.5 star.  In fact, it's 1.3 times fainter than Pluto currently is.  In other words, this star would be rather difficult to see through a 12" telescope.

http://www.skyandtelescope.com/howto/basics/Stellar_Magnitude_System.html

For more on the ISR, see http://www.wired.com/techbiz/media/news/2001/12/49345

Dave Mitsky

Sic itur ad astra!

Chance favors the prepared mind.

A man is a small thing, and the night is very large and full of wonders.

  • Member since
    October, 2005
Posted by leo731 on Monday, January 06, 2014 1:21 PM

Wow.  Are these star registries so popular that they are using stars down to 14.5 mag now?  I had no idea they have remained so popular.

Huh?

L

 

A nebula in the eyepiece is worth two in the Atlas.

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  • Member since
    July, 2001
  • From: PA, USA, Earth Moderator
Posted by DaveMitsky on Wednesday, January 08, 2014 12:53 PM

It does seem hard to believe, Leo, given that there are approximately 45 million stars visible up to magnitude 14.5.

Dave Mitsky

Sic itur ad astra!

Chance favors the prepared mind.

A man is a small thing, and the night is very large and full of wonders.

  • Member since
    October, 2007
Posted by Aratus on Saturday, January 11, 2014 12:58 PM

I was curious about this so I found the 'International Star Registry' web site and it specifically says that the star can be 'pointed out'

  • Q: Am I buying the star?
  • A: No. We do not own the star, so we cannot sell it to you.
    This is like adopting the star. This star is associated with that special someone. It is something you can point at to know that there is something special out there for you.

I am assuming that in order to point at something, you have to be able to see it.   I wonder how many people pay to 'adopt a star', not realising that it will be impossible to 'point it out' to anyone.  

From an anthropological point of view it is interesting that many people look to the night's sky for some eternal comfort in their relationships.     However it is disturbing that a business should wish to make money out of people's love for each other, especially at vulnerable times.    By the time folk find their way here looking for their invisible star - it is too late.

 

Aratus

Location:  North West Devon, UK

-------------------------------------------------

Celestron Nexstar8i (8" SCT).

Celestron Skymaster binoculars 15x70

Other:0.63 & 0.33 correctors. X2 & X4 barlow.

Imagers: Meade DSI & Celestron NexImage.  Canon EOS 550D

 

 

  • Member since
    October, 2005
Posted by leo731 on Monday, January 13, 2014 1:23 PM

The inability to see the star that you are "buying" does seem unreasonable.  As Dave pointed out there are an awful lot of stars that should be up for "adoption" that would be visible in a small telescope. 

Of course my wife and I have a special star.  On our first date we took a sunset walk on the beach where I pointed out Sirius.  It became "our star" and she looks forward to seeing every Winter.  The good thing about our unofficial "adoption" is that not only did it cost us nothing but we can actually see "our" star every year without optical aid.  It doesn't matter a whit that it is "unofficial" or 'registered.'  It is nice to greet it every year and remember a special day in our lives.

L

A nebula in the eyepiece is worth two in the Atlas.

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