Hiades and Pleiades

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  • Member since
    December, 2013
Hiades and Pleiades
Posted by Pepe Cuellar on Wednesday, December 04, 2013 4:45 PM

Hi all!

Last saturday I went to take some astrophotos after a 2 years hiatus in astrophotography due to personal problems. Well the night was horrible (clouds, a lot of humidity and wet equipment); I only could take 3x10mins. shots of these objects with a 50mm lens on my G11. Hope you like the shot and thanks for watching:

http://astrosurfer.jimdo.com/%C3%BAltima-foto/

Click on the small pictures to see it bigger.

Regards!

Pepe Cuellar.

  • Member since
    March, 2008
Posted by Antitax on Thursday, December 05, 2013 1:54 AM

   You also got NGC1647 to the lower left of Aldebaran, and some large dark dust streamer at the left of the frame. Your 50mm lens does not distort stars at the edges and corners, by the way, which is it?

EDIT: Never mind, I reread the page and saw the lens is a Sigma 18-50 zoom. You removed light pollution and chromatic aberration with filters.

TS 8x40 Wildlife, 10x50 Marine/Fujinon 16x70/TS 80mm triplet, 6x30 finder, EQ-3 mount, TS 2" 99% diagonal/Celestron C5+ and 6x30 finder, DIY tripod/5" Bahtinov/12" GSO dob, 8x50 finder/Meade 2" 24mm 82°/Hyperion 24,13,10mm 68°/TS Expanse 17mm 70°/SW 7mm Panorama 82°/Ultima 2x barlow/Astronomik UHC-E filter/Baader O-III/Astro Solar 5" & 80mm filters/Sky Atlas 2000/Rükl's Moon Atlas/Canon 400D/5mW green laser

  • Member since
    December, 2013
Posted by Pepe Cuellar on Thursday, December 05, 2013 10:49 AM

Hi Antitax!

I used a Sigma 18-50mm lens and used these filters to fight light pollution and chromatic aberration with very good results: DeepSky Lumicon + Baader Contrast Booster + Minus Violet 

BR.

Pepe.

 

 

 

 

  • Member since
    October, 2007
Posted by Aratus on Friday, December 06, 2013 6:28 AM

It is a very good photo, although I was initially puzzled because it is mirrored from what is normally seen with the eye, or through binoculars.   It is particularly good in that is shows the Hyades as a cluster, which is sometimes difficult to envisage.

Aratus

Location:  North West Devon, UK

-------------------------------------------------

Celestron Nexstar8i (8" SCT).

Celestron Skymaster binoculars 15x70

Other:0.63 & 0.33 correctors. X2 & X4 barlow.

Imagers: Meade DSI & Celestron NexImage.  Canon EOS 550D

 

 

  • Member since
    December, 2013
Posted by Pepe Cuellar on Friday, December 06, 2013 3:06 PM

Thanks Aratus for your comments!!!

It is not a mirrored problem, but on wich side of the sky (East or West) is the constellation; I took these shots when Taurus was rising on the East side of the sky, so the "V" shape is upsidedown. When the constellation is setting on the West side of the sky, the "V" shape is not inverted.

BR!

  • Member since
    October, 2007
Posted by Aratus on Friday, December 06, 2013 5:39 PM

Looking more closely I can see that the image is not mirrored.  Embarrassed    However the orientation is one I have never seen before.   I suspect that is due to my higher  latitude.   

EDIT: In fact I ran a few simulations on 'Starry Night' on a lower latitude and I was able reproduce your image.    Taurus and the Pleiades never appear like that to me.  

I knew something was different. Oops - Sign Smile

Aratus

Location:  North West Devon, UK

-------------------------------------------------

Celestron Nexstar8i (8" SCT).

Celestron Skymaster binoculars 15x70

Other:0.63 & 0.33 correctors. X2 & X4 barlow.

Imagers: Meade DSI & Celestron NexImage.  Canon EOS 550D

 

 

  • Member since
    December, 2013
Posted by Pepe Cuellar on Saturday, December 07, 2013 1:06 PM

Wink Yes

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