Best dSLR and Lenses

685 views
5 replies
1 rating 2 rating 3 rating 4 rating 5 rating
  • Member since
    August, 2009
Best dSLR and Lenses
Posted by darkmatter4brains on Monday, November 04, 2013 7:15 PM

Hello,

I'd like to get into astrophotography, but mainly starting with just the dSLR, taking photos of the Milky Way, Star Trails, etc.

 

I'm looking at the Canon EOS 6D, which sounds like a good camera for this.  Is that true?  Any pros/cons? Any that might be better?  Also, would the 6D work well if I ever do want to hook it up to a telescope?

 

Next up, lenses.  I've had this lens recommended to me:

http://www.amazon.com/Sigma-Aspherical-Angle-Digital-Cameras/dp/B00005RKSK/ref=sr_sp-atf_title_1_1?ie=UTF8&qid=1383614066&sr=8-1&keywords=sigma+f1.8+wide

 

Sounds like wide is important.  Just wondering if there is anything else to think about.  Perhaps a better lens.

Thanks for any feedback!

 

My Blog -> Explore A Bit More

  • Member since
    November, 2009
Posted by Poppa Chris on Monday, November 04, 2013 8:28 PM

The 6D would be an excellent camera choice.  The lens is also good.  You won't be using it for AP that much except for wide field "piggy-back" shots.  Most of your work will be at prime focus with your scope acting as the cameras lens.  Your next thought should be concerning a laptop for use at the scope in the field and capture software.  Personally i use an HP Pavilion DV7 with 4GB ram and a 750GB hard drive.  The best capture software out there currently is Backyard EOS, specifically designed for Canon cameras and only $35 - $60 depending on whether you get the classic or premium version.  Not only for still photos of DSOs but will let you use your DSLR as a planetary imager.  Best thing since sliced bread. 

Processing software is important also.  Most people use Deep Sky Stacker and Photoshop but there are cheaper alternatives to Photoshop, like GIMP.  Some are even freeware.  One particular package I'm starting to like an awful lot is Pixinsight.  Not free but at 171 Euros ($225 US) a lot cheaper than Photoshop CS6.  For planets, Registax or Autostakkert are both free.

You didn't mention your scope.  But a steady mount that can be polar aligned equitorially is of paramount importance.  Probably the most important key to success.  Things like autoguide cameras, guide scopes, etc. can wait a bit until you grow in experience a bit.

---Poppa Chris---

Denham Springs, Louisiana USA

"Second star to the right - Then straight on until morning!" - Peter Pan

Celestron CPC1100GPS (XLT) - 279mm aperature, 2800mm Focal length. (f10) Celestron Ultima LX (70deg AFOV) Eyepieces 32mm thru 5mm, Canon EOS Rebel T2i DSLR, Backyard EOS imaging software, Orion Star Shoot Planetary Imager IV, Celestron Skymaster 15x70 binoculars

 

  • Member since
    August, 2009
Posted by darkmatter4brains on Tuesday, November 05, 2013 2:43 PM

Thanks for all the info! Sounds like I am heading down a good path then.  I have a 4" Newtonian scope that I have done some webcam stuff on.  I think it will be quite a while before I hook up the new Canon to a scope and hopefully a bigger/better one when I do.

 

One warning I got about the 6D is something about IR sensitivity.  I guess the 60da doesn't have this problem?  Any idea what that is about and if it's a concern at all?

 

I do have photoshop CC, but I've been wondering if Lightroom is a good thing to get.  Sounds like quite a few guys use that for star stacks, Milky way editing, etc.  Not too steep of a price, either.

 

Thanks again

My Blog -> Explore A Bit More

  • Member since
    November, 2009
Posted by Poppa Chris on Tuesday, November 05, 2013 3:03 PM

Terrestial DSLRs have an IR blocking filter ahead of the sensor sence they are most often used in daylight.  This diminishes sensitivity in the H-aplha wavelengths.  Not much of a problem if you ask me.  while purists spend the extra money on a "modded" camera (which merely removes this filter) most hobbyists don't bother about it and take spectacular pictures with the standard DSLR. In fact, it can get hard to tell which shots were taken by which camera unless th etarget is very heavy in H-Alpha.  If you do get a modded 60DA then you will need to keep an IR filter on your lenses to take normal family photos etc.

FYI:  You may have a bit of trouble reaching focus with any DSLR on a Newtonian.  There may not be enogh backfocus distance to reach the camera sensor focal plane.  This may mean you will either have to replace the focuser you have with a low-profile focuser, or you my have to move the location of your focuser and your secondary spider to adjust where the light cone comes to focus when it exits the focuser.  "Astrograph" Newtonians have taken this into account at the factory. 

As for software:  Photoshop CC (Creative Cloud) can already do anything Lightroom can do processing-wise.  For stacking Photoshop in any form can get tedious.  Deep Sky Stacker does a very fine job of this chore and the price its right (Free).

If you want one single package that does all of you processing, the I would recommend Pixinsight or ImagesPlus.

But for capture and control of your Canon DSLR - nothing will beat BackYard EOS (although some try, but they don't quite come up to the mark IMHO). 

---Poppa Chris---

Denham Springs, Louisiana USA

"Second star to the right - Then straight on until morning!" - Peter Pan

Celestron CPC1100GPS (XLT) - 279mm aperature, 2800mm Focal length. (f10) Celestron Ultima LX (70deg AFOV) Eyepieces 32mm thru 5mm, Canon EOS Rebel T2i DSLR, Backyard EOS imaging software, Orion Star Shoot Planetary Imager IV, Celestron Skymaster 15x70 binoculars

 

  • Member since
    August, 2009
Posted by darkmatter4brains on Friday, November 29, 2013 11:00 AM

Sorry for the delayed reply here.  I ended up purchasing the Canon 6D with a Sigma 20mm f/1.8!  Seemed to make more sense for me especially since I plan to take a lot of daytime, landscape photos too, so I think the specialized A versions wouldn't make senses for my uses.  The IR filter would have been a pain, I think.  Plus it looks like the 6D does really, really well in low light.

We also subscribed to the Creative Cloud, still not too sure what to think abotu the monthly pricing, though.  I'll have to check out that BackYardEOS, haven't heard of that one before.

My Blog -> Explore A Bit More

  • Member since
    October, 2013
Posted by Tony383 on Friday, November 29, 2013 11:40 AM

To Darkmatter, another recommended addtion might be a used manual Nikkor f2.8 180mm ED lens with a fotodiox adapter ($10 on Ebay) to a Canon mount.  These old manual lenses can be found on Ebay for about $250 and are really nice for piggybacking or using standalone on a tracking mount. I really love the fact that once you achieve focus, you can tape it down with electrical tape and it is guaranteed not to move.  You will, however, need an ADM rail to attach the camera which will perfectly support the Nikkor lens as long as you use velcro to support the end of the lens.  You can also obtain a teleconverter on Ebay for around $75.  

The lens is nice in that it can be used at f2.8 with very good results, although stopping it down is better.  

To give you an idea of the field of view without any teleconverter, you can get Orion's belt, the flame, the horsehead, the Running Man, and the Orion Nebula in the same field of view.  

 

 

 

"The problem with quotes on the internet is that it is hard to determine whether they are genuine"  Abraham Lincoln

Dobsonian, 72mm Astro-Tech ED refractor, a bunch of eyepieces, a couple of filters, a DSLR and german equatorial mount, binoculars

Join our Community!

Our community is FREE to join. To participate you must either login or register for an account.

ADVERTISEMENT

FREE EMAIL NEWSLETTER

Receive news, sky-event information, observing tips, and more from Astronomy's weekly email newsletter.

ADVERTISEMENT
ADVERTISEMENT
Find us on Facebook

Loading...