whats going wrong

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  • Member since
    August, 2013
whats going wrong
Posted by Brucey on Sunday, September 15, 2013 11:21 PM
Please help. I have a canon 600d iv attached it to my 130mm reflector scope but i cant see any stars on the display and when i try for the moon its way to bright and out of focus. Im going to get a book on it later today hopefully but can anyone tell me what i might be doing wrong. Ty
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  • Member since
    July, 2002
  • From: Texas
Posted by chipdatajeffB on Monday, September 16, 2013 8:55 AM

It is quite likely overexposed. For the Moon, use an exposure that is just like what you'd use to shoot a daylight landscape (you are, after all, photographing reflected sunlight that's just as bright as what you see in daylight, and at about the same distance from the Sun).

You should also use a low ISO setting.

That will ensure you're not way overexposing the Moon. Once you can see the Moon more clearly in your viewfinder, you should be better able to judge focus.

With a reflector, you'll often find the camera won't go far enough toward the mirror to achieve focus. Some reflectors include a 2" focuser with a barrel that is thread for a T-adapter, so you can "lower" your camera closer to the reflector's body.

Another way to handle the problem (should you have it) is to move the focal point further from the body of the telescope. The easy way to do this is to use a barlow attached to the camera adapter. That method also increases the focal length of the scope so much that the field of view you can photograph is much smaller.

It is more difficult, and requires modifying the telescope, but you can also move the focal point further out by moving the primary mirror of the telescope toward the focuser. This involves removing the mirror and its cell and drilling a new set of mounting holes for it, an inch or two further than the current holes toward the front end of the scope.

The universe is not only stranger than we imagine, it's stranger than we CAN imagine. --- JBS Haldane

Come visit me at Comanche Springs Astronomy Campus (we're on Google Maps) in Texas.

www.3rf.org

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  • Member since
    July, 2002
  • From: Texas
Posted by chipdatajeffB on Monday, September 16, 2013 9:47 AM

Pardon me if you already know this, but be sure your camera's autofocus is turned Off ...

The universe is not only stranger than we imagine, it's stranger than we CAN imagine. --- JBS Haldane

Come visit me at Comanche Springs Astronomy Campus (we're on Google Maps) in Texas.

www.3rf.org

  • Member since
    August, 2013
Posted by Brucey on Monday, September 16, 2013 6:17 PM
Thank you very much i will have a crack at that when i can. As for auto focus its probs still on as im a complete noob at this lol. Im looking forward to it now :P
  • Member since
    October, 2007
Posted by Aratus on Tuesday, September 17, 2013 1:18 PM

Stars are too faint to be seen on the real time display.  (Very bright ones might)   Unlike lunar photos you will need the highest ISO you can for stars.   If the moon is about use that (as described above) to get the focusing right.   Then set the ISO high again, and the exposure to about 8 seconds.   You should see stars.

Aratus

Location:  North West Devon, UK

-------------------------------------------------

Celestron Nexstar8i (8" SCT).

Celestron Skymaster binoculars 15x70

Other:0.63 & 0.33 correctors. X2 & X4 barlow.

Imagers: Meade DSI & Celestron NexImage.  Canon EOS 550D

 

 

  • Member since
    August, 2013
Posted by Brucey on Tuesday, September 17, 2013 6:26 PM
Nice one. this is a whole new world to me. Im normaly hitting people with my face on a rugby pitch. I need to use my head in an other way for this hobby. Thank you so much for your help guys.
  • Member since
    August, 2010
Posted by keithkirk on Thursday, September 19, 2013 10:28 PM

I had the same problem last night. I tried to use my new Samsung WB100 point and shoot camera and could not even get the moon to focus on  the camra display screen even though I could focus the telescope. And would some one Please explain how I post a video to this form?

  • Member since
    August, 2013
Posted by Brucey on Saturday, September 21, 2013 4:39 PM
Thanks so much guys. I dropped a barlow in, messed with iso and bosh it was there. What can i do now with my pics of the moon? Photoshop?
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  • Member since
    July, 2002
  • From: Texas
Posted by chipdatajeffB on Saturday, September 21, 2013 6:20 PM

 

What you do now depends on how the photos turned out and what you want to do with them.

When I photograph the Moon with my DSLR (which has rather noisy electronics), I normally take 10 to 25 images of the same scene, then combine them using Registax to sharpen and enhance them. After that, I post them to my Flickr! online albums. Sometimes I then post them here on the Forum, or on other Forums.

If your camera is less noisy, it may suffice to just load the photo into a program like Photoshop and shift the histogram to produce the most pleasing result.

The Moon's surface has rich detail, which can benefit from Registax sharpening. Registering and stacking multiple photos of the same scene allow the software to produce a composite image you then sharpen with wavelets during processing. This generally results in a single final image that is much better than any of the individual frames you shot originally.

To post photos here on the Forum, you must first place the photo online. Many of us use Photobucket or Flickr! for that. Once the photo is online, you use the hosting site's sharing tool to copy the URL of the image into a post here, using the "filmstrip" icon just above the posting window at the Post Body dialog box. When you click that icon, a popup appears, into which you copy the photo's URL. That pastes the URL into the body of the post using the proper HTML coding to allow the photo to appear "in" the body of the post when you Submit it.

The universe is not only stranger than we imagine, it's stranger than we CAN imagine. --- JBS Haldane

Come visit me at Comanche Springs Astronomy Campus (we're on Google Maps) in Texas.

www.3rf.org

  • Member since
    October, 2007
Posted by Aratus on Sunday, September 29, 2013 3:52 AM

keithkirk

I had the same problem last night. I tried to use my new Samsung WB100 point and shoot camera and could not even get the moon to focus on  the camra display screen even though I could focus the telescope. And would some one Please explain how I post a video to this form?

 

The area through which you can 'see' through a telescope can be quite small.   It is best to use a bracket to hold the camera in just the right position.   Having said that people were successfully using a phone camera to take pictures of the moon through their telescopes on 'The Sky at Night' recently.    I suspect they were using very wide angle eyepieces.

Aratus

Location:  North West Devon, UK

-------------------------------------------------

Celestron Nexstar8i (8" SCT).

Celestron Skymaster binoculars 15x70

Other:0.63 & 0.33 correctors. X2 & X4 barlow.

Imagers: Meade DSI & Celestron NexImage.  Canon EOS 550D

 

 

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