Anyone else shooting film?

8129 views
15 replies
1 rating 2 rating 3 rating 4 rating 5 rating
  • Member since
    June, 2009
Anyone else shooting film?
Posted by nightfly on Sunday, January 30, 2011 2:44 PM

 I'm seeing nothing here on the "conventional film camera" forum.  The media likes to say film is dead.  I think there are those that find it still satisfying.

 

http://www.flickr.com/photos/12598495@N08/5238737630/

Moderator
  • Member since
    July, 2002
  • From: Texas
Posted by chipdatajeffB on Sunday, January 30, 2011 4:00 PM

It will be interesting to see the responses. Good question!

It's pretty dead, but I still use it for meteor showers since I don't have a good low-light camera system that's widefield, much less the four or five digital cameras it would take to replace my multi-SLR half-sky system using film:

 Main problem with this system is the film and processing for a full night runs almost $200 if all I shoot is a couple hours centered on one peak.

If you limit yourself to about 1/5th of the sky using a widefield lens on a DSLR, you can do a better job with a lot less equipment and work (and no processing costs other than your own time).

I'm looking at replacing this system with three Canon 300 bodies (using wide-angle lenses I already have).

Notes and comments on that system are here, and there are several detailed closeups and info in adjacent photos there as well.

The universe is not only stranger than we imagine, it's stranger than we CAN imagine. --- JBS Haldane

Come visit me at Comanche Springs Astronomy Campus (we're on Google Maps) in Texas.

www.3rf.org

Moderator
  • Member since
    July, 2002
  • From: Texas
Posted by chipdatajeffB on Sunday, January 30, 2011 4:05 PM

BTW: Your stuff on Flickr! is gorgeous ... Smile, Wink & Grin

The universe is not only stranger than we imagine, it's stranger than we CAN imagine. --- JBS Haldane

Come visit me at Comanche Springs Astronomy Campus (we're on Google Maps) in Texas.

www.3rf.org

  • Member since
    June, 2009
Posted by nightfly on Sunday, January 30, 2011 4:12 PM

That's an amazing setup.  I can see why you would seriously consider going digital with the cost and all.  Keeping track of the film cameras might be easier, perhaps.

I like to shoot with no batteries, no lights, no beeping, etc.  Also, when I look at my transparencies, I know it's starlight that is caught up in those grains on the film.  It is aesthetics for me.

 

  • Member since
    November, 2010
  • From: Orland Park Ilinois
Posted by stargazer1313 on Saturday, December 31, 2011 12:56 PM

What are the best films for this kind of astrophotography? My dad has a film camera that he doesn't really use anymore and I was thinking about fiddling with it a little bit. Also the battery for the camera is dead. Do you know where I could buy one and the film if I chose to pursue this?

Michael

"Imagination is more important than knowledge"

<Celestron Astromaster 76 eq telescope> < 114 LCM Celestron telescope>

7x50 binocs

25 Red, 80A, 15, 58, UHC/LPR Filter.

X-Cel Lx 12mm, Skymaster 15x70 Binocs

 

  • Member since
    June, 2009
Posted by nightfly on Saturday, December 31, 2011 1:45 PM

stargazer1313

What are the best films for this kind of astrophotography? My dad has a film camera that he doesn't really use anymore and I was thinking about fiddling with it a little bit. Also the battery for the camera is dead. Do you know where I could buy one and the film if I chose to pursue this?

Common 35mm film such as Kodak Gold 100, 200, and 400 as well as Fujicolor 100, 200, and 400.  Slide films like Fujichrome 100 and 400 and Kodak E100G do well.

If the camera needs a battery for long exposures, you might want to buy a few.  On some cameras the bulb mode does not use the battery.  I might be able to help you more if I knew what make and model your camera is.  Also, I may make some suggestions on the use of your lenses.  What focal length and f-stop, etc?

View my blog for notes and film tests.

Jim

 

http://nightflyphotography.blogspot.com/

 

 

 

  • Member since
    November, 2010
  • From: Orland Park Ilinois
Posted by stargazer1313 on Sunday, January 01, 2012 7:28 AM

I think its a Nikon F2A. It isn't the earlist film camera ever its my dads. I dont really know a whole lot about cameras but I was maybe just going to shoot a few short exposure shots of like make the orion constellation. The battery is dead though and it needs knew film(not expensive film I hope)

Michael

"Imagination is more important than knowledge"

<Celestron Astromaster 76 eq telescope> < 114 LCM Celestron telescope>

7x50 binocs

25 Red, 80A, 15, 58, UHC/LPR Filter.

X-Cel Lx 12mm, Skymaster 15x70 Binocs

 

  • Member since
    June, 2009
Posted by nightfly on Monday, January 02, 2012 5:36 AM

Have you tried operating the camera?  It is rather old.  It might need a CLA.  Try the shutter, does it fire.  Set the shutter to "B", does the shutter stay open?  Google the owners manual and read about it.  Sounds like a little research will help.  

 

Kodak Gold can be as cheap as a few dolars a roll.  Pro slide film can be as much as $12.00!

 

 

 

 

Moderator
  • Member since
    July, 2001
  • From: PA, USA, Earth Moderator
Posted by DaveMitsky on Sunday, January 08, 2012 11:25 AM

chipdatajeffB

BTW: Your stuff on Flickr! is gorgeous ... Smile, Wink & Grin

Having just taken a look, I certainly agree.

Dave Mitsky

Sic itur ad astra!

Chance favors the prepared mind.

A man is a small thing, and the night is very large and full of wonders.

  • Member since
    July, 2008
Posted by Ray 'O' Light on Tuesday, June 26, 2012 12:43 AM

I have a Mionolta 7000 with a 90-300 lense that I shot the moon last month when it was at it's closest. Haven't develpoed the film yet but I'm axious to see it. It's getting harder to find places to develope.

My waist is expanding quicker than the universe. Maybe.
  • Member since
    June, 2009
Posted by nightfly on Tuesday, June 26, 2012 5:34 AM

You are right about finding a processor nearby.  I send all my rolls out to a pro lab the next state over.  I believe Walmart can do a "send out" film service still.  I hear others doing this very recently.  

  • Member since
    July, 2008
Posted by Ray 'O' Light on Wednesday, June 27, 2012 2:39 AM

A local Costco still does it. Had mine done today. Well.......my very very first ever attempt at sky shooting. And, well, THAT'S obvious. But maybe someone will get a chance to use this as an example of something. There was a street light just fifty feet away and approx 90 degrees to the right. The moon looked much bigger in person. Much bigger. Even in the zoomed shot I'm surprised it came out so small.

=

 http://inlinethumb50.webshots.com/50097/2731124500106019956S600x600Q85.jpg

My waist is expanding quicker than the universe. Maybe.
  • Member since
    June, 2009
Posted by nightfly on Wednesday, June 27, 2012 5:25 PM

The way film is processed now is develo, scan, and print.  I don't think you can get even machine prints anymore.  They tend to print oversharpened (like you want them to look like digital) and overly contrasty with blown highlights.  The film has much more data and much smoother tonality if you scan it yourself.  The Plustek models do a really good job.  My Epson is marginal for 35mm.  

  • Member since
    July, 2012
  • From: Norwich, CT
Posted by Pavo on Thursday, July 05, 2012 9:05 PM

I shoot film, mostly black and white - a nearby CVS still processes C-41 and won't cut the roll if I remind them.  It's only a couple of bucks.  I have equipment for a full darkroom, but I haven't developed my own film in years.  I'm not even sure where to get chemicals anymore.  All the old camera shops are long gone.  I'm just beginning to dabble into DSLR, and so far I'm not happy with my camera (15 second max exposure), so that'll probably be my next big purchase.

  • Member since
    August, 2008
Posted by BrianC on Wednesday, November 28, 2012 11:31 AM

Not anymore...got spoiled with the sensitivity of digital and dont miss the mess in the dark room. I have several canon ae-1's sitting in the basement collecting dust. Lots of memories of cold winter nights at the Milwaukee astro society's B-dome telescope.

Director of 'Orion Backyard Observatory' a blog for small aperture observers.
  • Member since
    November, 2009
Posted by Poppa Chris on Wednesday, November 28, 2012 1:50 PM

I gave up on film for all of my photography years ago.  Economics more than anything.  Where I used to be very careful of the limited number of shots taken, I now fire off hundreds of frames. And can touch things up in software if needed.  Digital really has made a better photographer out of me.

PS:  I have a vintage Minolta SLR with several lenses and accesories available if anyone wants to cut a deal...

---Poppa Chris---

Denham Springs, Louisiana USA

"Second star to the right - Then straight on until morning!" - Peter Pan

Celestron CPC1100GPS (XLT) - 279mm aperature, 2800mm Focal length. (f10) Celestron Ultima LX (70deg AFOV) Eyepieces 32mm thru 5mm, Canon EOS Rebel T2i DSLR, Backyard EOS imaging software, Orion Star Shoot Planetary Imager IV, Celestron Skymaster 15x70 binoculars

 

Join our Community!

Our community is FREE to join. To participate you must either login or register for an account.

ADVERTISEMENT

FREE EMAIL NEWSLETTER

Receive news, sky-event information, observing tips, and more from Astronomy's weekly email newsletter.

ADVERTISEMENT
ADVERTISEMENT
Find us on Facebook

Loading...