Rosette Nebula in HST palette

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  • Member since
    February, 2008
Rosette Nebula in HST palette
Posted by GordonH on Monday, January 13, 2014 10:37 AM

Hi
This has taken a while to do because of the current storm system that has been affecting the UK. It was taken over 5 nights over the last six weeks or so and consists of 24x10 minutes Ha, 18x10 minutes OIII and 24x10 minutes SII taken with the Televue NP127is/FLI imaging system that I've been testing. The SII and half of the OIII was taken under far from ideal conditions with a three quarter moon close by and some thin mist towards the end of the session. The system is mounted on my Paramount ME with auto guiding taken care of by an Officine Stellare Falco guide scope and Starlight Xpress lodestar with dithering.
I have had a few goes at this in the past in both Ha and colour, these can be seen on my website http://www.imagingtheheavens.co.uk
The full size version of this image can be seen at the following link
http://ic2.pbase.com/o9/29/869929/1/154102554.MlqJGYXe.RosetteHSTmax.jpg
Thanks for looking
Best wishes
Gordon

Currently using a Tele Vue NP127/FLI (Atlas/Centreline/PL16803) prototype imaging system. Paramount ME. OS Falco guide scope and SX lodestar.

  • Member since
    October, 2012
  • From: Central Utah
Posted by TSmith on Tuesday, January 14, 2014 6:22 PM

That is a fantastic picture.  I really need to set up and have a try at that target.  Thanks for sharing it with us.

Travis Smith
Dry Creek View Observatory
dcvobservatory.com

Travis Smith
Dry Creek View Observatory
dcvobservatory.com

Scope: CGE 1400 FS; Camera: Nikon D3; Explora-Dome Observatory

  • Member since
    November, 2009
Posted by Poppa Chris on Wednesday, January 15, 2014 1:37 PM

While I've never been fond of the aesthetics of the Hubble pallet, the level of detail in your photo is excellent.  Are you planning more targets with this method?

 

---Poppa Chris---

Denham Springs, Louisiana USA

"Second star to the right - Then straight on until morning!" - Peter Pan

Celestron CPC1100GPS (XLT) - 279mm aperature, 2800mm Focal length. (f10) Celestron Ultima LX (70deg AFOV) Eyepieces 32mm thru 5mm, Canon EOS Rebel T2i DSLR, Backyard EOS imaging software, Orion Star Shoot Planetary Imager IV, Celestron Skymaster 15x70 binoculars

 

  • Member since
    December, 2005
Posted by Oliver Tunnah on Friday, January 24, 2014 7:55 AM

Woah, 3D without the glasses. Suburb again Gordon. I've never noticed the two horns before either.

  • Member since
    October, 2005
Posted by leo731 on Monday, January 27, 2014 4:10 PM

Very nice.  This object is fairly low from the UK isn't it?  Quite an image to get.  While large the diffuse nature of the Rosette Nebula can be difficult to see visually in conditions you mentioned. 

Thanks for sharing,

l

A nebula in the eyepiece is worth two in the Atlas.

  • Member since
    August, 2004
Posted by stars4life on Monday, January 27, 2014 4:28 PM

Exquisite!

  • Member since
    February, 2008
Posted by GordonH on Tuesday, January 28, 2014 2:12 PM

Poppa Chris

While I've never been fond of the aesthetics of the Hubble pallet, the level of detail in your photo is excellent.  Are you planning more targets with this method?

 

 

Hi

Thanks for the comments, with the system I am using at the moment I am using a simple seven stage processing workflow which suits me and I will be continuing with this for future narrow band subjects

Best wishes

Gordon

Currently using a Tele Vue NP127/FLI (Atlas/Centreline/PL16803) prototype imaging system. Paramount ME. OS Falco guide scope and SX lodestar.

  • Member since
    December, 2005
Posted by Oliver Tunnah on Wednesday, January 29, 2014 7:59 AM

leo731
Very nice.  This object is fairly low from the UK isn't it?

Well that depends. From Bristol Orion get's fairly high and thus so does Monoceros. I wouldn't say the Rosette is difficult due to being too low in the sky.

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