What flew in front of my Orion Nebula M42 pic?

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  • Member since
    December, 2013
What flew in front of my Orion Nebula M42 pic?
Posted by GarnerSkyGazer213 on Tuesday, December 10, 2013 7:26 PM

Hey guys First post.

 

I wanted to see if anyone could tell me what went across the my frame of the Nebula.

I have a series of 3 Photos back to back with 30 sec exposure and you can see 4 items

Frame 1 enter the top right.

Frame2 Somthing Flying through the middle on the frame

Orion Nebula M42 with space rocksM42 Orion Nebula with Space rocks 2

Tags: M42 , Nebula , Orion , space rocks
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  • Member since
    July, 2002
  • From: Texas
Posted by chipdatajeffB on Tuesday, December 10, 2013 9:58 PM

Near as I can make out, more than one object in Earth orbit, but I would need more info to help more:

When were these images made (date and time)? ... for starters ...

The universe is not only stranger than we imagine, it's stranger than we CAN imagine. --- JBS Haldane

Come visit me at Comanche Springs Astronomy Campus (we're on Google Maps) in Texas.

www.3rf.org

  • Member since
    December, 2013
Posted by GarnerSkyGazer213 on Thursday, December 12, 2013 6:10 PM

Whoops I guess that would be helpful. Smile

I was in Garner NC just South of Raleigh NC

11/10/2013 10:22 - 10:23 PM 

30 Second Exposure with Nikon D5100 IS03200

 

Thanks for the reply.

 

 

Tags: Raleigh
  • Member since
    October, 2007
Posted by Aratus on Friday, December 13, 2013 11:58 AM

I can't identify any major satellite etc in that area at that time.   It does look like an object that has broken up into several parts but is still travelling in a parallel orbit.   It is likely that it has disintegrated rather than been struck.    It is a very interesting capture, even if it has spoilt the shot!Smile

Aratus

Location:  North West Devon, UK

-------------------------------------------------

Celestron Nexstar8i (8" SCT).

Celestron Skymaster binoculars 15x70

Other:0.63 & 0.33 correctors. X2 & X4 barlow.

Imagers: Meade DSI & Celestron NexImage.  Canon EOS 550D

 

 

  • Member since
    December, 2013
Posted by GarnerSkyGazer213 on Friday, December 13, 2013 1:09 PM

Thanks for the info.

Then I  shall name it "Space Rock Garner:2013"

 

I have the RAW file.

I want to tweak with it and see if I can bring them out a little more.

I'm just getting into the post processing of astrophotography so if any one wants to play with the Raw file

Let me know and I'll post a link.

 

 

  • Member since
    September, 2009
  • From: Franklin, Tennessee, USA
Posted by Tennessee Skies on Friday, December 13, 2013 1:23 PM

I have experienced this before imaging in this area of the sky.

I rarely image this area and not capture at least two (2) satellites.

They normally reveal themselves as a short trail through a frame.

I think you have captured geosynchronous satellites. 

Tom

 

 

  • Member since
    August, 2010
Posted by PeakOilBill on Saturday, December 14, 2013 1:17 AM

One of the several thousand satellites and rocket parts now in Earth orbit. Point some binoculars with 100mm front lenses at any point in the sky, and within a few minutes, you will see something cross the field of view. They are launching something nearly every week now, sometimes a few a week. 

None.

  • Member since
    October, 2007
Posted by Aratus on Saturday, December 14, 2013 11:44 AM

Tennessee Skies

I think you have captured geosynchronous satellites. 

 

By definition a geosynchronous satellite would appear stationary in the sky.  It wouldn't produce a a trail.  It is possible that these trails are the remains of a rocket stage rather than a bona fide satellite.

Aratus

Location:  North West Devon, UK

-------------------------------------------------

Celestron Nexstar8i (8" SCT).

Celestron Skymaster binoculars 15x70

Other:0.63 & 0.33 correctors. X2 & X4 barlow.

Imagers: Meade DSI & Celestron NexImage.  Canon EOS 550D

 

 

  • Member since
    September, 2009
  • From: Franklin, Tennessee, USA
Posted by Tennessee Skies on Saturday, December 14, 2013 4:58 PM

 The fact that with a 30 sec. exposure with a field of view I guessing to be no more than 1 degrees the trail would have been across the full frame of the image for any non geosynchronous object.

What you have are short trails over about a third of the frame.

These type of trails are made only by geosynchronous objects.

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  • Member since
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  • From: PA, USA, Earth Moderator
Posted by DaveMitsky on Sunday, December 15, 2013 3:51 AM

Aratus is wrong.  There have been many Internet discussions about and posted images of geosats in the area of Orion.

http://twanight.org/newTWAN/case.asp

http://apod.nasa.gov/apod/ap100220.html

http://www.astral-imaging.com/OrionRegion.htm

http://www.pbase.com/missouri_skies/image/56504057 

http://www.mistisoftware.com/astronomy/FSQ106_GeoSynSat.htm

Should you wonder why the satellites leave trails even though they appear stationary in the sky, the reason is that the telescope and camera are moving (tracking) to keep up with the rotation of the night sky, a consequence of the earth's rotation. The satellites trail in the photograph because the telescope sweeps past them during its exposure.

http://www.ericchesak.com/Galleries/Astro-Images/Satellites/i-cfB9msD

http://www.astronomyforum.net/astro-imaging-forum/145713-geostationary-satellites.html

It IS possible to capture Geostationary Satellites in your AP Images. But as you are mounted on a Tracking Mount - even if "only" a Barndoor Tracker - those GS Sats should actually appear as moderately bright straight and thin streaks across your image. This is because your tracker IS working to counter the Earth's rotation - which will make those "stationary" points move across your image.

Most GS Sats are in Equatorial Orbits, so they are quite often "caught" in images of DSOs along the Equatorial Plane - Orion is NOTORIOUS for this, with GS Sat tracks "ruining" a large number of otherwise usable sub images.ng the Equatorial Plane - Orion is NOTORIOUS for this, with GS Sat tracks "ruining" a large number of otherwise usable sub images...

Apparently, geosat tracks can be by removed from images using sigma-kappa, min/max exclusion, or median stacking.

Dave Mitsky

 

Sic itur ad astra!

Chance favors the prepared mind.

A man is a small thing, and the night is very large and full of wonders.

  • Member since
    October, 2007
Posted by Aratus on Sunday, December 15, 2013 4:18 AM

I'm right and wrong Smile

A geostationary object will remain in the same place in the sky, as I said, but of course if a telescope is tracking stars then the telescope itself will produce trails of a fixed object.   The earth is rotating along with the geostationary satellites, but the stars are not.   That is something I hadn't allowed for in my statement.  As always I am happy to be corrected.

This should make the identity of those satellite a lot easier.  

Aratus

Location:  North West Devon, UK

-------------------------------------------------

Celestron Nexstar8i (8" SCT).

Celestron Skymaster binoculars 15x70

Other:0.63 & 0.33 correctors. X2 & X4 barlow.

Imagers: Meade DSI & Celestron NexImage.  Canon EOS 550D

 

 

  • Member since
    January, 2013
Posted by EddieD on Thursday, January 16, 2014 8:44 PM

I came across something similar to that when I was observing the moon. I wasn't tracking and I had a large magnification, I used a 9mm. All of a sudden a round, mostly translucent, object went streaking across the field of view, taking up at least 20% of the field. It passed through quickly, within a fraction of a second, probably due to the magnification I was using. It left in its wake a distortion that I can only describe as the "heat" you can see on the surface of a road on a hot day. Unfortunately I wasn't doing any imaging. I think it was a satellite, probably in low earth orbit due to the distortion and wake left, also due to the speed at which it passed. Any thoughts?

  • Member since
    August, 2010
Posted by PeakOilBill on Thursday, January 16, 2014 11:16 PM

I just happened to be reading about beryllium last night on Wikipedia. The article notes that the USA uses the largest amount of the stuff, by far. And that high performance spacecraft and missiles are a major use. Some kind of experimental military space plane, or aircraft is certainly a possibility. The distortion you saw is from light near it being bent and distorted by the atmosphere. Wiki intimates that it is a mystery where most of the beryllium is going. Since it is very dangerous to use, normal industry can't be using it much, because of the liability they would incur. Nuclear weapons use a little, as do nuclear reactors, but there is no surge in their construction. A jet flying between you and the Sun, if viewed through a solar telescope leaves a very obvious heat trail behind it. The image of the jet isn't distorted though. I've seen a couple through a Coronado PST. Even happened to accidentally catch a solar flare one morning. They are a white hot spot even through the filtering. All of a sudden, a lot is going on with space. NASA just issued an RFP for transportation of commercial supplies to the Moon! Visit the NASA site for the details. And rumors are circulating about some massive aviation project possibly coming to either New Orleans, Jacksonville, or somewhere along the Georgia coast. But it is just a rumor at this time.    

None.

  • Member since
    October, 2007
Posted by Aratus on Thursday, January 23, 2014 12:34 PM

Can I repeat that the objects seen by the OP were not moving.  The telescope was moving along with the stars to account for the earth’s rotation, and that is what caused the fixed objects to trail.   Nothing actually ‘flew past’.    Consider how small those trails are in the time the photos were taken.  (A point I initially forgot to take into account.)

What is being described in the last couple of posts is not the same thing at all.

Aratus

Location:  North West Devon, UK

-------------------------------------------------

Celestron Nexstar8i (8" SCT).

Celestron Skymaster binoculars 15x70

Other:0.63 & 0.33 correctors. X2 & X4 barlow.

Imagers: Meade DSI & Celestron NexImage.  Canon EOS 550D

 

 

  • Member since
    August, 2004
Posted by stars4life on Thursday, January 23, 2014 9:06 PM

I've seen trails similar to those in some of my shots. I usually attribute them to aircraft. My 2 cents.

  • Member since
    December, 2006
Posted by Graviton on Thursday, January 23, 2014 9:44 PM

It's an aircraft.  What you're seeing is the navigational lights on the nose, tail, and wings.  The jet was too dark to affect to photo, but the brite points smeared across your frame.  And considering the frame exposure time (and field of view), it would put it at around 500+ MPH, right at aircraft speed.

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