Autoguiders

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  • Member since
    December, 2012
Autoguiders
Posted by Protiss on Thursday, December 27, 2012 12:08 PM

So as a few of you already know, I recently purchased a CPC 1100.  I don't have a GEQ wedge, only the alt-az that comes with it.  I've tried getting some DFO photos, and am running into crazy bad walking (stars forming lines).  I've researched and it appears that it's basically because I'm using an alt-az mount.  Polar aligned GEQs with PEC seem to be one way to go, probably the best...

So my research also said that autoguiders can pretty much give the same results as a GEQ with PEC, but before choosing which to buy, I just have a few questions.

First, can the finderscope that comes with the CPC 1100 be used, or is it absolutely mandatory to get an ~80mm guide?  Celestron has an 80mm that fits their autoguider, but now we're talking ~$500-600 for the scope, autoguider, and rails.

Second, do autoguiders make adjustments in RA and DEC, or is the wedge going to be mandatory, for RA-only adjustment?

Third, any recommendations on good scopes/guiders?  Is the Celestron worth it, are there any alternatives?

Finally, I'm currently in my backyardeos trial, but weather conditions have been terrible.  Does backyardeos have any autoguide capability?  I haven't even opened it up yet as I haven't taken the scope out.

Thanks guys,

Aaron

--- Aaron ---

Celestron CPC 1100 (XLT) F10 - 6.3, HD Pro Equatorial Wedge, 2" SWA EPs (26, 32, 38mm, 70deg FOV)

Orion Awesome Autoguider - 80mm short-tube, StarShoot Autoguider

Canon EOS T3i DSLR, BackyardEOS, Deep Sky Stacker, Registax v6, Adobe Photoshop CS6

  • Member since
    April, 2012
Posted by shrevestan on Thursday, December 27, 2012 12:44 PM

Hi Aaron,

I'll answer what I can, but Poppa Chris on here has your scope and just recently got an autoguider, so he'll be able to give you specific answers.

Couple of things.

I think some software might be able to guide on alt-az, but the most common, PHD, does not. If you want to really get into DSO photography, you will need a wedge.

You can use the stock finderscope but the results won't be as good as an 80mm scope if you are shooting at f/10 due to the huge difference in field of view and the relatively poor optics on the finderscope.  

I use the Orion StarShoot Autoguider and it works great. You can get it with an 80mm scope for 400 but you may need additional rails, or you can get the mini package for 350 that will mount in the finder bracket. I've got a buddy that uses it and it works well.

___

Stan

http://www.astrobin.com/users/shrevestan/
Celestron 1100HD CGEM DX, ADM Rail, Rings and Knobs, Hyperstar 3, Optec .62X FR
8mm Ultima-LX, 23 mm Axiom LX, 28 mm RKE
Astronimic EOS 12nm Ha, OIII, SII, UV-IR, Baader L Booster UHC-S,Astrozap Solar Filter,  
Orion StarShoot AutoGuider in 80mm Refractor
Full Spectrum Canon XSi, Unmodded Canon T1i
BYEOS, DSS, Registax, Adobe CS 6 with Carboni Actions and GradientXterminator
SkyShed POD 

  • Member since
    December, 2012
Posted by Protiss on Thursday, December 27, 2012 1:29 PM

Ok great.  I think the biggest benefit of the Celestron autoguider is that it doesn't require a PC connection, or special software... You just mount it in a scope, point it, and lock on.  It's looking like that's the way I'm going to need to go.  I just need to make sure it'll handle RA and DEC (Celestron debuted it with the CPC 1100 Edge HD, which has an EQ mount, so it may only correct in RA, in which case I'd need the wedge).  I think before I worry about this though, I'm going to get the cheapo 2" EPs, a 99% dielectric diagonal and a focal reducer/flattener.  That way I can at least get the wider FOV, and I can pick up nicer EPs one at a time.  I think it may be possible to use a splitter with the autoguider initially, and then get the scope later.  I'm not a bajillionaire so I'm going to have to put everything together piece-wise hehe.  But I would like to get at least the basics knocked out.

--- Aaron ---

Celestron CPC 1100 (XLT) F10 - 6.3, HD Pro Equatorial Wedge, 2" SWA EPs (26, 32, 38mm, 70deg FOV)

Orion Awesome Autoguider - 80mm short-tube, StarShoot Autoguider

Canon EOS T3i DSLR, BackyardEOS, Deep Sky Stacker, Registax v6, Adobe Photoshop CS6

  • Member since
    November, 2009
Posted by Poppa Chris on Thursday, December 27, 2012 2:26 PM

OK...  I also have a CPC1100 So here is my take.

A:  Yes.  You can take pics of DSOs with your Alt-Az mount.  The problem is that exposure duration is limited due to field rotation.  The duration can be anywhere from 15 seconds to 60 seconds before this is a problem depending upon two factors, 1) your latitude 2) the position of the target in the sky.  I'm at 30degs North.  If I shoot a target within 15 degrees of the celestial equator and no more than 30 degrees above the horizon, I do just fine for up to 60 secs.  If I try a target closer to the N pole or the Zenith that time falls off dramatically.  Typically I shoot a maximum of 30 seconds for most targets in Alt-Az.

B: Yes. The Orion Star Shoot Autoguider will contrtol your mount in Alt-Az even with PHD guiding, however it still will not remove field rotation.  If you limit to under 45 secs to a minute as mentioned above, what you will get is better short duration photos than before.  If you go longer stars trails will reappear.

C:  There is no possible way to use your finder as a guide scope.  The finder has a dedeicated eyepiece that is a lot smaller than 1-1/4" and can not be replaced with any autoguider. But you can use an off-axis guider.  (see below)    

D:  For equitorial polar alignments to do long exposure photography you will need to be alble to tilt the scope to the angle of your latitude.  Although I have seen a few well-made home brew setups, most people opt for a wedge (see below)

The wedge will let you accurately align with celestial north.  Then the autoguider will keep you within a pixel or two of perfect during long shots of many minutes duration.

E:  Even shorter shots where the field has rotated but the stars have not trailed are still useful.  "Deep Sky Stacker" (freeware) will de-rotate them for you while stacking them to improve signal to noise ratio.  Stacking lets you use higher ISOs while cancelling out some of the noise that will be picked up that way.  Photoshop will take care of everything else.

Lastly:  All of this is really for deep space photos.  You can do fabulous planetary photography unguided in Alt-Az with a simple webcam setup and "Registax" (freeware).  Astrophotography has a long term learning curve and requires a commitment of time, talent, and treasure ($$$).  But you can take it one step at a time and build up the equipment as you master each step and are ready to move on.  A good way to start is with a good book like Michael A. Covington's "Digital SLR Astrophotography" - part of the Practical Amateur Astronomy series of books.

When things look bleak or you just have questions, the Four Horsemen of the Night (Shrevestan, RayM506, Slick750, and Poppa-Chris" are always right here on the forum ready to answer.

PS:  As a reference of what you can do right now this is an unguided shot of M-42 in Alt-Az mode, 4 frames of 15 seconds at ISO 800 with scope at normal f/10 (no focal reducer) stacked with Deep Sky Stacker and tweaked in Photoshop.  Things only get better as you grow...

 

 

---Poppa Chris---

Denham Springs, Louisiana USA

"Second star to the right - Then straight on until morning!" - Peter Pan

Celestron CPC1100GPS (XLT) - 279mm aperature, 2800mm Focal length. (f10) Celestron Ultima LX (70deg AFOV) Eyepieces 32mm thru 5mm, Canon EOS Rebel T2i DSLR, Backyard EOS imaging software, Orion Star Shoot Planetary Imager IV, Celestron Skymaster 15x70 binoculars

 

  • Member since
    December, 2012
Posted by Protiss on Thursday, December 27, 2012 5:34 PM

Great advice & pic, can't wait for the weather to improve.  Texas has been terrible for the last week or so.

Got a reducer and 2" prism on order today, so a few more pieces are in place :)

Need to look at an OAG next.  I think that'll be much more economical than the Celestron 80mm scope with NexGuide.

--- Aaron ---

Celestron CPC 1100 (XLT) F10 - 6.3, HD Pro Equatorial Wedge, 2" SWA EPs (26, 32, 38mm, 70deg FOV)

Orion Awesome Autoguider - 80mm short-tube, StarShoot Autoguider

Canon EOS T3i DSLR, BackyardEOS, Deep Sky Stacker, Registax v6, Adobe Photoshop CS6

  • Member since
    November, 2009
Posted by Poppa Chris on Thursday, December 27, 2012 5:47 PM

Of course the weather has been terrible.  it's the "New Equiipment Curse" of amateur astronomers.  Usually for something mundane, like a special new filter or eyepiece, it's only for a couple of nights when it would have been really convenient for you.  But for a whole new fairly expensive rig like a CPC-1100 it can stretch into several weeks!!!  Tongue Tied

But never fear, you will find plenty to keep you occupied (reading, researching, etc.) until the curse runs its course.  Big Smile

---Poppa Chris---

Denham Springs, Louisiana USA

"Second star to the right - Then straight on until morning!" - Peter Pan

Celestron CPC1100GPS (XLT) - 279mm aperature, 2800mm Focal length. (f10) Celestron Ultima LX (70deg AFOV) Eyepieces 32mm thru 5mm, Canon EOS Rebel T2i DSLR, Backyard EOS imaging software, Orion Star Shoot Planetary Imager IV, Celestron Skymaster 15x70 binoculars

 

  • Member since
    September, 2011
Posted by RayM0506 on Thursday, December 27, 2012 5:47 PM

Protiss

Great advice & pic, can't wait for the weather to improve.  Texas has been terrible for the last week or so.

Got a reducer and 2" prism on order today, so a few more pieces are in place :)

Need to look at an OAG next.  I think that'll be much more economical than the Celestron 80mm scope with NexGuide.

I use the Orion Shortube 80mm and it works fantastic with the Nexguide.  Not sure what the price for the Celestron is, but shop around.  The Orion Shortube was just at about $130.00.  The nexguide is a fantastic guider.  I swear by it!  If you get it up and running.  Let me know if you have any problems.  I have wrangled that beast several times and have it up and running great now.  Have guided all the way up to  10 minutes and could have gone longer.  I am using a G-GEM mount though.  Good luck!

Celestron 8 SCT F/10 to 7.5 to 6.3-C-GEM Mount-Starizona Power Pack II+-Bahatinov Focus Mask-Canon 60Da-Nexguide Auto Guider-Orion Short Tube 80mm Guide Scope- Baader Planetarium UHC-S/L-Booster visual/photographic 2"-Capture Software Backyard EOS-Deep Sky Stacker-Adobe Photoshop/Registax 6 for post work

  • Member since
    November, 2009
Posted by Poppa Chris on Thursday, December 27, 2012 10:03 PM

FYI:  The Celestron 94176 Radial Off-axis Guider shown in my picture with the DSLR and the autoguide camera connected to it, was discontinued by Celestron earlier in 2012.  But there are still plenty of them, both new and used, on the market if you hunt around a  little.  In fact, I bought mine used on Ebay for $25.00.  A new one from a regular retail outlet would run $100+.  I read somewhere that it was actually manufactured by the german company Baader under contract to Celestron.  I beleive Baader still offers one under its own logo.  As with most SCT accessories, the manufacturer often doesn't matter that much as they are all pretty interchangeable.  So don't be shy about doing your shopping for a good deal.  With patience, you can save a ton of money.

---Poppa Chris---

Denham Springs, Louisiana USA

"Second star to the right - Then straight on until morning!" - Peter Pan

Celestron CPC1100GPS (XLT) - 279mm aperature, 2800mm Focal length. (f10) Celestron Ultima LX (70deg AFOV) Eyepieces 32mm thru 5mm, Canon EOS Rebel T2i DSLR, Backyard EOS imaging software, Orion Star Shoot Planetary Imager IV, Celestron Skymaster 15x70 binoculars

 

  • Member since
    December, 2012
Posted by Protiss on Saturday, December 29, 2012 11:33 AM

Thanks for all the info, guys.  I'm thinking about potentially trying the Orion, just because of price.  I know it needs a PC and software (the downside), but it's just so much cheaper, and seems to be more sensitive, based on specs. www.telescope.com/.../99631.uts is the one I'm looking at.  It's $349.99 (and I'm sure amazon or ebay will have it for less), has sub-pixel accuracy (the NexGuide supposedly does not, on a 2800mm scope the reviews said something like 8 pixel accuracy, which can potentially lead to streaking, especially since I don't have a GEQ mount).  Price is obviously the other issue.  NexGuide is ~$250, the scope with rings is ~$165, and the dovetail for an 11" is about ~$40.  So even if their performance is the same, it's still around ~$100 cheaper to go with the Orion solution.  I don't know that 1 less connection to my PC is worth $100.. I still have to have my PC for BackyardEOS and other software, so it's not like it really saves anything but a wire or 2.

Just what I'm seeing from reviews - people seem to either love or hate the NexGuide.  Most of the StarShoot reviews seem positive...

But, that's why we're here :)  If anyone has any recommendations, please share.. I think Poppa Chris uses the Orion and said it seems to work great on short-aperature pics (<1 min) even without the EQ wedge.  I'll probably be buying in the 1st or 2nd week of Jan, so we have plenty of debate time :)  I'll obviously be researching as much as possible as well hehe.  I need to get something though, I'm not sure if I did something wrong, but I had star streaking on a 30 sec exposure (Tried M42) on my alt-az, which sort of surprised me.. not that I had any - I expected a small bit, but at how bad it was.. I need to find some kind of solution.

I'm sure the wedge will be my next purchase after the autoguider, since I've already taken care of my diagonal and focal reducer.

--- Aaron ---

Celestron CPC 1100 (XLT) F10 - 6.3, HD Pro Equatorial Wedge, 2" SWA EPs (26, 32, 38mm, 70deg FOV)

Orion Awesome Autoguider - 80mm short-tube, StarShoot Autoguider

Canon EOS T3i DSLR, BackyardEOS, Deep Sky Stacker, Registax v6, Adobe Photoshop CS6

  • Member since
    April, 2012
Posted by shrevestan on Saturday, December 29, 2012 12:38 PM

I use the Orion with the 80mm scope (www.telescope.com/.../24770.uts) . I don't see having a PC as a negative since you'll have it out anyway.

I did have to buy an additional rail to mount the 80mm scope since the one that came with it didn't fit. I went with ADM (admaccessories.com/MDS_guidescope_kit.htm)

Only other accessory I would recommend is the Hyperstar from Starizona. It's pricey but it gives you a wide enough FOV to get Andromeda and Orion and some other larger targets. Plus you can get amazing pictures with 30 second exposures.

___

Stan

http://www.astrobin.com/users/shrevestan/
Celestron 1100HD CGEM DX, ADM Rail, Rings and Knobs, Hyperstar 3, Optec .62X FR
8mm Ultima-LX, 23 mm Axiom LX, 28 mm RKE
Astronimic EOS 12nm Ha, OIII, SII, UV-IR, Baader L Booster UHC-S,Astrozap Solar Filter,  
Orion StarShoot AutoGuider in 80mm Refractor
Full Spectrum Canon XSi, Unmodded Canon T1i
BYEOS, DSS, Registax, Adobe CS 6 with Carboni Actions and GradientXterminator
SkyShed POD 

  • Member since
    November, 2009
Posted by Poppa Chris on Saturday, December 29, 2012 2:49 PM

That wedge will set you back another $400 or so...  The Alt-Az setup is limited to 15 - 30 seconds if you aren't shooting near the clestial equator and lower in the sky than about 40 degrees.  Anything significantly higher or further north will shorten the time without trailing stars. (I learned this the hard way.) With guiding you can better this to 30-45 seconds OR you can shoot higher and "norther" Geeked (like my new word?) for the same 15 to 30 secs.  It is the wedge that will make the difference, even more so than the autoguider.  But of course, you want the combination of the two... Big Smile

 

---Poppa Chris---

Denham Springs, Louisiana USA

"Second star to the right - Then straight on until morning!" - Peter Pan

Celestron CPC1100GPS (XLT) - 279mm aperature, 2800mm Focal length. (f10) Celestron Ultima LX (70deg AFOV) Eyepieces 32mm thru 5mm, Canon EOS Rebel T2i DSLR, Backyard EOS imaging software, Orion Star Shoot Planetary Imager IV, Celestron Skymaster 15x70 binoculars

 

  • Member since
    December, 2012
Posted by Protiss on Saturday, December 29, 2012 5:32 PM

Yeah, I'm going to look at the wedge next.  I think I've done pretty good though.  Had it for 2 weeks and already have a 2" diagonal, focal reducer, 3 good EPs, a cruddy EP/filter starter kit.. and shortly an autoguider :)

PS - norther is a great word :)

--- Aaron ---

Celestron CPC 1100 (XLT) F10 - 6.3, HD Pro Equatorial Wedge, 2" SWA EPs (26, 32, 38mm, 70deg FOV)

Orion Awesome Autoguider - 80mm short-tube, StarShoot Autoguider

Canon EOS T3i DSLR, BackyardEOS, Deep Sky Stacker, Registax v6, Adobe Photoshop CS6

  • Member since
    November, 2009
Posted by Poppa Chris on Saturday, December 29, 2012 9:52 PM

Don't knock that "cruddy" EP filter kit too much.  They are actually serviceable eyepieces that will get you through the interim period while you are aquiring the more expensive premium accessories you wish.  Plus the filters are the same anyway, so they won't need replacement. 

A mistake many make is that only the "best of the best" is worth owning.  If that were true the number of amateur astronomers would be far lower than it currently is.  While we all want the best quality there is, sometimes we must settle for the best quality we can afford.  If you are truly committed to this hobby, you must recognize that it is a long term commitment.  At advanced levels, equiping yourself can get quite expensive.  Often, your scope is actually a lesser part of your investment representing only 30% or so of the full amount when you account for EPs, filters, cameras, laptop, power supplies, software, misc. accessories, etc., etc., etc. To think you can make these decisions all at one time without a little experience to back up your decisions is to set yourself up for some bitter and expensive disappointments.  

---Poppa Chris---

Denham Springs, Louisiana USA

"Second star to the right - Then straight on until morning!" - Peter Pan

Celestron CPC1100GPS (XLT) - 279mm aperature, 2800mm Focal length. (f10) Celestron Ultima LX (70deg AFOV) Eyepieces 32mm thru 5mm, Canon EOS Rebel T2i DSLR, Backyard EOS imaging software, Orion Star Shoot Planetary Imager IV, Celestron Skymaster 15x70 binoculars

 

  • Member since
    December, 2012
Posted by Protiss on Sunday, December 30, 2012 10:32 AM

I can definitely see that the scope itself is not the biggest monetary commitment.  Other stuff for sure adds up, as I'm learning very quickly :)   Sorry if I made it seem like I don't appreciate the EPs, I wasn't trying to say they were worthless, just that the kits have a lower quality than the individual EPs.  Experience through trial and error and learning from others experiences is for sure going to play a huge part in this, which is why I'm asking so many questions on here :)  When I first started, I had a Celestron 130EQ (now my daughter's), so I went with the 1 1/4" kit.  Because I have that one though, I can't really justify buying the 2" kit, especially since it comes with a diagonal, which I already purchased.  That's why I went with 3 EPs from Agena for larger mm lenses.  I figure for now I can just use the 1 1/4 adapter for my 6-20mm's.  So for sure the 1 1/4 kit is helping during the interim while I collect other basics.  And once I have all those basics, I'm sure I'll slowly improve upon them..

Sorry if I sounded unappreciative, I'm absolutely not.

--- Aaron ---

Celestron CPC 1100 (XLT) F10 - 6.3, HD Pro Equatorial Wedge, 2" SWA EPs (26, 32, 38mm, 70deg FOV)

Orion Awesome Autoguider - 80mm short-tube, StarShoot Autoguider

Canon EOS T3i DSLR, BackyardEOS, Deep Sky Stacker, Registax v6, Adobe Photoshop CS6

  • Member since
    November, 2009
Posted by Poppa Chris on Sunday, December 30, 2012 4:38 PM

You didn't sound unappreciative at all, so no apology needed.  The 3 larger EP's are just fine since the shorter FL EPs with 2" barrels use 1-1/4" lenses anyway.  But they are all parfocal with each other within the series.  FOr hig magnification planetary viewing I get the most use out of my 8mm, 13mm, and 17mm.  The 5mm is only useful on nights of exceptional seeing.  But when that occurs, I'm almost always imaging instead of viewing.  

---Poppa Chris---

Denham Springs, Louisiana USA

"Second star to the right - Then straight on until morning!" - Peter Pan

Celestron CPC1100GPS (XLT) - 279mm aperature, 2800mm Focal length. (f10) Celestron Ultima LX (70deg AFOV) Eyepieces 32mm thru 5mm, Canon EOS Rebel T2i DSLR, Backyard EOS imaging software, Orion Star Shoot Planetary Imager IV, Celestron Skymaster 15x70 binoculars

 

  • Member since
    November, 2009
Posted by Poppa Chris on Sunday, December 30, 2012 5:08 PM

This may be helpful to you as a comparison only for what you can expect.  It is a listing of my own EP collection for my CPC1100. With the exception of the Orion reticle it is 6 EPs, a 2X barlow, and a 0.63 focal reducer.

Eyepieces are all 70 deg AFOV - Parfocal within the series

MAG    EP       F/# Barlow   TFOV   exit pup   Eye R   series         barrel   Filter

88X     32mm    10   -           0.80     3.20        16mm   Ultima LX     2"        2"

127X   22mm   10    -           0.55     2.20        16mm   Ultima LX     2"        2"

165X   17mm   10    -           0.43     1.70        16mm   Ultima LX     2"        1.25"

215X   13mm   10    -           0.33     1.30        16mm   Ultima LX     2"        1.25"

350X    8mm     10   -           0.20     0.80        16mm   Ultima LX     2"        1.25"

560X    5mm     10   -           0.13     0.50        16mm   Ultima LX     2"        1.25"

140X   20mm   10    -           0.51     2.00        17mm   Orion reticle 1.25"   1.25"

175X   32mm   10    2x        0.40     1.60        16mm   Ultima LX     2"        2"

255X   22mm   10    2x        0.28     1.10        16mm   Ultima LX     2"        2"

329X   17mm   10    2x        0.21     0.85        16mm   Ultima LX     2"        1.25"

431X   13mm   10    2x        0.16     0.65        16mm   Ultima LX     2"        1.25"

700X    8mm    10    2x        0.10     0.40        16mm   Ultima LX     2"        1.25"

1120X  5mm    10    2x        0.06     0.25        16mm   Ultima LX     2"        1.25"

280X  20mm    10    2x        0.26     1.00        17mm   Orion reticle 1.25"   1.25"

55X    32mm    6.3    -         1.27      5.08        16mm   Ultima LX     2"        2"

80X    22mm    6.3    -          0.87     3.49        16mm   Ultima LX     2"        2"

104X  17mm    6.3    -          0.67     2.70        16mm   Ultima LX     2"        1.25"

136X  13mm    6.3    -          0.52     2.06        16mm   Ultima LX     2"        1.25"

221X    8mm    6.3    -          0.32     1.27        16mm   Ultima LX     2"        1.25"

353X    5mm    6.3    -          0.20     0.79        16mm   Ultima LX     2"        1.25"

88X     20mm   6.3    -          0.82     3.17        17mm  Orion reticle  1.25"   1.25"

110X   32mm   6.3   2x        0.63     2.54        16mm   Ultima LX      2"        2"

160X   22mm   6.3   2x        0.44     1.75        16mm   Ultima LX      2"        2"

208X   17mm   6.3   2x        0.34     1.35        16mm   Ultima LX      2"        1.25"

271X   13mm   6.3   2x        0.26     1.03        16mm   Ultima LX      2"        1.25"

441X     8mm   6.3   2x        0.16     0.63        16mm   Ultima LX      2"        1.25"

706X     5mm   6.3   2x        0.10     0.40        16mm   Ultima LX      2"        1.25"

176X   20mm   6.3   2x        0.41     1.59        17mm   Orion reticle  1.25"   1.25"

---Poppa Chris---

Denham Springs, Louisiana USA

"Second star to the right - Then straight on until morning!" - Peter Pan

Celestron CPC1100GPS (XLT) - 279mm aperature, 2800mm Focal length. (f10) Celestron Ultima LX (70deg AFOV) Eyepieces 32mm thru 5mm, Canon EOS Rebel T2i DSLR, Backyard EOS imaging software, Orion Star Shoot Planetary Imager IV, Celestron Skymaster 15x70 binoculars

 

  • Member since
    December, 2012
Posted by Protiss on Sunday, December 30, 2012 8:05 PM

Thanks Poppa Chris.  So you think I should get the wedge before the autoguider?  I think both are truly necessary for absolutely accurate photos, but you think the benefit is better with the wedge than the autoguider?  The main reason I ask is they're basically the same price.  Wedge is 369.99 and the 50mm orion kit is 399.99.. So if it's more beneficial to polar align first, and autoguide second, I can probably do that.  At the end of the day I'm going to need both anyway, so I guess if there's more benefit, I should get the wedge first (I already know how to polar align, my first scope was a 130EQ with the optional RA drive, I had to figure it out for that).

--- Aaron ---

Celestron CPC 1100 (XLT) F10 - 6.3, HD Pro Equatorial Wedge, 2" SWA EPs (26, 32, 38mm, 70deg FOV)

Orion Awesome Autoguider - 80mm short-tube, StarShoot Autoguider

Canon EOS T3i DSLR, BackyardEOS, Deep Sky Stacker, Registax v6, Adobe Photoshop CS6

  • Member since
    April, 2012
Posted by shrevestan on Sunday, December 30, 2012 8:17 PM

I think a wedge would be better. You still aren't going to be able to get long exposures without field rotation even with an autoguider without the wedge.

___

Stan

http://www.astrobin.com/users/shrevestan/
Celestron 1100HD CGEM DX, ADM Rail, Rings and Knobs, Hyperstar 3, Optec .62X FR
8mm Ultima-LX, 23 mm Axiom LX, 28 mm RKE
Astronimic EOS 12nm Ha, OIII, SII, UV-IR, Baader L Booster UHC-S,Astrozap Solar Filter,  
Orion StarShoot AutoGuider in 80mm Refractor
Full Spectrum Canon XSi, Unmodded Canon T1i
BYEOS, DSS, Registax, Adobe CS 6 with Carboni Actions and GradientXterminator
SkyShed POD 

  • Member since
    December, 2012
Posted by Protiss on Sunday, December 30, 2012 10:33 PM

well that seems to be you and Poppa Chris, that's good enough for me :)  Guess I'll get the wedge next!

--- Aaron ---

Celestron CPC 1100 (XLT) F10 - 6.3, HD Pro Equatorial Wedge, 2" SWA EPs (26, 32, 38mm, 70deg FOV)

Orion Awesome Autoguider - 80mm short-tube, StarShoot Autoguider

Canon EOS T3i DSLR, BackyardEOS, Deep Sky Stacker, Registax v6, Adobe Photoshop CS6

  • Member since
    November, 2009
Posted by Poppa Chris on Monday, December 31, 2012 8:25 AM

Yes!  The wedge first.  Then the guiding setup.

FYI:  The 50mm "Mini" guide scope is only suitable for main instruments up to 1500mm focal length.  Your CPC1100 is a 2800mm focal length.  The "short tube" 80mm would be a much better match for your big light bucket.

Or you could go with the off-axis guider I mentioned earlier and showed in my photos.

---Poppa Chris---

Denham Springs, Louisiana USA

"Second star to the right - Then straight on until morning!" - Peter Pan

Celestron CPC1100GPS (XLT) - 279mm aperature, 2800mm Focal length. (f10) Celestron Ultima LX (70deg AFOV) Eyepieces 32mm thru 5mm, Canon EOS Rebel T2i DSLR, Backyard EOS imaging software, Orion Star Shoot Planetary Imager IV, Celestron Skymaster 15x70 binoculars

 

  • Member since
    December, 2012
Posted by Protiss on Monday, December 31, 2012 10:32 AM

Ehh, then we start getting expensive again lol.  Might just do off-axis with the StarShoot in that case.  Thought I was being smart b/c of the 6.3 reducer, but I just did the math and I guess even with that it's still 1700+

--- Aaron ---

Celestron CPC 1100 (XLT) F10 - 6.3, HD Pro Equatorial Wedge, 2" SWA EPs (26, 32, 38mm, 70deg FOV)

Orion Awesome Autoguider - 80mm short-tube, StarShoot Autoguider

Canon EOS T3i DSLR, BackyardEOS, Deep Sky Stacker, Registax v6, Adobe Photoshop CS6

  • Member since
    December, 2012
Posted by Protiss on Saturday, January 05, 2013 11:38 AM

Well, my focal reducer, diagonal, and new EPs came in last night.  Why did nobody warn me how huge the EPs would be! Lol, they're absolutely huge.  Still haven't been able to get out, it's been cloudy and rainy for the last 3 weeks now.  Hopefully tomorrow night - it's supposed to be "mostly clear."

Looking at ordering my wedge in the next day or 2 as well :)

--- Aaron ---

Celestron CPC 1100 (XLT) F10 - 6.3, HD Pro Equatorial Wedge, 2" SWA EPs (26, 32, 38mm, 70deg FOV)

Orion Awesome Autoguider - 80mm short-tube, StarShoot Autoguider

Canon EOS T3i DSLR, BackyardEOS, Deep Sky Stacker, Registax v6, Adobe Photoshop CS6

  • Member since
    December, 2010
Posted by tower3 on Saturday, January 05, 2013 12:50 PM

I guess we didn't warn you of the new gear curse either.

EASY DUDE, THERE WILL BE ANOTHER WAVE

From San Diego, Zhumell Z10 (Bubba is for all around observing)Telrad, Vixen VMC110L on a Porta Mount II,  Bushnell 10x50 (for beach) Garrett 10x50 classics (for Sylvia), Zhumell 80x20 on their Pro tripod(cuz they were cheap and sylvia digs 'em),  1.75 readers (so I can find the other stuff)

  • Member since
    November, 2009
Posted by Poppa Chris on Saturday, January 05, 2013 2:44 PM

Let's see.... Confused

New EP's = 2 weeks

New Diagonal = 1 week

New Focal reducer = 1 week

Credit for getting them all at one time = -1 week

That leaves a "Curse" balance of 3 weeks... Grumpy

Then comes the future:  Whistling

Wedge = 3 weeks

Autoguider = 3 weeks

Software = 4 weeks

BANK LOAN = 4 weeks

TOTAL CURSE = 17 weeks (4 months)  Laugh

 

---Poppa Chris---

Denham Springs, Louisiana USA

"Second star to the right - Then straight on until morning!" - Peter Pan

Celestron CPC1100GPS (XLT) - 279mm aperature, 2800mm Focal length. (f10) Celestron Ultima LX (70deg AFOV) Eyepieces 32mm thru 5mm, Canon EOS Rebel T2i DSLR, Backyard EOS imaging software, Orion Star Shoot Planetary Imager IV, Celestron Skymaster 15x70 binoculars

 

  • Member since
    December, 2012
Posted by Protiss on Saturday, January 05, 2013 5:09 PM

Not counting the telescope itself.  That's probably worth at least 4 weeks by itself :)

--- Aaron ---

Celestron CPC 1100 (XLT) F10 - 6.3, HD Pro Equatorial Wedge, 2" SWA EPs (26, 32, 38mm, 70deg FOV)

Orion Awesome Autoguider - 80mm short-tube, StarShoot Autoguider

Canon EOS T3i DSLR, BackyardEOS, Deep Sky Stacker, Registax v6, Adobe Photoshop CS6

  • Member since
    April, 2012
Posted by shrevestan on Sunday, January 06, 2013 10:51 AM

Haha, I had the exact same reaction when I got my first big eyepiece. I was expecting the tiny Plossl style. Hope it clears out soon. We might have a patch of clear tonight.

___

Stan

http://www.astrobin.com/users/shrevestan/
Celestron 1100HD CGEM DX, ADM Rail, Rings and Knobs, Hyperstar 3, Optec .62X FR
8mm Ultima-LX, 23 mm Axiom LX, 28 mm RKE
Astronimic EOS 12nm Ha, OIII, SII, UV-IR, Baader L Booster UHC-S,Astrozap Solar Filter,  
Orion StarShoot AutoGuider in 80mm Refractor
Full Spectrum Canon XSi, Unmodded Canon T1i
BYEOS, DSS, Registax, Adobe CS 6 with Carboni Actions and GradientXterminator
SkyShed POD 

  • Member since
    December, 2012
Posted by Protiss on Sunday, January 06, 2013 8:00 PM

Got my first nebula shots.  Took a few at 6400 and a few at 800.  I know 6400 inserts a lot of noise, but man, you get so much more detail lol.  I'm running my sets through deep sky stacker right now, so we'll see what we get!  I'm pretty excited, the raw images seem pretty good.  Not too much streaking.

--- Aaron ---

Celestron CPC 1100 (XLT) F10 - 6.3, HD Pro Equatorial Wedge, 2" SWA EPs (26, 32, 38mm, 70deg FOV)

Orion Awesome Autoguider - 80mm short-tube, StarShoot Autoguider

Canon EOS T3i DSLR, BackyardEOS, Deep Sky Stacker, Registax v6, Adobe Photoshop CS6

  • Member since
    December, 2012
Posted by Protiss on Wednesday, January 09, 2013 11:47 AM

Well guys, I had a pretty fantastic set of events happen.  My mom decided she wanted to get me a big Christmas present this year, so she opted to refund my wedge money.. The Orion Awesome autoguider package is on sale right now for $20 off, so the wedge money completely covered the autoguider.. It's raining for at least the next 5 days (I think earlier we decided I'm screwed for the next 4-6 months anyway), but by the time it's clear again, I should be able to test everything out as a complete rig.

--- Aaron ---

Celestron CPC 1100 (XLT) F10 - 6.3, HD Pro Equatorial Wedge, 2" SWA EPs (26, 32, 38mm, 70deg FOV)

Orion Awesome Autoguider - 80mm short-tube, StarShoot Autoguider

Canon EOS T3i DSLR, BackyardEOS, Deep Sky Stacker, Registax v6, Adobe Photoshop CS6

  • Member since
    April, 2012
Posted by shrevestan on Wednesday, January 09, 2013 11:55 AM

Awesome! Can't wait to see what you come up with! I don't think it's ever going to stop raining here.

___

Stan

http://www.astrobin.com/users/shrevestan/
Celestron 1100HD CGEM DX, ADM Rail, Rings and Knobs, Hyperstar 3, Optec .62X FR
8mm Ultima-LX, 23 mm Axiom LX, 28 mm RKE
Astronimic EOS 12nm Ha, OIII, SII, UV-IR, Baader L Booster UHC-S,Astrozap Solar Filter,  
Orion StarShoot AutoGuider in 80mm Refractor
Full Spectrum Canon XSi, Unmodded Canon T1i
BYEOS, DSS, Registax, Adobe CS 6 with Carboni Actions and GradientXterminator
SkyShed POD 

  • Member since
    December, 2012
Posted by Protiss on Wednesday, January 09, 2013 12:05 PM

Are you in Texas too Stan?  It's been a nightmare since before Christmas.  I fully understand it's my fault for buying so much new equipment, so if you are near me, my apologies for screwing up your clear nights :)

--- Aaron ---

Celestron CPC 1100 (XLT) F10 - 6.3, HD Pro Equatorial Wedge, 2" SWA EPs (26, 32, 38mm, 70deg FOV)

Orion Awesome Autoguider - 80mm short-tube, StarShoot Autoguider

Canon EOS T3i DSLR, BackyardEOS, Deep Sky Stacker, Registax v6, Adobe Photoshop CS6

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