Polaris, a Jet and a meteor

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  • Member since
    September, 2013
Polaris, a Jet and a meteor
Posted by robadob275 on Thursday, September 19, 2013 4:24 AM

Picture of Polaris with a jet and a meteor caught in the exposures.  Taken with a Nikon D3100 and more than likely a lens set to 70mm, with a 2.2X magnifier.  Not sure of the apature setting.  Four pictures stacked using the Nebulosity3 software.  One exposure was 10 seconds, the other three 5 seconds.  ISO of 3200.  The jet and meteor were each caught in seperate exposures.  Not sure why the software created a stacked image where there seems to be an apparent haziness.  Couldn't get rid of it.  Wonder if it was just brining out light pollution not truly evident in each original picture, as I do not have a light pollution reducer filter (yet)?

  • Member since
    November, 2009
Posted by Poppa Chris on Thursday, September 19, 2013 6:16 AM

robadob275

Picture of Polaris with a jet and a meteor caught in the exposures.  Taken with a Nikon D3100 and more than likely a lens set to 70mm, with a 2.2X magnifier.  Not sure of the apature setting.  Four pictures stacked using the Nebulosity3 software.  One exposure was 10 seconds, the other three 5 seconds.  ISO of 3200.  The jet and meteor were each caught in seperate exposures.  Not sure why the software created a stacked image where there seems to be an apparent haziness.  Couldn't get rid of it.  Wonder if it was just brining out light pollution not truly evident in each original picture, as I do not have a light pollution reducer filter (yet)?

 

The "haziness" of the center may not be real but perceived since the photo shows the effects of vignetting in the corners and edges.  If you were using your fastest f/stop on your lens this was probably the culprit.  Try stopping down one or two stops and increasing your exposure time a tad.  That should help out a lot.  The other thing would be to shoot Darks and Flats to add to your stack to cancel out noise and the vignetting gradient.

---Poppa Chris---

Denham Springs, Louisiana USA

"Second star to the right - Then straight on until morning!" - Peter Pan

Celestron CPC1100GPS (XLT) - 279mm aperature, 2800mm Focal length. (f10) Celestron Ultima LX (70deg AFOV) Eyepieces 32mm thru 5mm, Canon EOS Rebel T2i DSLR, Backyard EOS imaging software, Orion Star Shoot Planetary Imager IV, Celestron Skymaster 15x70 binoculars

 

  • Member since
    March, 2008
Posted by Antitax on Thursday, September 19, 2013 7:11 AM

   The single line seems too regular to be a meteor, it's more likely a satellite or a smaller plane with only one light. Meteor traces on pictures are always tapered at both sides because the meteor brightens and then fades progressively (it's pretty fast but noticeable to the naked eye).

   Then the body of the line looks kinda grainy and thicker toward the middle, the mid-course brightnening and sparks cause that. Thus this straight featureless line matches a sat or a plane, I guess. Your pic of Polaris and its surroundings illustrates how much stuff flies around. It's got nice round stars, by the way.

TS 8x40 Wildlife, 10x50 Marine/Fujinon 16x70/TS 80mm triplet, 6x30 finder, EQ-3 mount, TS 2" 99% diagonal/Celestron C5+ and 6x30 finder, DIY tripod/5" Bahtinov/12" GSO dob, 8x50 finder/Meade 2" 24mm 82°/Hyperion 24,13,10mm 68°/TS Expanse 17mm 70°/SW 7mm Panorama 82°/Ultima 2x barlow/Astronomik UHC-E filter/Baader O-III/Astro Solar 5" & 80mm filters/Sky Atlas 2000/Rükl's Moon Atlas/Canon 400D/5mW green laser

  • Member since
    September, 2013
Posted by robadob275 on Thursday, September 19, 2013 9:53 AM

Thanks.  I'll remember about the f/stop and exposure times.  The beauty of trial and error...  learning.  And the digital world makes it sooooo much easier.  I got into photography a while back using film, but got too expensive to take and develop all those photos to find one good one...  if you're lucky.

 

~Rob

  • Member since
    September, 2013
Posted by robadob275 on Thursday, September 19, 2013 9:56 AM

Good to know about the satellite.  I remember when I took the pic and then reviewed it on my camera and noticed the line I didn't see a satellite before, during or after, so thought it was a quick burning meteor.  Very easily could have been a small satellite I couldn't see with the naked eye and only the timed exposure captured.

Thanks.

~Rob

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  • Member since
    July, 2001
  • From: PA, USA, Earth Moderator
Posted by DaveMitsky on Saturday, September 21, 2013 2:33 PM

The asterism known as the Engagement or Diamond Ring is also visible in your image.

http://astrojourney.wordpress.com/tag/engagement-ring-asterism/

http://www.deep-sky.co.uk/asterisms.htm

Dave Mitsky

Sic itur ad astra!

Chance favors the prepared mind.

A man is a small thing, and the night is very large and full of wonders.

  • Member since
    September, 2013
Posted by robadob275 on Monday, September 23, 2013 12:51 AM
Cool thing about the "engagement ring." Never knew of that. Thanks for the enlightenment and knowledge. ~Rob

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